Search results for 'World War, 1939-1945 Congresses' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Peter Steinfels & Carol Levine (eds.) (1976). Biomedical Ethics and the Shadow of Nazism: A Conference on the Proper Use of the Nazi Analogy in Ethical Debate, April 8, 1976. The Center.score: 780.0
     
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  2. Helmut Burckhardt (1974). The Second World War 1939–1945. Philosophy and History 7 (2):219-220.score: 604.8
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  3. Brian Holden Reid (1989). War at Any Price: World War II in Europe, 1939–1945. History of European Ideas 10 (6):734-735.score: 590.4
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  4. David Williams (2004). Defending Japan's Pacific War: The Kyoto School Philosophers and Post-White Power. Routledgecurzon.score: 451.2
    This book puts forward a revisionist view of Japanese wartime thinking. It seeks to explore why Japanese intellectuals, historians and philosophers of the time insisted that Japan had to turn its back on the West and attack the United States and the British Empire. Based on a close reading of the texts written by members of the highly influential Kyoto School, and revisiting the dialogue between the Kyoto School and the German philosopher Heidegger, it argues that the work of Kyoto (...)
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  5. Norman Geras (1995). Solidarity in the Conversation of Humankind: The Ungroundable Liberalism of Richard Rorty. Verso.score: 403.2
    Introduction This book aims at continuing a conversation. It takes for interlocutor a writer who is himself today indefatigable in engaging with the ideas ...
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  6. Fredo Arias de la Canal (2007). El Por Qué de Las Dos Guerras Mundiales. Frente de Afirmación Hispanista.score: 403.2
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  7. F. R. Barry (1940). Faith in Dark Ages. London, Student Christian Movement Press.score: 403.2
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  8. William Brennan (1980). Medical Holocausts. Nordland Pub. International.score: 403.2
    v. 1. Exterminative medicine in Nazi Germany and contemporary America -- v. 2. The language of exterminative medicine in Nazi Germany and contemporary America.
     
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  9. D. R. Davies (1940). The Two Humanities. [London]J. Clarke & Co., Ltd..score: 403.2
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  10. Dirk Heinrichs (2007). Was Besagt Vergessen & Erinnern des Guten? Edition Temmen.score: 403.2
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  11. Kumiko Ishikawa (2009). "Yowasa" to "Teikō" No Kindai Kokugaku: Senjika No Yanagita Kunio, Yasuda Yojūrō, Orikuchi Shinobu. Kōdansha.score: 403.2
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  12. N. N. Kazanskiĭ (ed.) (2005). Lingvistika V Gody Voĭny--Li͡udi, Sudʹby, Svershenii͡a: Materialy Vserossiĭskoĭ Konferent͡sii, Posvi͡ashchennoĭ 60-Letii͡u Pobedy V Velikoĭ Otechestvennoĭ Voĭne. Nauka.score: 403.2
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  13. Kōji Tanaka (2009). Motoori Norinaga No Dai Tōa Sensō. Perikansha.score: 403.2
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  14. Harold H. Titus (1943). What is a Mature Morality? New York, the Macmillan Company.score: 403.2
     
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  15. Gereon Wolters (2004). Vertuschung, Anklage, Rechtfertigung: Impromptus Zum Rückblick der Deutschen Philosophie Auf Das "Dritte Reich". University Press.score: 403.2
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  16. Patrick Petitjean (2008). The Joint Establishment of the World Federation of Scientific Workers and of UNESCO After World War II. Minerva 46 (2):247-270.score: 279.0
    The World Federation of Scientific Workers (WFScW) and UNESCO share roots in the Social Relations of Science (SRS) movements and in the Franco-British scientific relations which developed in the 1930s. In this historical context (the Great Depression, the rise of Fascism and the Nazi use of science, the social and intellectual fascination for the USSR), a new model of scientific internationalism emerged, where science and politics mixed. Many progressive scientists were involved in the war efforts against Nazism, and tried (...)
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  17. Bob Moore (2010). The Treatment of Prisoners of War In The Western European Theatre of War 1939-1945. In Sibylle Scheipers (ed.), Prisoners in War. Oup Oxford.score: 268.2
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  18. Michael Geyer (1977). Peace Initiatives and Power Politics in the Second World War, 1939–1942. Philosophy and History 10 (2):226-229.score: 259.2
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  19. R. M. Swain (2002). A War To Be Won: Fighting the Second World War, 1937-1945. By Williamson Murray and Allan R. Millett. The European Legacy 7 (4):531-531.score: 259.2
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  20. John Stanley Wozniak (1972). Hitler's Dictatorship Until the Beginning of The Second World War, 1933 to 1939. Philosophy and History 5 (2):204-205.score: 253.8
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  21. A. W. Gomme (1947). Thucydides Louis E. Lord: Thucydides and the World War. (Martin Classical Lectures, Vol. XII.) Pp. Xiv+300. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press (London: Oxford University Press), 1945. Cloth, 20s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 61 (02):53-54.score: 253.8
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  22. Erwin Hölzle (1970). Germany's Armament in the Second World War. Hitler's Conferences with Albert Speer 1942–1945. Philosophy and History 3 (1):69-70.score: 253.8
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  23. Erich Gaenschalz (1990). The Destruction of Europe. Essays on the World War Era, 1914–1945. Philosophy and History 23 (2):169-170.score: 253.8
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  24. Helmut Rumpler (1983). Europe and World Politics in the Post-War Years, 1945–1963. Philosophy and History 16 (1):63-64.score: 253.8
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  25. Wilhelm Sommerlad (1978). The Beginning of the War, 1939. Unleashing or Outbreak of the Second World War? Philosophy and History 11 (2):224-226.score: 253.8
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  26. Thomas Stamm-Kuhlmann (1990). Synagogues in Hesse. What has Happened Since 1945? A Documentation and Analysis From All 221 Towns in Hesse Whose Synagogue Buildings Survived the Pogrom Night of 1938 and the Second World War. [REVIEW] Philosophy and History 23 (2):153-154.score: 253.8
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  27. John David Skrentny (1998). The Effect of the Cold War on African-American Civil Rights: America and the World Audience, 1945–1968. Theory and Society 27 (2):237-285.score: 243.0
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  28. Solomon Feferman, For Jan Wolenski, on the Occasion of His 60th Birthday.score: 196.8
    In the summer of 1957 at Cornell University the first of a cavalcade of large-scale meetings partially or completely devoted to logic took place--the five-week long Summer Institute for Symbolic Logic. That meeting turned out to be a watershed event in the development of logic: it was unique in bringing together for such an extended period researchers at every level in all parts of the subject, and the synergetic connections established there would thenceforth change the face of mathematical logic both (...)
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  29. Andrzej Friszke (2006). Polish Democratic Thought in the Occupied Country 1939–1945. Dialogue and Universalism 16 (7-9):79-87.score: 154.8
    Political thought of the war and occupation period continued the ideological and program searches started already before 1939. The concept of democracy was mostly associated with the values such as individual freedom, civil rights, safety of citizens, society of the state; cooperation among nations in the fields of politics, economy and protection of peace. The author deals with topics like: democratic international order; democratic political order and economic system. The author concludes the article with a few synthesizing remarks.
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  30. Jessica Reinisch (2007). A New Beginning? German Medical and Political Traditions in the Aftermath of the Second World War. Minerva 45 (3):241-257.score: 127.8
    After 1945, the German medical community underwent a period of self-examination. The profession’s experience during the Nazi period raised profound questions concerning its ethical integrity and political allegiances. This paper considers the advent of medical nationalism, and shows how, in Berlin and in the Soviet zone of Germany, narratives were constructed to show a new and positive picture of German medicine.
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  31. Nobuo Kazashi (2008). Passions for Philosophy in The Post-Hiroshima Age. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 29:57-63.score: 116.0
    Nishida’s analyses of human bodily existence, anticipating Merleau-Ponty’s, led him to accomplish his own “return to the lifeworld.” The later Nishida wrote: “I have now come to regard what I used to call the world of pure experience as the world of historical reality. The world of action-intuition is none other than the world of pure experience.” But Nishida’s attempt at a radical reconstruction of philosophy seems to suffer from a metaphysical optimism deriving from his notion (...)
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  32. Tetiana Klynina (2014). "Палестинське Питання" В Англо-Американських Відносинах (1945-1948 Роки). Схід 3:38-42.score: 113.4
    The paper reviews the 'Palestinian issue' in Anglo-American diplomacy after the end of World War II (1945-1948). The author examines activities of the Anglo-American Committee of Inquiry on Palestine and reveals the nature of Anglo-American controversy as to the Palestinian issue for the purpose. The operation of the above Committee resulted in identification of principles of the future structure of Palestine, which implied equitable coexistence of the Arabs and the Jews within one territory controlled by Great Britain, with two (...)
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  33. Thomas Baldwin (ed.) (2003/2012). The Cambridge History of Philosophy, 1870-1945. Cambridge University Press.score: 111.6
    The Cambridge History of Philosophy 1870-1945 comprises over sixty specially commissioned essays by experts on the philosophy of this period, and is designed to be accessible to non-specialists. The first part of the book traces the history of philosophy from its remarkable flowering in the 1870s through to the early years of the twentieth century. After a brief discussion of the impact of the First World War, the second part of the book describes further developments in philosophy in the (...)
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  34. Francesco Casetti (1999). Theories of Cinema, 1945-1995. University of Texas Press.score: 111.6
    The study of film entered a new era after World War II, as cinema became an acceptable focus for intellectual inquiry. The many ways in which cinema has been imagined, studied, and discussed in the last fifty years are the subject of this comprehensive overview of film theory in the United States and Europe since 1945. Francesco Casetti groups his essays around principal movements in film studies. In the first part of the book, he reviews the attempts at defining (...)
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  35. Jeffrey A. Johnson (1998). German Women in Chemistry, 1925–1945 (Part II). NTM International Journal of History and Ethics of Natural Sciences, Technology and Medicine 6 (1):65-90.score: 111.6
    The paper traces the role of German women into the chemistry profession from 1925 to 1945, examining their relative numbers and experience in higher education, in academic and industrial careers as well as in professional organizations such as the Verein Deutscher Chemikerinnen. The paper examines the effect of the 1930s Depression, National Socialism, and World War II on women chemists, considering both general trends as well as the experiences and achievements of several individual women in a variety of situations. (...)
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  36. J. W. Grove (1996). Stalin's Bomb: Soviet Physicists and the Cold War. [REVIEW] Minerva 34 (4):381-392.score: 111.6
    Revisionist historians of the nuclear age have long argued that it was not necessary to have used the atomic bombs in August 1945 to bring the Second World War to an end, and that a more conciliatory approach by the Truman administration towards the Soviet Union—being franker with Stalin about the bomb and giving him an assurance that it would not be used—would have created a better chance of achieving a less confrontational postwar relationship between the two powers. They (...)
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  37. Simon Bradford (2007). The 'Good Youth Leader': Constructions of Professionalism in English Youth Work, 1939-45. Ethics and Social Welfare 1 (3):293-309.score: 108.0
    This article explores the development of professional training for youth leaders (now, youth workers) in England and Wales between 1939 and 1945. The article identifies the state's construction of young people as a problematic social category at a time of national crisis and its mobilization of youth leadership as part of the war effort. The Board of Education supported, sometimes tacitly, the development of courses in some universities and voluntary organizations for youth leaders. By 1942 full-time courses of training existed (...)
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  38. Olena Kutsenko (2014). Програмні Позиції Соціал-Демократичної Партії Німеччини Щодо Економічної Перебудови Німеччини Після Розгрому Нацизму (1945-1949 Рр.). [REVIEW] Схід 6:206-210.score: 108.0
    Based on analysis of program documents and performances of the leading actors of Social Democratic Party of Germany, this article examines economic views and conceptions of social-democrats during the period of occupation between 1945 and 1949. The article analyzes the background of these economic concepts starting from the times of Nazi regime in Germany when SDP leaders were living in exile, and describes their evolution between 1945 and 1945 during the negotiations of three post-war Party Congresses. The article substantiates (...)
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  39. Susana Pinar (2002). The Emergence of Modern Genetics in Spain and the Effects of the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) on Its Development. Journal of the History of Biology 35 (1):111 - 148.score: 108.0
    The aim of this paper is to show how modern genetics reached Spain through the Junta para la Ampliación de Estudios e Investigaciones Científicas (JAE) during the decade of 1920s, the role played by key persons, and the level of development this discipline achieved from its different points of inception and under the conditions of financial scarcity and political turmoil that prevailed during the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939). In addition, the effect of the war on the continuity of the lines (...)
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  40. Piotr Köhler (2011). Lysenko Affair and Polish Botany. Journal of the History of Biology 44 (2):305 - 343.score: 102.6
    This article describes the slight impact of Lysenkoism upon Polish botany. I begin with an account of the development of plant genetics in Poland, as well as the attitude of scientists and the Polish intelligentsia toward Marxist philosophy prior to the World War II. Next I provide a short history of the introduction and demise of Lysenkoism in Polish science, with a focus on events in botany, in context with key events in Polish science from 1939 to 1958. The (...)
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  41. Andreas Frewer (2010). Human Rights From the Nuremberg Doctors Trial to the Geneva Declaration. Persons and Institutions in Medical Ethics and History. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (3):259-268.score: 102.6
    The “Universal Declaration of Human Rights” and the “Geneva Declaration” by the World Medical Association, both in 1948, were preceded by the foundation of the United Nations in New York (1945), the World Medical Association in London (1946) and the World Health Organization in Geneva (1948). After the end of World War II the community of nations strove to achieve and sustain their primary goals of peace and security, as well as their basic premise, namely the (...)
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  42. Amy L. Bentley (1994). Uneasy Sacrifice: The Politics of United States Famine Relief, 1945–48. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 11 (4):4-18.score: 94.0
    The United States, which committed itself to alleviating the severe post-World War II global famine, failed to meet its relief commitments. Relief efforts failed largely because voluntary attempts at reducing consumption proved too difficult, and the U. S. government refused to return to mandatory rationing of food despite evidence indicating the majority of Americans, especially American women, would have welcomed such a move. Contributing to officials' opposition to mandatory post-war rationing were the revived ideology of government non-interference; a strong (...)
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  43. Theodor W. Adorno (2003). Can One Live After Auschwitz?: A Philosophical Reader. Stanford University Press.score: 88.2
    This is a comprehensive collection of readings from the work of Theodor Adorno, one of the most influential German thinkers of the twentieth century. What took place in Auschwitz revokes what Adorno termed the “Western legacy of positivity,” the innermost substance of traditional philosophy. The prime task of philosophy then remains to reflect on its own failure, its own complicity in such events. Yet in linking the question of philosophy to historical occurrence, Adorno seems not to have abandoned his paradoxical, (...)
     
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  44. Arjun Appadurai & Carol A. Breckenridge (1995). Aquinas, St. Thomas. Introduction to St. Thomas Aquinas. Ed. Anton C. Pegis. New York: Modem Library. 1945 Arac, Jonathan. Critical Genealogies: Historical Situations for Postmodern Literary Studies-New York: Columbia UP, 1987 Arendt, Hannah The Origins of Totalitarianism. Cleveland: World Publishing. [REVIEW] In Jeffrey Williams (ed.), Pc Wars: Politics and Theory in the Academy. Routledge. 2--313.score: 87.0
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  45. Michael Forster, The Liberal Temper in Classical German Philosophy: Freedom of Thought and Expression.score: 84.6
    Consideration of the German philosophy and political history of the past century might well give the impression, and often does give foreign observers the impression, that liberalism, including in particular commitment to the ideal of free thought and expression, is only skin-deep in Germany. Were not Heidegger's disgust at Gerede (which of course really meant the free speech of the Weimar Republic) and Gadamer's defense of "prejudice" and "tradition" more reflective of the true instincts of German philosophy than, say, the (...)
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  46. Mayer A.-K. (2000). Setting Up a Discipline: Conflicting Agendas of the Cambridge History of Science Committee, 1936-1950. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 31 (4):665-689.score: 84.6
    Traditionally the domain of scientists, the history of science became an independent field of inquiry only in the twentieth century and mostly after the Second World War. This process of emancipation was accompanied by a historiographical departure from previous, 'scientistic' practices, a transformation often attributed to influences from sociology, philosophy and history. Similarly, the liberal humanists who controlled the Cambridge History of Science Committee after 1945 emphasized that their contribution lay in the special expertise they, as trained historians, brought (...)
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  47. Soshichi Uchii, The Responsibility of the Scientist.score: 84.6
    The problems of the social responsibility of the scientist became a subject of public debate after the World War II in Japan, thanks to the activities and publications of Yukawa and Tomonaga. And such authors as J. Karaki, M.Taketani, Y. Murakami, and S. Fujinaga continued discussion in their books. However, many people seem to be still unaware of the most important source of these problems. As I see it, one of the most important treatments of these problems was the (...)
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  48. Justin Leiber, Alan Mathison Turing: The Maker of Our Age.score: 84.6
    In his short life, Alan Turing (1912-1954) made foundational contributions to philosophy, mathematics, biology, artificial intelligence, and computer science. He, as much as anyone, invented the digital electronic computer. From September, 1939 much of his work on computation was war-driven and brutally practical. He developed high speed computing devices needed to decipher German Enigma Machine messages to and from U-boats, countering the most serious threat by far to Britain's survival during World War Two. Yet few people have an image (...)
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  49. Peter Schneck (2004). Paul Konitzer (1894–1947): Hygieniker, Amtsarzt, Sozialmediziner, Gesundheitspolitiker. NTM International Journal of History and Ethics of Natural Sciences, Technology and Medicine 12 (4):213-232.score: 84.6
    Paul Konitzer was one of the outstanding and well-known physicians in the years after the World War II in East-Germany. The paper describes his professional way as hygienist, social medical, municipal physician and last but not least as health politician in the times of four different political regimes: the imperial era in Germany till 1918, the time of Weimarer Republic till 1933, the Nazi dictatorship till 1945 and the early years in the Soviet occupation zone of Germany. The life (...)
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  50. François Godard (2011). Enchanting Social Democracy: The Resilience of a Belief System. Critical Review 23 (4):475-494.score: 84.6
    Abstract Marcel Gauchet's theory of democracy focuses on the secularization of Western societies and the emergence of ?autonomy? in them?Weber's ?disenchantment of the world.? The nineteenth-century liberalism that resulted failed to generate a sense of collective purpose that could fill the gap left by the retreat of religion. Totalitarian ideologies achieved this by harnessing the passions unleashed by World War I, but at the cost of radicalization. Conversely, the (unexpected and lasting) post-1945 ?social state? set the groundwork for (...)
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