Search results for 'World War, 1939-1945 Rescue' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  10
    Helmut Burckhardt (1974). The Second World War 1939–1945. Philosophy and History 7 (2):219-220.
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  2. Brian Holden Reid (1989). War at Any Price: World War II in Europe, 1939–1945. History of European Ideas 10 (6):734-735.
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  3.  34
    Norman Geras (1995). Solidarity in the Conversation of Humankind: The Ungroundable Liberalism of Richard Rorty. Verso.
    Introduction This book aims at continuing a conversation. It takes for interlocutor a writer who is himself today indefatigable in engaging with the ideas ...
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  4. Dirk Heinrichs (2007). Was Besagt Vergessen & Erinnern des Guten? Edition Temmen.
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  5.  30
    David Williams (2004). Defending Japan's Pacific War: The Kyoto School Philosophers and Post-White Power. Routledgecurzon.
    This book puts forward a revisionist view of Japanese wartime thinking. It seeks to explore why Japanese intellectuals, historians and philosophers of the time insisted that Japan had to turn its back on the West and attack the United States and the British Empire. Based on a close reading of the texts written by members of the highly influential Kyoto School, and revisiting the dialogue between the Kyoto School and the German philosopher Heidegger, it argues that the work of Kyoto (...)
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  6. D. R. Davies (1940). The Two Humanities an Attempt at a Christian Interpretation of History in the Light of War. James Clarke.
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  7. Jean Paul Sartre & Arlette Elkaïm-Sartre (1995). Carnets de la Drôle de Guerre Septembre 1939-Mars 1940.
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  8. Jean Paul Sartre (1983). Les Carnets de la Drôle de Guerre Novembre 1939-Mars 1940.
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  9. Bob Moore (2010). The Treatment of Prisoners of War In The Western European Theatre of War 1939-1945. In Sibylle Scheipers (ed.), Prisoners in War. OUP Oxford
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  10.  5
    Michael Geyer (1977). Peace Initiatives and Power Politics in the Second World War, 1939–1942. Philosophy and History 10 (2):226-229.
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  11. R. M. Swain (2002). A War To Be Won: Fighting the Second World War, 1937-1945. By Williamson Murray and Allan R. Millett. The European Legacy 7 (4):531-531.
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  12.  9
    Erich Gaenschalz (1990). The Destruction of Europe. Essays on the World War Era, 1914–1945. Philosophy and History 23 (2):169-170.
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  13.  6
    Thomas Stamm-Kuhlmann (1990). Synagogues in Hesse. What has Happened Since 1945? A Documentation and Analysis From All 221 Towns in Hesse Whose Synagogue Buildings Survived the Pogrom Night of 1938 and the Second World War. [REVIEW] Philosophy and History 23 (2):153-154.
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  14.  8
    John Stanley Wozniak (1972). Hitler's Dictatorship Until the Beginning of The Second World War, 1933 to 1939. Philosophy and History 5 (2):204-205.
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  15.  5
    Wilhelm Sommerlad (1978). The Beginning of the War, 1939. Unleashing or Outbreak of the Second World War? Philosophy and History 11 (2):224-226.
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  16.  13
    A. W. Gomme (1947). Thucydides Louis E. Lord: Thucydides and the World War. (Martin Classical Lectures, Vol. XII.) Pp. Xiv+300. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press (London: Oxford University Press), 1945. Cloth, 20s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 61 (02):53-54.
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  17.  1
    Russell B. Olwell (1996). The Plutonium Story: The Journals of Professor Glenn T. Seaborg, 1939-1946Glenn Theodore Seaborg Ronald L. Kathren Jerry B. Gough Gary T. BenefielWorking on the Bomb: An Oral History of World War II HanfordS. L. Sanger Craig Wollner. [REVIEW] Isis 87 (4):753-754.
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  18.  2
    Helmut Rumpler (1983). Europe and World Politics in the Post-War Years, 1945–1963. Philosophy and History 16 (1):63-64.
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  19.  1
    Erwin Hölzle (1970). Germany's Armament in the Second World War. Hitler's Conferences with Albert Speer 1942–1945. Philosophy and History 3 (1):69-70.
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  20. Chris Lorenz & R. J. B. Bosworth (1996). Explaining Auschwitz and Hiroshima: History Writing and the Second World War 1945-1990. History and Theory 35 (2):234.
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  21. Ronald Rainger (2001). Science and the Pacific War: Science and Survival in the Pacific, 1939-1945 by Roy M. MacLeod. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 92:219-220.
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  22. Karl Jaspers (2008). The Question of German Guilt. In Guénaël Mettraux (ed.), Perspectives on the Nuremberg Trial. OUP Oxford
     
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  23.  40
    George J. Annas & Michael A. Grodin (1992). The Nazi Doctors and the Nuremberg Code Human Rights in Human Experimentation. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  24. Gereon Wolters (2004). Vertuschung, Anklage, Rechtfertigung: Impromptus Zum Rückblick der Deutschen Philosophie Auf Das "Dritte Reich". University Press.
    This booklet deals in the form of "impromptus" with philosophy and philosophers in the "Third Reich" and the interesting story of post-war German philosophy to just ignore this topic.
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  25.  35
    John David Skrentny (1998). The Effect of the Cold War on African-American Civil Rights: America and the World Audience, 1945–1968. Theory and Society 27 (2):237-285.
  26. Jean Paul Sartre & Eric Sutton (2001). The Age of Reason. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  27. Gabriel Kolko (1969). The Politics of War. The World and United States Policy 1943-1945. Science and Society 33 (4):471-473.
     
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  28. Arthur L. Caplan & Lynn Gillam (1996). When Medicine Went Mad: Bioethics and the Holocaust. Bioethics 10 (2):180-181.
     
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  29. Fredo Arias de la Canal (2007). El Por Qué de Las Dos Guerras Mundiales. Frente de Afirmación Hispanista.
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  30. F. R. Barry (1940). Faith in Dark Ages. London, Student Christian Movement Press.
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  31. Laurel Bosshart & Carl Mitcham (1999). Jintai Jikken and Unit 731.
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  32. William Brennan (1980). Medical Holocausts. Nordland Pub. International.
    v. 1. Exterminative medicine in Nazi Germany and contemporary America -- v. 2. The language of exterminative medicine in Nazi Germany and contemporary America.
     
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  33. D. R. Davies (1940). The Two Humanities. [London]J. Clarke & Co., Ltd..
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  34. Kumiko Ishikawa (2009). "Yowasa" to "Teikō" No Kindai Kokugaku: Senjika No Yanagita Kunio, Yasuda Yojūrō, Orikuchi Shinobu. Kōdansha.
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  35. N. N. Kazanskiĭ (ed.) (2005). Lingvistika V Gody Voĭny--Li͡udi, Sudʹby, Svershenii͡a: Materialy Vserossiĭskoĭ Konferent͡sii, Posvi͡ashchennoĭ 60-Letii͡u Pobedy V Velikoĭ Otechestvennoĭ Voĭne. Nauka.
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  36. Philippe Soulez & Jonathan Barnes (1992). La Guerre Et les Philosophes de la Fin des Années 20 aux Années 50.
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  37. Peter Steinfels & Carol Levine (eds.) (1976). Biomedical Ethics and the Shadow of Nazism: A Conference on the Proper Use of the Nazi Analogy in Ethical Debate, April 8, 1976. The Center.
     
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  38. Kōji Tanaka (2009). Motoori Norinaga No Dai Tōa Sensō. Perikansha.
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  39.  1
    Harold H. Titus (1943). What is a Mature Morality? New York, the Macmillan Company.
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  40.  38
    Patrick Petitjean (2008). The Joint Establishment of the World Federation of Scientific Workers and of UNESCO After World War II. Minerva 46 (2):247-270.
    The World Federation of Scientific Workers (WFScW) and UNESCO share roots in the Social Relations of Science (SRS) movements and in the Franco-British scientific relations which developed in the 1930s. In this historical context (the Great Depression, the rise of Fascism and the Nazi use of science, the social and intellectual fascination for the USSR), a new model of scientific internationalism emerged, where science and politics mixed. Many progressive scientists were involved in the war efforts against Nazism, and tried (...)
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  41.  4
    Howard Brody, Sarah Leonard, Jing-bao Nie & Paul Weindling (2014). U.S. Responses To Japanese Wartime Inhuman Experimentation After World War Ii: National Security and Wartime Exigency. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (2):220-230.
    In 1945–46, representatives of the U.S. government made similar discoveries in both Germany and Japan, unearthing evidence of unethical experiments on human beings that could be viewed as war crimes. The outcomes in the two defeated nations, however, were strikingly different. In Germany, the United States, influenced by the Canadian physician John Thompson, played a key role in bringing Nazi physicians to trial and publicizing their misdeeds. In Japan, the United States played an equally key role in concealing information about (...)
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  42.  6
    Andrzej Friszke (2006). Polish Democratic Thought in the Occupied Country 1939–1945. Dialogue and Universalism 16 (7-9):79-87.
    Political thought of the war and occupation period continued the ideological and program searches started already before 1939. The concept of democracy was mostly associated with the values such as individual freedom, civil rights, safety of citizens, society of the state; cooperation among nations in the fields of politics, economy and protection of peace. The author deals with topics like: democratic international order; democratic political order and economic system. The author concludes the article with a few synthesizing remarks.
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  43.  10
    Matthis Krischel (2010). Perceived Hereditary Effect of World War I: A Study of the Positions of Friedrich von Bernhardi and Vernon Kellogg. [REVIEW] Medicine Studies 2 (2):139-150.
    This paper explores the question whether war was regarded as eugenic or dysgenic before, during and after the First World War. The main focus is on the positions of the German military officer and historian Friedrich von Bernhardi, who in Germany and the Next War, first published in 1912, argued for war as eugenic, and Vernon Kellogg’s Headquarters Nights, published in 1917, which marks an important work characterizing war as dysgenic. I argue that an international community of biologists and (...)
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  44.  3
    Codruta Cuceu (2010). Identity Under (Re)Construction: The Jewish Community From Transylvania Before and After the Second World War. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 7 (19):30-42.
    When talking about the identity of a certain community, we are inclined to appeal to essentialist, almost metaphysical notions. This often results in a unitary, deeply rooted and stable perception of the analyzed community. But this view is not always accurate enough, for it does not offer an account of a specific history. By offering a short history and a structural presentation of the Jewish community from Transylvania, before and shortly after the Second World War, our article’s purpose is (...)
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  45.  1
    Jessica Reinisch (2007). A New Beginning? German Medical and Political Traditions in the Aftermath of the Second World War. Minerva 45 (3):241-257.
    After 1945, the German medical community underwent a period of self-examination. The profession’s experience during the Nazi period raised profound questions concerning its ethical integrity and political allegiances. This paper considers the advent of medical nationalism, and shows how, in Berlin and in the Soviet zone of Germany, narratives were constructed to show a new and positive picture of German medicine.
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  46.  7
    Alfred Schmidt (2014). Wittgenstein and World War I: Some Additional Online Sources. Nordic Wittgenstein Review 3 (2):181-186.
    The article presents some additional biographical online sources to Ludwig Wittgenstein in the years 1913-1918.
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  47. Jo Vellacott (1980). Bertrand Russell and the Pacifists in the First World War. St. Martin's Press.
     
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  48.  11
    Virginia Parrott Williams (1987). Surrealism, Quantum Philosophy, and World War I. Garland.
  49. Nolen Gertz (2009). Censorship, Propaganda, and the Production of 'Shell Shock' in World War I. War Fronts: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on War, Virtual War, and Human Security.
    In discussing warfare we tend to maintain a theoretical cleavage between the "home front" and the "battle front" that is supposed to parallel the physical distance that separates them. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the academic literature that surrounds World War I, with each discipline for decades having studied its correspondent aspect of the war. While this has provided us with incredibly detailed research into the minutiae of battles and the changing attitudes of the masses, it has (...)
     
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  50.  5
    Roy R. Behrens (2016). Setting the Stage for Deception. Perspective Distortion in World War I Camouflage. Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 9 (2):31-42.
    During World War I, in response to substantial advancements in wartime surveillance, it became a common practice to rely on “vision specialists” to devise effective methods of fooling the enemy. These methods, collectively referred to now as camouflage, were designed by so-called camoufleurs, men who in civilian life had been trained as artists, graphic designers, architects, and theatre scenographers. Among the techniques they employed were perspective-based spatial distortions, of the sort that are also frequently used in theatrical set design, (...)
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