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Stephen Wright [14]Sarah Wright [11]Steve Wright [9]Sewall Wright [5]
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Profile: Stephen Wright (University of Sheffield)
Profile: Stephen Wright (Oxford University)
Profile: Sarah Wright (University of Georgia)
Profile: Sarah Wright (Birkbeck College)
Profile: Sally Wright (Sheridan College)
Profile: Scott Wright (University of Utah)
Profile: Sharon Wright (Open University (UK))
Profile: Sophia Wright
Profile: Selah Wright (University of Tennessee, Knoxville)
  1. Sheila Wright (2006). Teacher as Public Art. Journal of Aesthetic Education 40 (2):83-104.
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  2. Steve Wright (1982). Reviews : Dan Clawson, Bureaucracy and the Labour Process: The Transformation of U.S. Industry 1860-1920, (Monthly Review Press 1980). [REVIEW] Thesis Eleven 4 (1):204-207.
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  3.  24
    Stephen Wright (2014). Sosa on Knowledge From Testimony. Analysis 74 (2):249-254.
    Ernest Sosa has recently argued that the knowledge we get from instruments and the knowledge we get from testimony is similar in important ways. Most importantly, the justification that supports it is similar in kind – both instrumental justification and justification from testimony is to be understood in terms of reliability. I argue that Sosa’s theory is problematic. Specifically, I argue that we can take certain attitudes towards people that we cannot coherently take towards instruments. This, I argue, grounds a (...)
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  4.  22
    Stephen Wright (2016). Internalism in the Epistemology of Testimony. Erkenntnis 81 (1):69-86.
    This paper objects to internalist theories of justification from testimony on the grounds that they can’t accommodate intuitions about a pair of cases. The pair of cases involved is a testimonial version of the cases involved in the New Evil Demon Argument. The role of New Evil Demon cases in motivating contemporary internalist theories of knowledge and justification notwithstanding, it is argued here that testimonial cases make an intuitive case against internalist theories of justification from testimony.
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  5.  35
    Stephen Wright (2015). In Defence of Transmission. Episteme 12 (1):13-28.
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  6.  10
    Stephen Wright (2014). Sincerity and Transmission. Ratio 28 (1):42-56.
    According to some theories of testimonial knowledge, testimony can allow you, as a knowing speaker, to transmit your knowledge to me. A question in the epistemology of testimony concerns whether or not the acquisition of testimonial knowledge depends on the speaker's testimony being sincere. In this paper, I outline two notions of sincerity and argue that, construed in a certain way, transmission theorists should endorse the claim that the acquisition of testimonial knowledge requires sincerity.
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  7. Steve Wright (2005). Book Review: From Left Communism to Post-Modernism: Reconsidering Emancipatory Discourse. [REVIEW] Thesis Eleven 81 (1):109-115.
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  8.  22
    Stephen Wright (2016). The Transmission of Knowledge and Justification. Synthese 193 (1):293-311.
    This paper explains how the notion of justification transmission can be used to ground a notion of knowledge transmission. It then explains how transmission theories can characterise schoolteacher cases, which have prominently been presented as counterexamples to transmission theories.
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  9. Steven Wright (1980). Left Communism in Australia: J.A. Dawson and the "Southern Advocate for Workers' Councils". Thesis Eleven 1 (1):43-77.
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  10.  10
    Stephen Wright (forthcoming). Circular Testimony. Philosophical Studies.
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  11.  63
    Sarah Wright (2010). Virtues, Social Roles, and Contextualism. Metaphilosophy 41 (1):95-114.
    : Contextualism in epistemology has been proposed both as a way to avoid skepticism and as an explanation for the variability found in our use of "knows." When we turn to contextualism to perform these two functions, we should ensure that the version we endorse is well suited for these tasks. I compare two versions of epistemic contextualism: attributor contextualism and methodological contextualism. I argue that methodological contextualism is superior both in its response to skepticism and in its mechanism for (...)
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  12. Stephen Wright (2010). Trust and Trustworthiness. Philosophia 38 (3):615-627.
    What is it to trust someone? What is it for someone to be trustworthy? These are the two main questions that this paper addresses. There are various situations that can be described as ones of trust, but this paper considers the issue of trust between individuals. In it, I suggest that trust is distinct from reliance or cases where someone asks for something on the expectation that it will be done due to the different attitude taken by the trustor. I (...)
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  13.  53
    Stephen Wright (2013). Does Klein's Infinitism Offer a Response to Agrippa's Trilemma? Synthese 190 (6):1113-1130.
    The regress of reasons threatens an epistemic agent’s right to claim that any beliefs are justified. In response, Peter Klein’s infinitism argues that an infinite series of supporting reasons of the right type not only is not vicious but can make for epistemic justification. In order to resist the sceptic, infinitism needs to provide reason to think that there is at least one justified belief in the world. Under an infinitist conception this involves showing that at least one belief is (...)
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  14.  12
    Richard J. Bonnie, Stephanie Wright & Kelly K. Dineen (2008). Legal Authority to Preserve Organs in Cases of Uncontrolled Cardiac Death: Preserving Family Choice. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 36 (4):741-751.
    The gap between the number of organs available for transplant and the number of individuals who need transplanted organs continues to increase. At the same time, thousands of transplantable organs are needlessly overlooked every year for the single reason that they come from individuals who were declared dead according to cardio pulmonary criteria. Expanding the donor population to individuals who die uncontrolled cardiac deaths will reduce this disparity, but only if organ preservation efforts are utilized. Concern about potential legal liability (...)
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  15.  30
    Sarah Wright (2009). The Proper Structure of the Intellectual Virtues. Southern Journal of Philosophy 47 (1):91-112.
    If we adopt a virtue approach to epistemology, what form should the intellectual virtues take? In this paper, I argue that the proper structure of the intellectual virtues should be one that follows the tradition of internalism in epistemology. I begin by giving a general characterization of virtue epistemology and then define internalism within that framework. Arguing for internalism, I first consider the thought experiment of the new evil demon and show how externalist accounts of intellectual virtue, though constructed to (...)
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  16.  53
    Sarah Wright (2010). Internalist Virtues and Knowledge. Acta Analytica 25 (2):119-132.
    What role can intellectual virtues play in an account of knowledge when we interpret those virtues internalistically, i.e., as depending only on internal states of the cognizer? Though it has been argued that internalist virtues are ill suited to play any role in an account of knowledge, I will show that, on the contrary, internalist virtues can play an important role in recent accounts of knowledge developed to utilize externalist virtues. The virtue account of knowledge developed by Linda Zagzebski is (...)
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  17.  13
    Sarah Wright (2013). A Neo‐Stoic Approach to Epistemic Agency. Philosophical Issues 23 (1):262-275.
    What is the best model of epistemic agency for virtue epistemology? Insofar as the intellectual and moral virtues are similar, it is desirable to develop models of agency that are similar across the two realms. Unlike Aristotle, the Stoics present a model of the virtues on which the moral and intellectual virtues are unified. The Stoics’ materialism and determinism also help to explain how we can be responsible for our beliefs even when we cannot believe otherwise. In this paper I (...)
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  18.  15
    Sarah Wright (2011). Knowledge and Social Roles: A Virtue Approach. Episteme 8 (1):99-111.
    Attributor contextualism and subject-sensitive invariantism both suggest ways in which our concept of knowledge depends on a context. Both offer approaches that incorporate traditionally non-epistemic elements into our standards for knowledge. But neither can account for the fact that the social role of a subject affects the standards that the subject must meet in order to warrant a knowledge attribution. I illustrate the dependence of the standards for knowledge on the social roles of the knower with three types of examplesand (...)
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  19. Richard J. Bonnie, Stephanie Wright & Kelly K. Dineen (2008). Legal Authority to Preserve Organs in Cases of Uncontrolled Cardiac Death: Preserving Family Choice. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (4):741-751.
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  20.  12
    Sarah Wright (2015). Comments on “What the Internalist Should Say to the Tortoise". Episteme 12 (2):219-223.
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  21.  50
    Sewall Wright (1953). Gene and Organism. American Naturalist 87 (832):5-18.
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  22.  25
    Stephen Wright (2013). Duncan Pritchard: Epistemological Disjunctivism. [REVIEW] Dialectica 67 (2):252-257.
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  23.  15
    Steve Wright (1981). Book Reviews : 2 Dreamers of the Absolute. Thesis Eleven 3 (1):174-177.
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  24.  41
    Stephen Wright (2010). The Leibniz's Law Problem (For Stage Theory). Metaphysica 11 (2):137-151.
    Stage theorists invoke the idea of counterpart relations to make sense of how objects are able to persist despite their claim that an object is identical with a single instantaneous stage. According to stage theorists, an object persists if and only if it has a later counterpart that bears the appropriate counterpart relation of identity to it. Whilst objects can and do persist, stages cannot and do not. This seems to amount to a refutation of Leibniz’s law. Stage theorists think (...)
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  25.  31
    Sarah Wright (2012). How Boots Befooled the King: Wisdom, Truth, and the Stoics. Acta Analytica 27 (2):113-126.
    Abstract Can the wise person be fooled? The Stoics take a very strong view on this question, holding that the wise person (or sage) is never deceived and never believes anything that is false. This seems to be an implausibly strong claim, but it follows directly from some basic tenets of the Stoic cognitive and psychological world-view. In developing an account of what wisdom really requires, I will explore the tenets of the Stoic view that lead to this infallibilism about (...)
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  26.  28
    Sarah Wright (2011). Invasive Species and the Loss of Beta Diversity. Ethics and the Environment 16 (1):75-98.
    As I travel the highways of Georgia, I am regularly appalled by the ubiquitous presence of kudzu. It covers trees, telephone poles, open swathes of land, and old houses, making many locations indistinguishable from one another; all I can see from the road is a wave of green covering any formerly distinctive markings. Thinking back to the intentional introduction of kudzu to the American southeast, I recognize that those individuals who encouraged the planting of kudzu made a serious mistake.1 Their (...)
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  27.  2
    Samuel Wright (forthcoming). History in the Abstract: ‘Brahman-Ness’ and the Discipline of Nyāya in Seventeenth-Century Vārāṇasī. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-29.
    Over the last fifteen years, studies on Sanskrit intellectual history between the fifteenth and eighteenth centuries have produced a body of scholarship that has fundamentally reshaped our understanding of the period. Yet, despite significant advances in the understanding of the social-historical circumstances of authors and disciplines as well as success in elucidating major features of intellectual thought, a main point of difficultly has been in combining both the intellectuality and sociality of Sanskrit scholars. By examining a debate within the discipline (...)
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  28.  4
    Shelley Wright (1993). Patriarchal Feminism and the Law of the Father. Feminist Legal Studies 1 (2):115-140.
  29.  32
    David Schmidtz & Sarah Wright (2004). What Nozick Did for Decision Theory. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 28 (1):282–294.
  30.  10
    Stephen Wright (2013). Diego E. Machuca (Ed.), Disagreement and Skepticism. [REVIEW] Mind 122 (488):1157-1160.
  31.  2
    Sue Wright (2015). What is Language? A Response to Philippe van Parijs. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 18 (2):113-130.
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  32.  14
    Stephen Wright (2013). Benjamin McMyler: Testimony, Trust, and Authority. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 78 (5):1213-1217.
  33.  15
    Sewall Wright (1964). Biology and the Philosophy of Science. The Monist 48 (2):265-288.
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  34.  1
    Susannah Wright & Stephanie Wilde (forthcoming). Supporting Student Transitions 14–19. Approaches to Teaching and Learning. By John Bostock and Jane Wood. Pp 140 + Xi. London and New York: Routledge. 2015. £26.00 , £95.00 . ISBN 978-0-415-82286-2 , ISBN 978-0-415-82287-9. [REVIEW] British Journal of Educational Studies:1-3.
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  35.  7
    Stephen Wright (2002). Ouest Lumière : une entreprise artistique à l'ère du travail immatériel. Rue Descartes 4 (4):102-111.
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  36.  5
    Dale Tweedie, Maria Cadiz Dyball, James Hazelton & Sue Wright (2013). Teaching Global Ethical Standards: A Case and Strategy for Broadening the Accounting Ethics Curriculum. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 115 (1):1-15.
    This paper advocates inclusion of a wider set of ethical theories into the accounting canon. We find that the mainstream accounting curriculum does not adequately engage with non-Western ethical theories or contemporary Western ethical thought, as evidenced by the ethics content of core accounting texts and the International Federation of Accountants’ ethics publications. We suggest adopting a ‘thematic’ approach to teaching ethics as an integrated part of accounting curricula. This approach addresses two competing principles implicit in International Education Standard 4: (...)
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  37. Sewall Wright (1959). Physiological Genetics, Ecology of Populations, and Natural Selection. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 3 (1):107-151.
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  38.  12
    Steve Wright (2008). Mapping Pathways Within Italian Autonomist Marxism: A Preliminary Survey. Historical Materialism 16 (4):111-140.
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  39.  10
    Susan Wright (2001). Legitimating Genetic Engineering. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 44 (2):235-247.
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  40.  11
    Steve Wright (2004). On Futuro anteriore. Dai 'Quaderni Rossi' ai movimenti globali: ricchezze e limiti dell'operaismo italiano, edited by G. Borio, F. Pozzi & G. Roggero, and F. Berardi's La nefasta utopia di Potere operaio. Lavoro tecnica movimento nel laboratorio politico del Sessantotto italiano. [REVIEW] Historical Materialism 12 (1):261-276.
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  41.  10
    David Schmidtz & Sarah Wright (2008). What Nozick Did for Decision Theory. In Person, Polis, Planet: Essays in Applied Philosophy. Oxford University Press 282-294.
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  42.  3
    Steve Wright (2005). Violent Peacekeeping: The Rise and Rise of Repressive Techniques and Technologies. Politics and Ethics Review 1 (1):60-69.
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  43.  2
    E. Eve Esslinger, Charles P. Schade, Cynthia K. Sun, Ying Hua Sun, Jill Manna, Bethany Knowles Hall, Shanen Wright, Karen L. Hannah & Janet R. Lynch (2014). Exploratory Analysis of the Relationship Between Home Health Agency Engagement in a National Campaign and Reduction in Acute Care Hospitalization in US Home Care Patients. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 20 (5):664-670.
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  44.  2
    S. Wright (2000). `A Love Born of Hate': Autonomist Rap in Italy. Theory, Culture and Society 17 (3):117-135.
    Perhaps the most distinctive aspect of Italian-language rap in the 1990s has been the close association of some popular performers with the nation's radical Left. Through a critical reading of the imagery, lyrics and other writings of two of Italy's best known rap bands, this essay seeks to explore the tensions between cultural labour and political commitment in the social centres movement.
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  45.  4
    Steve Wright (2011). Beyond a Bad Attitude? Journal of Information Ethics 20 (2):127-156.
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  46.  2
    Steve Wright (2012). The Creator Sings: A Wesleyan Rethinking of Transcendence with Robert Jenson. Heythrop Journal 53 (6):972-982.
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  47. Stephen Wright (2013). Duncan Pritchard, Epistemological Disjunctivism, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012, Vii+170 Pp. GBP 22.50 , ISBN 9780199557912. [REVIEW] Dialectica 67 (2):252-257.
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  48. Susan T. H. Wright & Donald W. Taylor (1949). Distributed Practice in Verbal Learning and the Maturation Hypothesis. Journal of Experimental Psychology 39 (4):527.
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  49. Stephen C. Wright & Lisa M. Bitacola (2012). Echoing the Call to Move “Beyond Prejudice” in Search of Intergroup Equality. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (6):450-451.
    We also critique the myopic focus on prejudice reduction, but we do not support the call for a reconceptualization of prejudice. Redefining key psychological constructs is unproductive. Also, we point to interpersonal dynamics in cross-group interaction as a key mechanism in the prejudice reduction/collective action paradox and point to solutions involving intrapersonal/interpersonal processes, as well as broader structural intergroup relations.
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  50. Sarah Wright (2011). Hume on Testimony: A Virtue-Theoretic Defense. History of Philosophy Quarterly 28 (3):247.
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