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  1. Xinzhong Yao (2013). International Workshop “Comparative Philosophy: Approaches and Methodologies”. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (S1):275-275.
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  2. Xinzhong Yao (2013). Philosophy of Learning in Wang Yangming and Francis Bacon. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (3-4):417-435.
    This article is a comparative study of the philosophical views on learning and learning methods elaborated by Wang Yangming and Francis Bacon. It argues that as different criteria for the advancement of learning Bacon's empirical learning and Wang's “learning of the heart-mind” represent two different philosophical orientations, and are responsible, at least partially, for laying down the basis for the parting ways of China and Europe at the dawn of the modern era. It concludes that an appreciation of the mutual (...)
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  3. Xinzhong Yao (2013). The Way of Harmony in the Four Books. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (2):252-268.
    This article is to examine the way of harmony that is initiated in the Analects of Confucius, and further elaborated in the other three of the Four Books. It will argue that the Confucian harmony is a philosophy defining the relation between the self and the other and among the elements of the unity, that it is a way of living and behaving that leads to modesty and flexibility, and that it is a moral process starting from the self and (...)
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  4. Xinzhong Yao (2012). The Way, Virtue, and Practical Skills in the Analects. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (1):26-43.
    This article is intended to investigate how the concept of the Way (dao) is applied in the Analects of Confucius both as a universal norm and as a practical application in association with other concepts, virtue (de) on the one hand, and ability or skill (neng) or method (fang) on the other. Through a synthetic reconstruction of these concepts, it will come to the conclusion that the Way, virtue, and practical skills are the three central and mutually interpreted themes in (...)
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  5. Xinzhong Yao (2012). Introduction: Conceptualizing Virtues in the Analects of Confucius. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (1):3-7.
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  6. Xinzhong Yao & Weiming Tu (eds.) (2010). Confucian Studies: Critical Concepts in Asian Philosophy. Routledge.
    v. 1. Reassessing Confucian traditions -- v. 2. Reinterpreting Confucian ideas -- v. 3. Reconstructing Confucian ethics -- v. 4. Reappraising Confucian ideals.
     
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  7. Xinzhong Yao (2008). The Confucian Self and Experiential Spirituality. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (4):393-406.
    Since the publication of his book on Zhongyong (Tu 1976), Tu Weiming has worked for more than 30 years on an anthropocosmic reconstruction of the Confucian universe, in which self-transformation is defined both as the starting point and as the necessary vehicle for one’s spiritual journey. This article is primarily intended to examine Tu’s attempts to reconstruct Confucian spirituality but further to take a step forward to argue that in the spiritual world as construed by Confucius and Mencius, the (...)
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  8. Xinzhong Yao (2006). From "What is Below" to "What is Above": A Confucian Discourse on Wisdom. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 33 (3):349-363.
  9. Xinzhong Yao (2006). Introduction: Wisdom in Comparative Perspectives. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 33 (3):319–321.
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  10. Xinzhong Yao (2006). Knowledge, Virtue, and Joyfulness: Confucian Wisdom Revisited. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 5 (2):273-292.
  11. Xinzhong Yao (2005). Knowledge and Interpretation: A Hermeneutical Study of Wisdom in Early Confucian and Israelite Traditions. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32 (2):297–311.
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  12. Xinzhong Yao (1996). Confucianism and Christianity: A Comparative Study of Jen and Agape. Distributed in the U.S. By International Specialized Bk. Services.
    The underlying idea presented in this book is that there are similarities as well as differences between Confucianism as Humanistic tradition and Christianity ...
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  13. Xinzhong Yao (1996). Self-Construction and Identity: The Confucian Self in Relation to Some Western Perceptions. Asian Philosophy 6 (3):179 – 195.
    Abstract In contrast to the metaphysical, epistemological and psychological understandings of the self traditionally held and today still extensively considered in the West, the self in Confucianism is essentially an ethical concept, representing a holistic view of humanhood and a continuingly constructive process driven by self?cultivation and moral orientations. This paper first examines what is literally and philosophically meant by the self in these two traditions, then examines the contrasts or comparisons between the Confucian conception of the self and the (...)
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  14. Xinzhong Yao (1995). Jen , Love and Universality—Three Arguments Concerning Jen in Confucianism. Asian Philosophy 5 (2):181 – 195.
    Abstract Universality, rather than partiality, is the characteristic of Confucian jen. This article puts forward three arguments to clarify confusion of interpretation: (1) that jen, rather than shu, is the main thread running through the whole system of Confucianism, and that by its two procedures of chung and shu, it presents itself as an integration of one's self with others; (2) that jen, as love, does not signify a natural preference, but an ethical refinement of an ordinary feeling of fondness, (...)
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