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Y. Michael Barilan [26]Y. M. Barilan [8]
  1. Y. Michael Barilan (forthcoming). From Hope in Palliative Care to Hope as a Virtue and a Life Skill. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (3):165-181.
    For centuries, it has been held that communication of an ominous prognosis has the power to kill patients and that the cultivation of hope, even when deceitful, may expedite recovery (Faden, Beauchamp, and King 1986, 63). Today, truth is considered a higher value than the pleasantness of no-worry. Research shows that patients want to be told the truth and that informed patients do not die prematurely; rather, they fare better psychologically than those kept behind a veil of silence. We also (...)
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  2. Y. Michael Barilan (forthcoming). Hope and Friendship: Being and Having. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (3):191-195.
    In its first part, the paper explores the challenge of conceptualizing the Thomist theological virtue of hope in Aristotelian terms that are compatible with non-Thomist and even atheist metaphysics as well. I argue that the key concept in this endeavor is friendship—as an Aristotelian virtue, as relational value in Thomist theology, as a recognized value in supportive care and as a kind of ‘personal hope.’ Then, the paper proceeds to examine the possible differences between hope as a virtue and hope (...)
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  3. Y. M. Barilan & M. Brusa (2013). Deliberation at the Hub of Medical Education: Beyond Virtue Ethics and Codes of Practice. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (1):3-12.
    Although both codes of practice and virtue ethics are integral to the ethos and history of “medical professionalism”, the two trends appear mutually incompatible. Hence, in the first part of the paper we explore and explicate this apparent conflict and seek a direction for medical education. The theoretical and empirical literature indicates that moral deliberation may transcend the incompatibilities between the formal and the virtuous, may enhance moral and other aspects of personal sensitivity, may help design and improve other parts (...)
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  4. Y. M. Barilan (2012). Ulysses Contracts and the Nocebo Effect. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (3):37-39.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 3, Page 37-39, March 2012.
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  5. Y. M. Barilan (2011). Respect for Personal Autonomy, Human Dignity, and the Problems of Self-Directedness and Botched Autonomy. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (5):496-515.
    This paper explores the value of respect for personal autonomy in relation to clearly immoral and irrational acts committed freely and intentionally by competent people. Following Berlin's distinction between two kinds of liberty and Darwall's two kinds of respect, it is argued that coercive suppression of nonautonomous, irrational, and self-harming acts of competent persons is offensive to their human dignity, but not disrespectful of personal autonomy. Irrational and immoral choices made by competent people may claim only the negative liberty to (...)
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  6. Y. Michael Barilan & Margherita Brusa (2011). Triangular Reflective Equilibrium: A Conscience-Based Method for Bioethical Deliberation. Bioethics 25 (6):304-319.
    Following a discussion of some historical roots of conscience, we offer a systematized version of reflective equilibrium. Aiming at a comprehensive methodology for bioethical deliberation, we develop an expanded variant of reflective equilibrium, which we call ‘triangular reflective equilibrium’ and which incorporates insights from hermeneutics, critical theory and narrative ethics.We focus on a few distinctions, mainly between methods of justification in ethics and the social practice of bioethical deliberation, between coherence in ethical reasoning, personal integrity and consensus formation, and between (...)
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  7. Y. Michael Barilan (2010). Informed Consent: Between Waiver and Excellence in Responsible Deliberation. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (1):89-95.
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  8. Y. M. Barilan (2009). Judaism, Human Dignity and the Most Vulnerable Women on Earth. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (11):35-37.
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  9. Y. M. Barilan (2009). Responsibility as a Meta-Virtue: Truth-Telling, Deliberation and Wisdom in Medical Professionalism. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (3):153-158.
    The article examines the new discourse on medical professionalism and responsibility through the prism of conflicts among moral values, especially with regard to truth-telling. The discussion is anchored in the renaissance of English-language writing on medical ethics in the 18th century, which paralleled the rise of humanitarianism and the advent of the word “responsibility”. Following an analysis of the meanings of the value of responsibility in general and in medical practice in particular, it is argued that, similarly to the Aristotelian (...)
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  10. Y. Michael Barilan (2009). From Imago Dei in the Jewish-Christian Traditions to Human Dignity in Contemporary Jewish Law. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (3):pp. 231-259.
    The article surveys and analyzes the roles in Judaism of the value of imago Dei/human dignity, especially in bioethical contexts. Two main topics are discussed. The first is a comparative analysis of imago Dei as an anthropological and ethical concept in Jewish and Western thought (Christianity and secular European values). The Jewish tradition highlights the human body and especially its procreative function and external appearance as central to imago Dei. The second is the role of imago Dei as a moral (...)
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  11. Y. Michael Barilan (2009). Nozick's Experience Machine and Palliative Care: Revisiting Hedonism. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (4):399-407.
    In refutation of hedonism, Nozick offered a hypothetical thought experiment, known as the Experience Machine. This paper maintains that end-of-life-suffering of the kind that is resistant to state-of-the-art palliation provides a conceptually equal experiment which validates Nozick’s observations and conclusions. The observation that very many terminal patients who suffer terribly do no wish for euthanasia or terminal sedation is incompatible with motivational hedonism. Although irreversible vegetative state and death are equivalently pain-free, very many people loath the former even at the (...)
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  12. Margherita Brusa & Y. Michael Barilan (2009). Cultural Circumcision in Eu Public Hospitals – an Ethical Discussion. Bioethics 23 (8):470-482.
  13. Y. M. Barilan & M. Brusa (2008). Human Rights and Bioethics. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (5):379-383.
    In the first part of this article we survey the concept of human rights from a philosophical perspective and especially in relation to the “right to healthcare”. It is argued that regardless of meta-ethical debates on the nature of rights, the ethos and language of moral deliberation associated with human rights is indispensable to any ethics that places the victim and the sufferer in its centre. In the second part we discuss the rise of the “right to privacy”, particularly in (...)
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  14. Y. Michael Barilan (2007). Book Review. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 28 (2).
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  15. Y. Michael Barilan (2007). The Doctor by Luke Fildes: An Icon in Context. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 28 (2):59-80.
    This paper discusses one of the most famous paintings on medical themes: The Doctor by Sir Luke Fildes (Fig. 1), which exemplifies how an ideal type of doctoring is construed from reality and from the views and expectations of both the public and doctors themselves. A close reading of The Doctor elucidates three fundamental conflicts in medicine: the first is between statistical efficiency in accordance with scales of morbidity and mortality and the personal devotion that every sick child or suffering (...)
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  16. Y. Michael Barilan (2007). Contemporary Art and the Ethics of Anatomy. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 50 (1):104-123.
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  17. Y. Michael Barilan (2007). The New Israeli Law on the Care of the Terminally Ill: Conceptual Innovations Waiting for Implementation. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 50 (4):557-571.
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  18. Fabrizio Turoldo & Y. Michael Barilan (2007). The Concept of Responsibility: Three Stages in Its Evolution Within Bioethics. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (01):114-123.
    edited by Tuija Takala and Matti Häyry, welcomes contributions on the conceptual and theoretical dimensions of bioethics.
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  19. Y. Michael Barilan (2006). Bodyworlds and the Ethics of Using Human Remains: A Preliminary Discussion. Bioethics 20 (5):233–247.
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  20. Y. Michael Barilan (2006). On the Negative Account of the Self. The Pluralist 1 (2):68 - 87.
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  21. Y. Michael Barilan (2005). The Story of the Body and the Story of the Person: Towards an Ethics of Representing Human Bodies and Body-Parts. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (2):193-205.
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  22. Y. M. Barilan (2004). Is the Clock Ticking for Terminally Ill Patients in Israel? Preliminary Comment on a Proposal for a Bill of Rights for the Terminally Ill. Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (4):353-357.
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  23. Y. Michael Barilan (2004). The Vision of Vegetarianism and Peace: Rabbi Kook on the Ethical Treatment of Animals. History of the Human Sciences 17 (4):69-101.
    Rabbi HaCohen Kook’s essay on vegetarianism and peace, first published in instalments in 1903–4, and reissued 60 years later, is the only treatise in rabbinic Judaism on the relationship between humans and animals. It is here examined as central to his ethical beliefs. His writings, shaped by his background as rabbi and mystic, illuminate the history of environmental and applied ethics. A century ago, he perceived the main challenge that confronts reform movements: multiculturalism.
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  24. Y. Michael Barilan (2004). Medicine Through the Artist's Eyes: Before, During, and After the Holocaust. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 47 (1):110-134.
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  25. Y. Michael Barilan (2004). Towards a Dialogue Between Utilitarianism and Medicine. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7 (2):163-173.
    Utilitarianism focuses on the optimization of personal well being in ways that seems to make the practice of medicine irrelevant to the well being of the practitioners, unless given external incentives such as money or honor. Care based on indirect incentives is considered inferior to care motivated internally. This leads to the paradox of utilitarian care. Following Nozick's conceptual Pleasure Machine it is argued that in addition to the promotion of personal well being, people care about fulfilling their well being (...)
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  26. Y. M. Barilan (2003). Abtreibung, Verstümmelung und Umweltethik. Ethik in der Medizin 15 (4):282-294.
    In dieser Arbeit werden drei Gedankenexperimente geprüft, die im Diskurs zur Moralität der Abtreibung vorgebracht wurden: der Geiger von Judith J. Thomson und zwei Erwiderungen darauf von Kenneth Himma und Christopher H. Conn. Sie sind dadurch charakterisiert, dass sie von Rechten sprechen, eine besondere Betonung auf Verkörperung legen und an die moralische Intuition appellieren. Ich behaupte, dass nur menschliche Individuen Menschenrechte haben können und dass Individuation nicht auf der Verletzung der moralischen Rechte anderer basieren kann. Deshalb kann der Fetus weder (...)
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  27. Y. Michael Barilan (2003). One or Two: An Examination of the Recent Case of the Conjoined Twins From Malta. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 28 (1):27 – 44.
    The article questions the assumption that conjoined twins are necessarily two people or persons by employing arguments based on different points of view: non-personal vitalism, the person as a sentient being, the person as an agent, the person as a locus of narrative and valuation, and the person as an embodied mind. Analogies employed from the cases of amputation, multiple personality disorder, abortion, split-brain patients and cloning. The article further questions the assumption that a conjoined twin's natural interest and wish (...)
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  28. Y. Michael Barilan (2003). Revisiting the Problem of Jewish Bioethics: The Case of Terminal Care. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 13 (2):141-168.
    : This paper examines the main Jewish sources relevant to end-of-life ethics, two Talmudic stories, the early modern code of law (Shulhan Aruch), and contemporary Halakhaic (religious law) responsa. Some Orthodox rabbis object to the use of artificial life support that prolongs the life of a dying patient and permit its active discontinuation when the patient is suffering. Other rabbis believe that every medical measure must be taken in order to prolong life. The context of the discussion is the recent (...)
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  29. Y. Michael Barilan (2003). The Israeli Bioethical Discourse and the Steinberg Report Regarding a Proposed Bill of Rights of the Terminally Ill. Ethik in der Medizin 15 (1):59-62.
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  30. Y. Michael Barilan (2002). Head-Counting Vs. Heart-Counting: An Examination of the Recent Case of the Conjoined Twins From Malta. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 45 (4):593-603.
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  31. Y. Michael Barilan & Moshe Weintraub (2001). Pantagruelism: A Rabelaisian Inspiration for Understanding Poisoning, Euthanasia and Abortion in the Hippocratic Oath and in Contemporary Clinical Practice. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (3):269-286.
    Contrary to the common view, this paper suggests that the Hippocratic oath does not directly refer to the controversial subjects of euthanasia and abortion. We interpret the oath in the context of establishing trust in medicine through departure from Pantagruelism. Pantagruelism is coined after Rabelais' classic novel Gargantua and Pantagruel. His satire about a wonder herb, Pantagruelion, is actually a sophisticated model of anti-medicine in which absence of independent moral values and of properly conducted research fashion a flagrant over-medicalization of (...)
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  32. Y. Michael Barilan & Moshe Weintraub (2001). Persuasion as Respect for Persons: An Alternative View of Autonomy and of the Limits of Discourse. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (1):13 – 34.
    The article calls for a departure from the common concept of autonomy in two significant ways: it argues for the supremacy of semantic understanding over procedure, and claims that clinicians are morally obliged to make a strong effort to persuade patients to accept medical advice. We interpret the value of autonomy as derived from the right persons have to respect, as agents who can argue, persuade and be persuaded in matters of utmost personal significance such as decisions about medical care. (...)
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  33. Y. Michael Barilan & Moshe Weintraub (2001). The Naturalness of the Artificial and Our Concepts of Health, Disease and Medicine. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (3):311-325.
    This article isolates ten prepositions, which constitute the undercurrent paradigm of contemporary discourse of health disease and medicine. Discussion of the interrelationship between those prepositions leads to a systematic refutation of this paradigm. An alternative set is being forwarded. The key notions of the existing paradigm are that health is the natural condition of humankind and that disease is a deviance from that nature. Natural things are harmonious and healthy while human made artifacts are coercive interference with natural balance. It (...)
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  34. Moshe Weintraub & Y. Michael Barilan (2001). Persuasion as Respect for Persons: An Alternative View of Autonomy and of the Limits of Discourse. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (1):13-34.