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  1. Yaḥyá ibn Ḥabash Suhrawardī (2007). .
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  2. Yahyá ibn Habash Suhrawardi, Henry Corbin & Seyyed Hossein Nasr (1976). Majmu Ah- I Musannafat-I Shayk-I Ishraq. Anjuman-I Shahanshahi-I Falsafah-I Iran.
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  3. Yaḥyá ibn Ḥabash Suhrawardī (1998). Suhrawardi: The Shape of Light: Hayakal Al-Nur. Fons Vitae.
    This treatise on the nature and levels of the human soul considers the limitations of human senses and our true or theomorphic essence; the various realms or Centers, including Absolute Mind as well as Ordinary Mind and Divine Mind; the nature of firmaments; and the meaning of pleasure and pain.
     
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  4. Yaḥyá ibn Ḥabash Suhrawardī (1999). The Philosophical Allegories and Mystical Treatises. Mazda Publishers.
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    Yaḥyá ibn Ḥabash Suhrawardī (2000). The Philosophy of Illumination =. Brigham Young University Press.
    Shihab al-Din al-Suhrawardi was born around 1154, probably in northwestern Iran. Spurred by a dream in which Aristotle appeared to him, he rejected the Avicennan Peripatetic philosophy of his youth and undertook the task of reviving the philosophical tradition of the "Ancients." Suhruwardi's philosophy grants an epistemological role to immediate and atemporal intuition. It is explicitly anti-Peripatetic and is identified with the pre-Aristotelian sages, particularly Plato. The subject of his hikmat al-Ishraq --now available for the first time in English--is the (...)
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