Search results for 'Yiu-Ming To' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  42
    Chen Ming (2009). Modernity and Confucian Political Philosophy in a Globalizing World. Diogenes 56 (1):94-108.
    The scholarship of Confucianism in China is in the process of restoration. Its historical missions are two-fold. It should preserve Chinese national characters and promote China’s modernization. These objectives are partly in conflict with each other. To realize the former objective, it is necessary to stress a historical continuity and consistency, to re-examine and justify the preservation of classical Confucian ideas and values in order to provide spiritual support for Chinese cultural identity and social cohesion. As to the latter objective, (...)
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  2.  20
    Jinglin Li (2006). The Ontologicalization of the Confucian Concept of Xin Xing: Zhou Lianxi's Founding Contribution to the Song-Ming Neo-Confucianism. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (2):204-221.
    The Confucian concept of "cheng" (integrity) emphasizes logical priority of value realization over "zhen shi' (reality or truth). Through value realization and the completion of being, zhenshi can be achieved. Cheng demonstrates the original unity of value and reality. Taking the concept of cheng as the core, Zhou Lianxi's philosophy interpreted yi Dao (the Dao of change), and integrated Yi Jing (The Book of Changes) and Zhong Yong (The Doctrine of the Mean). On the one hand, it ontologicalized the Confucian (...)
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  3.  10
    Zhang Zhiqiang & Huang Deyuan (2009). From the "Alternative School of Principles" to the Lay Buddhism: On the Conceptual Features of Modern Consciousness-Only School From the Perspective of the Evolution of Thought During the Ming and Qing Dynasties. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (1):64 - 87.
    The best representatives of the self-reflection of xinxue 心学 (the School of Mind) and its development during the Ming and Qing Dynasties are the three masters from the late Ming Dynasty. The overall tendency is to shake off the internal constraints of the School of Mind by studying the Confucian classics and history. During the Qing Dynasty, Dai Zhen had attempted to set up a theoretical system based on Confucian classics and history, offering a theoretical foundation for a new academic (...)
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  4.  3
    Pier Jaarsma & Stellan Welin (2015). Autism, Accommodation and Treatment: A Rejoinder to Chong‐Ming Lim's Critique. Bioethics 29 (9):684-685.
    We are very grateful to Chong-Ming Lim for his thoughtful reply published in this journal on one of our articles, which motivated us to think more carefully about accommodating autistic individuals and treating autism. However we believe there are some confusions in Lim's argument. Lim uses the accommodation thesis, according to which we should accommodate autistic individuals rather than treat autism, as the starting point for his reasoning. He claims that if the accommodation thesis is right, then we should not (...)
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  5.  18
    Zhiqiang Zhang (2009). From the “Alternative School of Principles” to the Lay Buddhism: On the Conceptual Features of Modern Consciousness-Only School From the Perspective of the Evolution of Thought During the Ming and Qing Dynasties. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (1):64-87.
    The best representatives of the self-reflection of xinxue 心学 (the School of Mind) and its development during the Ming and Qing Dynasties are the three masters from the late Ming Dynasty. The overall tendency is to shake off the internal constraints of the School of Mind by studying the Confucian classics and history. During the Qing Dynasty, Dai Zhen had attempted to set up a theoretical system based on Confucian classics and history, offering a theoretical foundation for a new academic (...)
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  6. Youngmin Kim (2002). Redefining the Self's Relation to the World: A Study of Mid-Ming Neo-Confucian Discourse. Dissertation, Harvard University
    Neo-Confucianism was a vast intellectual movement that was launched in Song China and that continued to exert great influence in the countries of East Asia, including Japan, Korean and even Vietnam. By the mid-Ming period in China, it found itself in the midst of a major intellectual transformation, undergoing its most lively philosophical effervescence since its formative stage. My dissertation explores the Neo-Confucian discourse of this time. ;Methodologically, I have attempted to overcome various limitations in existing scholarship, which tends to (...)
     
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  7. Qianfang Shen & Jiaxian Qian (2009). The Influences of Yi Chieftains' Intermarriage on Southwestern Area From Ming Dynasty to the Republic of China. Asian Culture and History 1 (1):P31.
    The Yi nationality mainly resides in Yunnan province, Sichuan province and Guizhou province and has a large population. After their antecedents entered into class society, in marriage status, there formed characteristics of inner nationality marriage, outer clan marriage, inner class marriage and trans-family marriage. After the establishment of chieftain system, the level of chieftains appointed by the central kingdom is beyond all other classes and would not marry those of lower classes. They would only marry chieftain families of the same (...)
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  8.  19
    Dermott J. Walsh (2011). The Confucian Roots of Zen No Kenkyū: Nishida's Debt to Wang Yang-Ming in the Search for a Philosophy of Praxis. Asian Philosophy 21 (4):361 - 372.
    This essay takes as its focus Japanese philosopher Nishida Kitar? (1870?1945) and his seminal first text, An Inquiry into the Good (or in Japanese zen no kenky?). Until now scholarship has taken for granted the predominantly Buddhist orientation of this text, centered around an analysis of the central concept of ?pure experience? (junsui keiken) as something Nishdia extrapolates from his early experience of Zen meditation. However, in this paper I will present an alternative and more accurate account of the origins (...)
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  9.  1
    Shaoling Ma (2014). Sinologism: An Alternative to Orientalism and Postcolonialism. By Ming Dong Gu. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 41 (S1):770-774.
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  10.  9
    Julia Ching (1976). To Acquire Wisdom: The Way of Wang Yang-Ming. Columbia University Press.
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  11.  26
    Chung-Ying Cheng (1983). Metaphysics of Tao and Dialectics of Fa: An Evaluation of HTSC in Relations to Lao Tzu and Han Fei and an Analytical Study of Interrelationships of Tao, Fa, Hsing, Ming and Li. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 10 (3):251-284.
  12.  7
    Chün-Fang Yü (1988). Some Ming Buddhist Responses to Neo-Confucianism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 15 (4):371-413.
  13.  29
    Allan W. Anderson (1982). Approaches to the Meaning of Ming, in the I Ching with Particular Reference to Self-Cultivation. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 9 (2):169-195.
  14.  21
    Brook Ziporyn (2011). Response to W U Kuang-Ming. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (3):419-421.
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  15.  19
    L. Stafford Betty (1980). Lianc-Chih, Key to Wang Yang-Ming's Ethical Monism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 7 (2):115-129.
  16.  11
    Henrik H. Sorensen (1986). The "Hsin-Ming" Attributed to Niu-T'ou Fa-Jung. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 13 (1):101-119.
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  17.  19
    Wing-Tsit Chan (1977). Julia Ching, To Acquire Wisdom: The Way of Wang Yang-Ming. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 4 (4):409-416.
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  18.  21
    Kyle David Anderson (2007). Chinese Theories of Reading and Writing: A Route to Hermeneutics and Open Poetics – by Ming Dong Gu. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 34 (4):631–634.
  19.  16
    Robert Magliola (2004). Nagarjuna and Chi-Tsang on the Value of "This World": A Reply to Kuang-Ming Wu's Critique of Indian and Chinese Madhyamika Buddhism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (4):505–516.
  20.  6
    Jesse Fleming (1991). A Response to Kuang-Ming Wu's "Non-World-Making". Journal of Chinese Philosophy 18 (1):51-52.
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  21.  1
    Zilai Zeng (2015). From Zheng He to Koxinga - The Development of the Armed Sea-Merchant Group of Late Ming Dynasty and Their Effort to Defend the Sea-Power. Asian Culture and History 7 (2).
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  22.  2
    Xi Liuqin (2010). Confucians' Repulsion to Buddhism in the Song and Ming Dynasties. Religious Studies 3:027.
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  23.  1
    Tian Haihua (2007). Acculturation of Catholicism to Chinese Traditional Morality in Late Ming: Anti-Concubinage as a Case Study [J]. Religious Studies 4:030.
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  24.  2
    V. A. Uspensky & A. Shen (1995). Review: Ming Li, Paul Vitanyi, An Introduction to Kolmogorov Complexity and its Applications. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 60 (3):1017-1020.
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  25. Steven Burik (2015). Sinologism: An Alternative to Orientalism and Postcolonialism by Ming Dong Gu. Philosophy East and West 65 (3):997-999.
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  26. H. De Dun (1999). Reaction to Professor Chen Lai's' The Concepts of Dao and Li in Song-Ming Neo-Confucian Philosophy'. Contemporary Chinese Thought 30 (4):25-27.
     
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  27. E. Hidverghyova (2000). An Introduction and Annotations to the Slovak Translation of the Essay on the Religion of Good Citizen by the Chinese Philosopher Chung-Ming Ku (1857-1928). [REVIEW] Filozofia 55 (1):47-48.
     
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  28. P. J. Ivanhoe (1978). A Concordance to Wang Yang-Ming,"Chʻuan Hsi Lu": Concordance. Chinese Materials Center.
     
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  29. P. J. Ivanhoe (1978). A Concordance to Wang Yang-Ming, "Chʻuan Hsi Lu": Text. Chinese Materials Center.
     
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  30. Shu-Hsien Liu (2008). Song-Ming Neo-Confucianism (1) : From Cheng Yi to Zhu Xi. In Bo Mou (ed.), Routledge History of Chinese Philosophy. Routledge
     
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  31. Shu-Hsien Liu (2008). Song-Ming Neo-Confucianism (2) : From Lu Jiuyuan to Wang Yang-Ming. In Bo Mou (ed.), Routledge History of Chinese Philosophy. Routledge
     
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  32. Charles MacSherry & Wolfgang Franke (1971). An Introduction to the Sources of Ming History. Journal of the American Oriental Society 91 (4):519.
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  33. Chul-Hong Park (2006). The Meaning of Knowledge-Action Unity with Reference to Innate Knowledge of the Good and Whole Knowledge: An Interchange Between Yang-Ming Wang and John Dewey. Journal of Moral Education 18 (1):205.
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  34. Conrad Schirokauer & Julia Ching (1979). To Acquire Wisdom: The Way of Wang Yang-Ming. Journal of the American Oriental Society 99 (3):485.
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  35. Ma Shaoling (2014). Sinologism: An Alternative to Orientalism and Postcolonialism. By Ming Dong Gu. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 41 (S1):770-774.
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  36. Qianfang Shen & Jiaxian Qian (2009). The Influences of Yi Chieftains’ Intermarriage on Southwestern Area From Ming Dynasty to the Republic of China. Asian Culture and History 1 (1).
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  37. N. Sivin (1965). On "China's Opposition to Western Science During Late Ming and Early Ch'ing". Isis 56 (2):201-205.
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  38. Romeyn Taylor & John W. Dardess (1998). A Ming Society: T'ai-Ho County, Kiangsi, in the Fourteenth to Seventeenth Centuries. Journal of the American Oriental Society 118 (3):433.
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  39. V. A. Uspensky & A. Shen (1995). Li Ming and Vitányi Paul. An Introduction to Kolmogorov Complexity and its Applications. Texts and Monographs in Computer Science. Springer-Verlag, New York, Berlin, Heidelberg, Etc., 1993, Xx + 546 Pp. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 60 (3):1017-1020.
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  40. Zhou Xian (2015). Between Knowledge and Politics: Reflections on Reading Ming Dong Gu’s Sinologism: An Alternative to Orientalism and Postcolonialism. Philosophy East and West 65 (4):1273-1279.
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  41. Jianfeng Zou (2011). Ming Dai Li Xue Xiang Xin Xue de Zhuan Xing: Wu Yubi He Chongren Xue Pai Yan Jiu = the Transition From Zhuli Theory to the Heart-Mind Theory in Ming Dynasty: On Wu Yubi and Chongren School. She Hui Ke Xue Wen Xian Chu Ban She.
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  42.  1
    Yiu Ming Wong (2016). Commentary: Differential Cerebral Response to Somatosensory Stimulation of an Acupuncture Point Vs. Two Non-Acupuncture Points Measured with EEG and fMRI. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
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  43.  74
    Hok-lam Chan (1975). The Rise of Ming T'ai-Tsu (1368-98): Facts and Fictions in Early Ming Official Historiography. Journal of the American Oriental Society 95 (4):679-715.
    It was a common practice of the Chinese official historiographers to employ pseudo-historical, semi-fictional source materials alongside the factual, ascertainable data in their narratives for prescribed political or didactic purposes despite their commitment to the time-honored principles of truth and objectivity in the Confucian-oriented traditional historiography. The intrusion of these non-historical elements in the imperial historical records illustrates, therefore, the adaptability of the source materials representing the popular tradition of the masses for the uses of the great tradition, and the (...)
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  44.  30
    Feng Cao (2008). A Return to Intellectual History: A New Approach to Pre-Qin Discourse on Name. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 3 (2):213-228.
    Discussions of name during the pre-Qin and Qin-Han period of Chinese history were very active. The concept ming at that time can be divided into two categories, one is the ethical-political meaning of the term and the other is the linguistic-logical understanding. The former far exceeds the latter in terms of overall influence on the development of Chinese intellectual history. But it is the latter that has received the most attention in the 20th century, due to the influence of Western (...)
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  45.  2
    Andrew T. W. Hung (2013). Tu Wei-Ming and Charles Taylor on Embodied Moral Reasoning. Philosophy, Culture, and Traditions 3:199-216.
    This paper compares the idea of embodied reasoning by Confucian Tu Wei-Ming and Canadian philosopher Charles Taylor. They have similar concerns about the problems of secular modernity, that is, the domination of instrumental reason and disembodied rationality. Both of them suggest that we have to explore a kind of embodied moral reasoning. I show that their theories of embodiment have many similarities: the body is an instrument for our moral knowledge and self-understanding; such knowledge is inevitably a kind of bodily (...)
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  46.  8
    Youngsun Back (2015). Fate and the Good Life: Zhu Xi and Jeong Yagyong’s Discourse on Ming. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (2):255-274.
    This essay examines the Ru 儒 notion of ming 命, usually translated into English as “fate,” with an emphasis on the thought of two prominent Ru thinkers, Zhu Xi 朱熹 of Song 宋 China and Jeong Yagyong 丁若鏞 of Joseon 朝鮮 Korea. Although they were faithful followers of the tradition of Kongzi 孔子and Mengzi 孟子, they held very different views on ming. Zhu Xi saw the realm of fate as determined by contingent movements of psychophysical force, whereas Jeong Yagyong believed (...)
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  47.  37
    Youguang Li (2010). The True or the Artificial: Theories on Human Nature Before Mencius and Xunzi-Based on “ Sheng is From Ming , and Ming is From Tian ”. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (1):31-50.
    When speaking of pre-Qin Dynasty theories on human nature, past scholars divided Confucius, Mencius and Xunzi into three categories, and they tended to divide the theories into moral categories of good and evil. The discovery of bamboo and silk sheets from this period, however, has offered some valuable literature, providing a historical opportunity for the thorough research of pre-Qin Dynasty theories on human nature. Based on the information on the recently excavated bamboo and silk sheets, especially the essay titled “Xing (...)
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  48.  33
    Franklin Perkins (2009). Motivation and the Heart in the Xing Zi Ming Chu. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (2):117-131.
    In both content and historical position, the “ Xing Zi Ming Chu ” is of obvious significance for understanding the development of classical Chinese philosophy, particularly Confucian moral psychology. This article aims to clarify one aspect of the text, namely, its account of human motivation. This account can be divided into two parts. The first describes human motivation primarily in passive terms of response to external forces, as emotions arise from our nature when stimulated by things in the world. The (...)
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  49.  5
    Joshua M. Hall (2016). Nerve/Nurses of the Cosmic Doctor: Wang Yang-Ming on Self-Awareness as World-Awareness. Asian Philosophy 26 (2):149-165.
    ABSTRACTIn Philip J. Ivanhoe’s introduction to his Readings from the Lu-Wang School of Neo-Confucianism, he argues convincingly that the Ming-era Neo-Confucian philosopher Wang Yang-ming was much more influenced by Buddhism than has generally been recognized. In light of this influence, and the centrality of questions of selfhood in Buddhism, in this article I will explore the theme of selfhood in Wang’s Neo-Confucianism. Put as a mantra, for Wang “self-awareness is world-awareness.” My central image for this mantra is the entire cosmos (...)
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  50.  29
    Ted Slingerland (1996). The Conception of Ming in Early Confucian Thought. Philosophy East and West 46 (4):567-581.
    Various interpretations of the role that ming ("fate") plays in early Confucian thought are examined. An interpretation is advanced which argues that early Confucians saw reality as being bifurcated into two distinct realms--"inner" and "outer"--and that ming refers to unpredictable forces in the outside realm, which are beyond the bounds of proper human endeavor. The vagaries of ming are not the concern of the gentleman, whose efforts and worries are to be focused on the cultivation of the self: the inner (...)
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