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  1. Youru Wang (ed.) (2007). Deconstruction and the Ethical in Asian Thought. Routledge.
    Ethical dimension and deconstruction of normative ethics in Asia traditions -- Similarities and differences between Derridean-Levinasian and Asian ethical thought.
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  2. Jane Augustine, Zong-qi Cai, Simon Glynn, Gad Horowitz, Roger Jackson, E. H. Jarow, Steven W. Laycock, David R. Loy, Ian Mabbett, Frank W. Stevenson, Youru Wang & Ellen Y. Zhang (2006). Buddhisms and Deconstructions. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  3. Youru Wang (2006). Dao Must Flow Freely—The De-Substantialization of Buddha Nature in Huineng Chan. International Journal for Field-Being 5 (1).
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  4. Youru Wang (2005). Buddhism and Deconstruction: Toward a Comparative Semiotics (Review). Philosophy East and West 55 (3):486-489.
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  5. Youru Wang (2004). The Limits of the Critique of “the Zen Critique of Language”: Some Comments onPhilosophical Meditations on Zen Buddhism. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 4 (1):43-55.
  6. Youru Wang (2004). The Strategies of "Goblet Words": Indirect Communication in the Zhuangzi. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (2):195–218.
  7. Youru Wang (2003). Reification and Deconstruction of Buddha Nature in Chinese Chan. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 3 (1):63-84.
  8. Youru Wang (2001). Liberating Oneself From the Absolutized Boundary of Language: A Liminological Approach to the Interplay of Speech and Silence in Chan Buddhism. Philosophy East and West 51 (1):83-99.
    An approach that allows us to see more clearly what Chan Buddhists mean by the inadequacy of language is based on three principles of liminology of language: (1) the radical problematization of any absolute, immobilized limit of language; (2) insight into the mutual connection and transition between two sides of language--speaking and non-speaking; and (3) linguistic twisting as the strategy of play at the limit of language. It helps us to rediscover how Chan masters perceived a dynamic, mutually involving relation (...)
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  9. youru wang (2000). Philosophy of Change and the Deconstruction of Self in the Zhuangzi. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 27 (3):345–360.
  10. Youru Wang (2000). The Pragmatics of 'Never Tell Too Plainly': Indirect Communication in Chan Buddhism. Asian Philosophy 10 (1):7 – 31.
    This is a philosophical investigation of the linguistic strategy of Chinese Chan Buddhism. First, it examines the underlying structure of Chan communication, which determines the Chan pragmatics of 'never tell too plainly'. The examination of the structural features of Chan communication reveals what the Chan 'special transmission' means. The Chan definition of communication is very different from the Aristotelian conception of communication in the West. The Aristotelian hierarchy of speaker over listener, or the direct over indirect, is absent is Chan (...)
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  11. Youru Wang (1997). An Inquiry Into the Liminology of Language in the Zhuangzi and in Chan Buddhism. International Philosophical Quarterly 37 (2):161-178.
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