You are accessing PhilPapers from Open University (UK), an institution that is not subscribed to PhilPapers. Starting on July 1, 2014, we ask institutions that grant philosophy degrees and are based in high-GDP countries to contribute to PhilPapers' maintenance and development through a subscription. See this page for details. Please show your support by contacting your librarian.
86 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
Yujin Nagasawa [85]Yujin Nagasawa [1]
See also:
Profile: Yujin Nagasawa (University of Birmingham)
  1. Yujin Nagasawa, Do Confucians Really Care?
    (accepted for publication before I began my graduate studies at Oxford; Hypatia, 2002).
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Yujin Nagasawa, Doing the Best One Can.
    in Values and Morals, eds. Alvin Goldman and Jaegwon Kim (Reidel, 1978), pp. 186-214.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Yujin Nagasawa (web). Formulating the Explanatory Gap. American Philosophical Association Newsletter on Philosophy and Computers.
    The American Philosophical Association Newsletter on Philosophy and Computers. Harman.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Yujin Nagasawa, Knowledge Argument.
    The knowledge argument is an argument against physicalism that was first formulated by Frank Jackson in 1982. While Jackson no longer endorses it, it is still regarded as one of the most important arguments in the philosophy of mind. Physicalism is the metaphysical thesis that, roughly speaking, everything in this world—including tables, galaxies, cheese cakes, cars, atoms, and even our sensations— are ultimately physical. The knowledge argument attempts to undermine this thesis by appealing to the following simple imaginary scenario: Mary (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Yujin Nagasawa, Realism and Ontology.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Yujin Nagasawa, Rawls and Utilitarianism.
    in John Rawls’ Theory of Social Justice, eds. Gene Blocker and Elizabeth Smith (Ohio University Press, 1980), pp.346-394.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Yujin Nagasawa, Seeing Movements.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Yujin Nagasawa, Surgeon Report Cards and the Concept of Defensive Medicine.
    The performance records of cardiac surgeons have been disclosed publicly in several states in the USA, for example New York and Pennsylvania, since the early 1990s. In response to the growing interest in the quality of healthcare, such records have also begun to be disclosed in the UK, starting in 2004. Various studies seem to show that disclosure has, indeed, contributed to the improvement of the quality of healthcare.1 However, at the same time, disclosure does have its critics.2 In this (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Yujin Nagasawa, Two Concepts of Democracy.
    in Ethical Issues in Government, ed. Norman Bowie (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1981), pp. 68-82.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Yujin Nagasawa, John Hick's Pan(En)Theistic Monism.
    John Hick is a mind-body dualist. He claims that reality consists of two ontologically distinct types of entities, the mental and the physical, which causally interact with each other. Yet he subscribes to monism in response to the diversity of religion. He maintains that every world religion provides a unique response to the same single transcategorial ultimate reality. He also contends that he has realised through his religious experience that, as monism says, everything is part of a single indivisible whole. (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Yujin Nagasawa, Note on Mark Rowlands' Externalism: Putting Mind and World Back Together Again.
    In his new book, Rowlands defines externalism roughly as the thesis that ‘not all mental things are exclusively located inside the head of the person or creature that has these things’ (2). The book has two distinctive features. One is that while philosophers’ discussions of externalism tend to be very technical, Rowlands presents his own discussion in an accessible manner. The second, more distinctive than the first, is that Rowlands treats the concept of externalism as a topic in both analytic (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Yujin Nagasawa, Note on Robert Kirk's Mind and Body.
    This is a concise guidebook to the mind-body problem in Acumen’s Series of Central Problems of Philosophy. Kirk’s writing style is clear and systematic and the book is to be recommended to anyone interested in the mind-body problem.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Yujin Nagasawa, Perry and Mary: Review of John Perry's Knowledge, Possibility, and Consciousness. [REVIEW]
    John Perry’s Knowledge, Possibility, and Consciousness is based on the Jean Nicod Lectures, which he gave in Paris in 1999. The main goal of this book is to defend what he calls ‘antecedent physicalism’ from various common objections to physicalism. I do not agree with Perry’s approach to the problem of phenomenal consciousness; in particular, I disagree with his approach to the knowledge argument. Nevertheless, I found his book extremely helpful in understanding complex issues in the recent debate on the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Yujin Nagasawa, Review of Joseph Levine's Purple Haze: The Puzzle of Consciousness. [REVIEW]
    The aim of this book is to defend ‘explanatory gap’, Levine’s own influential notion in the philosophical studies of phenomenal consciousness. The entire book proves how clear and systematic are Levine’s arguments in dealing with even as highly intractable an issue as the mystery of consciousness. The mind-body problem in a contemporary guise is rooted in two prima facie plausible but incompatible propositions that philosophers have reached: (1) Some form of materialism or physicalism is true. (2) Phenomenal consciousness, raw feel, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Yujin Nagasawa, Review of Michael Palmer's the Question of God. [REVIEW]
    Michael Palmer’s The Question of God is an introductory textbook of the philosophy of religion. Textbooks on this subject typically cover a wide range of issues such as divine attributes, religious experiences, the problem of evil, life after death, and so on. Palmer’s book, however, solely focuses on a single problem: the existence of God. The book discusses six classic arguments for the existence of God: the ontological argument, the cosmological argument, the argument from design, the argument from miracles, the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Yujin Nagasawa, The MaximalGod and the Problem of Evil.
    I have argued elsewhere that nearly all existing arguments against Anselmian theism—such as the paradox of the stone, the argument from God’s inability to sin, and the problem of evil—can be refuted all at once by holding that God possesses the maximal consistent set of knowledge, power and benevolence instead of insisting that He is omniscient, omnipotent and omnibenevolent. Some critics suggest, however, that my strategy fails, at least with respect to the problem of evil, because that problem defeats not (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Yujin Nagasawa, Australian Dualisms.
    It is widely recognised that Australia has produced a number of prominent physicalists, such as D. M. Armstrong, U. T. Place and J. J. C. Smart. It is sometimes forgotten, however, that Australia has also produced a number of prominent dualists. This entry introduces the views of three Australian dualists: Keith Campbell, Frank Jackson and David Chalmers. Their positions differ uniquely from those of traditional dualists because their endorsement of dualism is based on their sympathy with a naturalistic, materialistic worldview (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Benjamin Matheson & Yujin Nagasawa (eds.) (forthcoming). The Palgrave Handbook on the Afterlife. Palgrave Macmillan.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Torin Nagasawa, Yujin, Alter (ed.) (forthcoming). Consciousness and the Physical World. Oxford University Press.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Yujin Nagasawa (2013). Models of Anselmian Theism. Faith and Philosophy 30 (1):3-25.
    The so-called Anselmian thesis says that God is that than which no greater can be thought. This thesis has been widely accepted among traditional theists and it has for several hundred years been a central notion whenever philosophers debate the existence and nature of God. Proponents of the thesis are often silent, however, about exactly what it means to say that God is that than which no greater can be thought. The aim of this paper is to offer an answer (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Torin Alter & Yujin Nagasawa (2012). What is Russellian Monism? Journal of Consciousness Studies 19 (9-10):9-10.
    Russellian monism offers a distinctive perspective on the relationship between the physical and the phenomenal. For example, on one version of the view, phenomenal properties are the categorical bases of fundamental physical properties, such as mass and charge, which are dispositional. Russellian monism has prominent supporters, such as Bertrand Russell, Grover Maxwell, Michael Lockwood, and David Chalmers. But its strengths and shortcomings are often misunderstood. In this paper we try to eliminate confusions about the view and defend it from criticisms. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. David Cheetham & Yujin Nagasawa (2012). In Memoriam: John Hick. The Philosophers' Magazine 57:10-11.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Yujin Nagasawa (2012). Infinite Decomposability and the Mind-Body Problem. American Philosophical Quarterly 49 (4):357-367.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Yujin Nagasawa (ed.) (2012). Scientific Approaches to the Philosophy of Religion. Palgrave Macmillan.
    The book's contributors tackle perennial problems in philosophy of religion by referring to relevant findings and theories in cognitive science, anthropology, developmental psychology, decision theory, biology, physics and cosmology.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Yujin Nagasawa & Nick Trakakis (2012). Skeptical Theism and Moral Skepticism: A Reply to Almeida and Oppy. Ars Disputandi: The Online Journal for Philosophy of Religion 4 (4):1-1.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Max Velmans, Yujin Nagasawa, In M. Velmans & Y. Nagasawa (2012). Introduction to Monist Alternatives to Physicalism. Journal of Consciousness Studies 19 (9):7.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Yujin Nagasawa (2011). Anselmian Theism. Philosophy Compass 6 (8):564-571.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Yujin Nagasawa (2011). Preface. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 69 (2):71-71.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Yujin Nagasawa (2011). The Existence of God: A Philosophical Introduction. Routledge.
    Does God exist? What are the various arguments that seek to prove the existence of God? Can atheists refute these arguments? The Existence of God: A Philosophical Introduction assesses classical and contemporary arguments concerning the existence of God: the ontological argument, introducing the nature of existence, possible worlds, parody objections, and the evolutionary origin of the concept of God the cosmological argument, discussing metaphysical paradoxes of infinity, scientific models of the universe, and philosophers’ discussions about ultimate reality and the meaning (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Yujin Nagasawa (2010). The Knowledge Argument and Epiphenomenalism. Erkenntnis 72 (1):37 - 56.
    Frank Jackson endorses epiphenomenalism because he thinks that his knowledge argument undermines physicalism. One of the most interesting criticisms of Jackson's position is what I call the 'inconsistency objection'. The inconsistency objection says that Jackson's position is untenable because epiphenomenalism undermines the knowledge argument. The inconsistency objection has been defended by various philosophers independently, including Michael Watkins, Fredrik Stjernberg, and Neil Campbell. Surprisingly enough, while Jackson himself admits explicitly that the inconsistency objection is 'the most powerful reply to the knowledge (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Yujin Nagasawa (2010). The Ontological Argument and the Devil. Philosophical Quarterly 60 (238):72-91.
    The 'parody objection' to the ontological argument for the existence of God advances parallel arguments apparently proving the existence of various absurd entities. I discuss recent versions of the parody objection concerning the existence of 'AntiGod' and the devil, as introduced by Peter Millican and Timothy Chambers. I argue that the parody objection always fails, because any parody is either (i) not structurally parallel to the ontological argument, or (ii) not dialectically parallel to the ontological argument. Moreover, once a parody (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Lisa Bortolotti & Yujin Nagasawa (2009). Immortality Without Boredom. Ratio 22 (3):261-277.
    In this paper we address Bernard Williams' argument for the undesirability of immortality. Williams argues that unavoidable and pervasive boredom would characterise the immortal life of an individual with unchanging categorical desires. We resist this conclusion on the basis of the distinction between habitual and situational boredom and a psychologically realistic account of significant factors in the formation of boredom. We conclude that Williams has offered no persuasive argument for the necessity of boredom in the immortal life. 1.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Yujin Nagasawa (2009). The Knowledge Argument. In Bayne Tim, Cleeremans Axel & Wilken Patrick (eds.), The Oxford Companion to Consciousness. Oxford University Press. 395--397.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Yujin Nagasawa & Erik J. Wielenberg (2009). Introduction. In Yujin Nagasawa & Erik J. Wielenberg (eds.), New Waves in Philosophy of Religion. Palgrave Macmillan.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Yujin Nagasawa & Erik J. Wielenberg (eds.) (2009). New Waves in Philosophy of Religion. Palgrave Macmillan.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Yujin Nagasawa (2008). A New Defence of Anselmian Theism. Philosophical Quarterly 58 (233):577-596.
    Anselmian theists, for whom God is the being than which no greater can be thought, usually infer that he is an omniscient, omnipotent and omnibenevolent being. Critics have attacked these claims by numerous distinct arguments, such as the paradox of the stone, the argument from God's inability to sin, and the argument from evil. Anselmian theists have responded to these arguments by constructing an independent response to each. This way of defending Anselmian theism is uneconomical. I seek to establish a (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Yujin Nagasawa (2008). God and Phenomenal Consciousness: A Novel Approach to Knowledge Arguments. Cambridge University Press.
    In God and Phenomenal Consciousness, Yujin Nagasawa bridges debates in two distinct areas of philosophy: the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of religion. First, he introduces some of the most powerful arguments against the existence of God and provides new objections to them. He then presents a hitherto unrecognised parallel structure between these arguments and influential arguments offered by Thomas Nagel and Frank Jackson against the physicalist approach to phenomenal consciousness. By appealing to this structure, Nagasawa constructs novel objections (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Yujin Nagasawa (2008). Proxy Consent and Counterfactuals. Bioethics 22 (1):16–24.
    When patients are in vegetative states and their lives are maintained by medical devices, their surrogates might offer proxy consents on their behalf in order to terminate the use of the devices. The so-called ’substituted judgment thesis’ has been adopted by the courts regularly in order to determine the validity of such proxy consents. The thesis purports to evaluate proxy consents by appealing to putative counterfactual truths about what the patients would choose, were they to be competent. The aim of (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Yujin Nagasawa (2008). Zombies and Consciousness - by Robert Kirk. Philosophical Books 49 (2):170-171.
  40. Yujin Nagasawa (2008). Review of Kirk's Zombies and Consciousness. [REVIEW] Philosophical Books 49:170-171.
    We imagine Zombies as beings identical to us with respect to all physical and behavioural facts but different with respect to phenomenal facts. For example, zombies might say, just like us, ‘this grapefruit is really sour’ or ‘my left knee hurts’, but, unlike us, they have no phenomenal experiences corresponding to these utterances or to the relevant physical states. The idea of zombies has been used to construct the following argument against the physicalist approach to consciousness.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Tim Bayne & Yujin Nagasawa (2007). The Grounds of Worship Again: A Reply to Crowe. Religious Studies 43 (4):475-480.
    Although one would not have guessed it from the amount of attention that the topic has received from recent philosophers of religion, the God of theism is first and foremost a being that is worthy of worship. In the paper that forms the target of Crowe’s discussion we attempted to shed some much-needed light on worship. Our focus was not on the question of whether theists hold that human beings are obliged to..
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Yujin Nagasawa (2007). A Further Reply to Beyer on Omniscience. Sophia 46 (1):65-67.
    I provide a further response to Jason A. Beyer’s objections to the alleged inconsistency between God’s omniscience and His other attributes.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Yujin Nagasawa (2007). Surgeon Report Cards and the Concept of Defensive Medicine. In Yujin Nagasawa & Steve Clarke Justin Oakley (eds.), Informed Consent and Clinical Accountability: The Ethics of Auditing and Reporting Surgeon Performance. Cambridge University Press.
    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the claim that the disclosure of surgeons' performance data could lead to the practice of defensive medicine. I argue that disclosure could actually encourage surgeons to practice a new form of defensive medicine, one that has not hitherto been noted. I explore a possible way of avoiding this problem.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Yujin Nagasawa (2007). Millican on the Ontological Argument. Mind 116 (464):1027-1040.
    Peter Millican (2004) provides a novel and elaborate objection to Anselm's ontological argument. Millican thinks that his objection is more powerful than any other because it does not dispute contentious 'deep philosophical theories' that underlie the argument. Instead, it tries to reveal the 'fatal flaw' of the argument by considering its 'shallow logical details'. Millican's objection is based on his interpretation of the argument, according to which Anselm relies on what I call the 'principle of the superiority of existence' (PSE). (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Yujin Nagasawa (2007). The Grounds of Worship Again: A Reply to Crowe. Religious Studies 43 (4).
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Yujin Nagasawa & Tim Bayne (2007). The Grounds of Worship Again: A Reply to Crowe. Religious Studies 43 (4):475-480.
    In this paper we respond to Benjamin Crowe's criticisms in this issue of our discussion of the grounds of worship. We clarify our previous position, and examine Crowe's account of what it is about God's nature that might ground our obligation to worship Him. We find Crowe's proposals no more persuasive than the accounts that we examined in our previous paper, and conclude that theists still owe us an account of what it is in virtue of which we have obligations (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Yujin Nagasawa & Steve Clarke Justin Oakley (eds.) (2007). Informed Consent and Clinical Accountability: The Ethics of Auditing and Reporting Surgeon Performance. Cambridge University Press.
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Tim Bayne & Yujin Nagasawa (2006). The Grounds of Worship. Religious Studies 42 (3):299-313.
    Although worship has a pivotal place in religious thought and practice, philosophers of religion have had remarkably little to say about it. In this paper we examine some of the many questions surrounding the notion of worship, focusing on the claim that human beings have obligations to worship God. We explore a number of attempts to ground our supposed duty to worship God, and argue that each is problematic. We conclude by examining the implications of this result, and suggest that (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Co-Written, Yujin Nagasawa & Nick Trakakis (2006). The Problem of Heaven. In Graham Robert Oppy (ed.), Arguing About Gods. Cambridge University Press.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Yujin Nagasawa (2006). A Place for Protoconsciousness? Psyche 12 (5).
    I argue that Gregg Rosenberg’s panexperientialism is either extremely implausible or irrelevant to the mystery of consciousness by introducing metaphysical and conceptual objections to his appeal to the notion of ‘protoconsciousness’.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 86