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  1. Yuval Dolev (2014). Reading PutnamBy Maria Baghramian. Analysis 74 (2):351-353.
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  2. Yuval Dolev (2011). The Tenseless Theory of Time. Review of Metaphysics 54 (2):259-288.
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  3. Yuval Dolev (2010). Antirealism, Presentism and Bivalence. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 18 (1):73 – 89.
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  4. Yuval Dolev (2008). Introducing Philosophy of Mathematics - by Michèle Friend. Philosophical Books 49 (2):190-191.
  5. Yuval Dolev (2008). Semantic Externalism and Presentism. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 16 (4):533 – 557.
    In this paper I discuss an unconventional form of presentism which, I claim, captures better than all other versions of the doctrine the fundamental notion underpinning it, namely, the notion that 'only what is present is real'. My proposal is to take this maxim as stating, not the rather uncontroversial view that past things are not real now, but the more radical idea that they never were. This rendition of presentism is, I argue, the only one that is neither trivial (...)
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  6. Yuval Dolev (2007). Mission Impossible and Wittgenstein's Standard Metre. Philosophical Investigations 30 (2):127–137.
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  7. Yuval Dolev (2007). Time and Realism: Metaphysical and Antimetaphysical Perspectives. The Mit Press.
    Dolev's ambitious project is to show that the traditional debate in the philosophy of time between the so-called ‘tensed’ and ‘tenseless’ theorists is not a sustainable one. The key to the negative portion argument is that both the tensed and tenseless view of time can be understood only from within their respective ontological frameworks. Moreover, that there is only really an appearance of understanding within these frameworks, since neither framework furnishes us with the wherewithal to genuinely understand temporal language. Moving (...)
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  8. Yuval Dolev (2004). Why Induction is No Cure for Baldness. Philosophical Investigations 27 (4):328–344.
  9. Yuval Dolev (2000). Dummett's Antirealism and Time. European Journal of Philosophy 8 (3):253–276.
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  10. Yuval Dolev (2000). The Tenseless Theory of Time: Insights and Limitations. Review of Metaphysics 54 (2):259 - 288.
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  11. Yuval Dolev (1997). Time From the Metaphysical and Anti-Metaphysical Viewpoints. Dissertation, Harvard University
    The idea that the present is "ontologically privileged" can be traced back to texts as early as St. Augustine's Confessions and Aristotle's Physics. The issue of the ontological status of tense continues to set the agenda in contemporary philosophy of time, which is dominated by two views. Proponents of the Tenseless View argue that all events are, in the timeless sense of 'are', equally real. Defenders of the rival Tensed View maintain that only present events are real, and that the (...)
     
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