Search results for 'Zack Jenkins' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  19
    Zack Jenkins (2003). Do You Need to Believe in Orbitals to Use Them?: Realism and the Autonomy of Chemistry. Philosophy of Science 70 (5):1052-1062.
    Eric Scerri and other authors have acknowledged that the reality of chemical orbitals is not compatible with quantum mechanics. Recently, however, Scerri and Sharon Crasnow have argued that if chemists cannot consider orbitals as real entities, then chemistry is in danger of being reduced to physics. I argue that the question of the existence of orbitals is best viewed as an issue of approximation, not metaphysics: in many chemically important cases orbitals do not make sufficiently accurate predictions, and must be (...)
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  2.  24
    Zack Jenkins (2003). Do You Need to Believe in Orbitals to Use Them?: Realism and the Autonomy of Chemistry. Philosophy of Science 70 (5):1052-1062.
    Eric Scerri and other authors have acknowledged that the reality of chemical orbitals is not compatible with quantum mechanics. Recently, however, Scerri and Sharon Crasnow have argued that if chemists cannot consider orbitals as real entities, then chemistry is in danger of being reduced to physics. I argue that the question of the existence of orbitals is best viewed as an issue of explanation, not metaphysics: In many chemically important cases orbitals do not make sufficiently accurate predictions, and must be (...)
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  3.  7
    Jacqueline Jenkins (1995). cThis Lyf En Englyssh Tunge': Translation Anxiety in Late Medieval Lives of St Katherine Jacqueline Jenkins. Speculum 70:822-64.
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  4.  47
    Masashi Kasaki & C. Jenkins (2015). The Traditional Conception of the a Priori. Synthese 192 (9):2725-2746.
    In this paper, we explore the traditional conception of a prioricity as epistemic independence of evidence from sense experience. We investigate the fortunes of the traditional conception in the light of recent challenges by Timothy Williamson. We contend that Williamson’s arguments can be resisted in various ways. En route, we argue that Williamson’s views are not as distant from tradition as they might seem at first glance.
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  5.  24
    C. S. Jenkins (2008). Grounding Concepts: An Empirical Basis for Arithmetical Knowledge. OUP Oxford.
    Carrie Jenkins presents a new account of arithmetical knowledge, which manages to respect three key intuitions: a priorism, mind-independence realism, and empiricism. Jenkins argues that arithmetic can be known through the examination of empirically grounded concepts, non-accidentally accurate representations of the mind-independent world.
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  6.  50
    Naomi Zack (2002). Philosophy of Science and Race. Routledge.
    In this concisely argued, short new book, well-known philosopher Naomi Zack explores the scientific and philosophical problems in applying a biological conception of race to human beings. Through the systematic analysis of up-to-date data and conclusions in population genetics, transmission genetics, and biological anthropology, Zack provides a comprehensive conceptual account of how "race" in the ordinary sense has no basis in science. Her book combats our everyday understanding of race as a scientifically supported taxonomy of human beings, and (...)
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  7.  1
    Naomi Zack (1994). Race and Mixed Race. Temple University Press.
    Author note: Naomi Zack is Assistant Professor in the Department of Philosophy at the State University of New York at Albany. She herself is of mixed race: Jewish, African American, and Native American.
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  8.  38
    John I. Jenkins (1997). Knowledge and Faith in Thomas Aquinas. Cambridge University Press.
    This book offers a revisionary account of key epistemological concepts and doctrines of St Thomas Aquinas, particularly his concept of scientia (science), and proposes a new interpretation of the purpose and composition of Aquinas's most mature and influential work, the Summa theologiae, which presents the scientia of sacred doctrine, i.e. Christian theology. Contrary to the standard interpretation of it as a work for neophytes in theology, Jenkins argues that it is in fact a pedagogical work intended as the culmination (...)
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  9. Naomi Zack (1996). Bachelors of Science: Seventeenth Century Identity, Then and Now. Temple University Press.
    Naomi Zack begins this extraordinary book with the premise that if one is to understand Western conceptions of racialized and gendered identity, one needs to go back to a period when such categories were not salient and examine how notions ...
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  10.  22
    Keith Jenkins (2003). Refiguring History: New Thoughts on an Old Discipline. Routledge.
    In this engaging sequel to Rethinking History , Keith Jenkins argues for a re-figuration of historical study. At the core of his survey lies the realization that objective and disinterested histories as well as historical 'truth' are unachievable. The past and questions about the nature of history remain interminably open to new and disobedient approaches. Jenkins reassesses conventional history in a bold fashion. His committed and radical study presents new ways of 'thinking history', a new methodology and philosophy (...)
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  11.  46
    Naomi Zack (2010). The Fluid Symbol of Mixed Race. Hypatia 25 (4):875 - 890.
    Philosophers have little to lose in making practical proposals. If the proposals are enacted, the power of ideas to change the world is affirmed. If the proposals are rejected, there is new material for theoretical reflection. During the 1990s, I believed that broad public recognition of mixed race, particularly black and white mixed race, would contribute to an undoing of rigid and racist, socially constructed racial categories. I argued for such recognition in my first book, Race and Mixed Race ( (...) 1993), a follow-through anthology, American Mixed Race (Zack 1995), and numerous articles, especially the essay, ''Mixed Black and White Race and Public Policy," which appeared first in Hypatia in 1995. I aho delivered scores of public and academic lectures and presentations on this subject, all of which expressed the following in varied forms and formats: Race is an idea that lacks the biological foundation it is commonly assumed to have. There is need for broad education about this absence of foundation; mixed-race identities should be recognized, especially black-white identities. (shrink)
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  12.  11
    Keith Jenkins (1999). Why History?: Ethics and Postmodernity. Routledge.
    Why History? is a compelling introduction to the issue of history and ethics. Designed to provoke discussion, the book asks whether and why a good knowledge and understanding of the past is desirable. In the context of current postmodern thinking, Keith Jenkins suggests that the goal of "learning lessons from the past" actually means learning lessons from stories written by historians and others. If the past as history has no foundation, can anything ethical be gained from history? Daring and (...)
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  13.  8
    Nico Jenkins (2013). A Continuous Act.. Continent 2 (4):248-250.
    In this issue we include contributions from the individuals presiding at the panel All in a Jurnal's Work: A BABEL Wayzgoose, convened at the second Biennial Meeting of the BABEL Working Group. Sadly, the contributions of Daniel Remein, chief rogue at the Organism for Poetic Research as well as editor at Whiskey & Fox , were not able to appear in this version of the proceedings. From the program : 2ND BIENNUAL MEETING OF THE BABEL WORKING GROUP CONFERENCE “CRUISING IN (...)
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  14.  8
    Adelbert H. Jenkins (1997). Free Will and Psychotherapy: The Enhancement of Agency. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 17 (1):1-12.
    Proposes that to the extent that psychotherapy allows the individual to exercise greater freedom in his or her life it does so through enhancing psychological agency. The conceptions of free will and of agency used here are influenced strongly by J. F. Rychlak's discussion of the human capacity for "dialectical" thinking. The author discusses these conceptions of agency in terms of some of R. Schafer's recent ideas regarding psychoanalytic psychotherapy. A. H. Jenkins further notes that this conception of individuality (...)
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  15. Mark P. Jenkins (2006). Bernard Williams. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    From his earliest work - on personal identity - to his last - on the value of truthfulness - Bernard Williams' ideas and arguments have been sometimes controversial, often influential, and always worth studying. Mark Jenkins provides a comprehensive account of Williams' many significant contributions to contemporary philosophy and his relation to the work of other philosophers, including prominent forerunners such as Hume and Nietzsche and contemporary thinkers such as, Nagel, McDowell, MacIntyre, and Taylor. Topics considered include personal identity, (...)
     
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  16. Mark P. Jenkins (2006). Bernard Williams. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    From his earliest work - on personal identity - to his last - on the value of truthfulness - Bernard Williams' ideas and arguments have been sometimes controversial, often influential, and always worth studying. Mark Jenkins provides a comprehensive account of Williams' many significant contributions to contemporary philosophy and his relation to the work of other philosophers, including prominent forerunners such as Hume and Nietzsche and contemporary thinkers such as, Nagel, McDowell, MacIntyre, and Taylor. Topics considered include personal identity, (...)
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  17. Barbara Jenkins (2016). Eros and Economy: Jung, Deleuze, Sexual Difference. Routledge.
    _Eros and Economy: Jung, Deleuze, Sexual Difference_ explores the possibility that social relations between things, partially inscribed in their aesthetics, offer important insights into collective political-economic relations of domination and desire. Drawing on the analytical psychology of Carl Jung and the philosophy of Gilles Deleuze, this book focuses on the idea that desire or libido, overlaid by sexual difference, is a driving force behind the material manifestations of cultural production in practices as diverse as art or economy. Re-reading the history (...)
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  18. John I. Jenkins (2007). Knowledge and Faith in Thomas Aquinas. Cambridge University Press.
    This book offers a revisionary account of key epistemological concepts and doctrines of St Thomas Aquinas, particularly his concept of scientia, and proposes an interpretation of the purpose and composition of Aquinas's most mature and influential work, the Summa theologiae, which presents the scientia of sacred doctrine, i.e. Christian theology. Contrary to the standard interpretation of it as a work for neophytes in theology, Jenkins argues that it is in fact a pedagogical work intended as the culmination of philosophical (...)
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  19. Ken Knisely, Naomi Zack & Hugh Taft-Morales (2002). Race and Racism: Dvd. Milk Bottle Productions.
    Is racism an act of the will? A disease? A bad habit? A result of lost virtues or of historical economic forces? Can we reliably claim that racism is an affront to justice? How does our scientific understanding of "race" affect our ethical considerations? How can we ever know if we are acting from racist assumptions? With Leonard Harris, Naomi Zack, and Hugh Taft-Morales.
     
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  20. Ken Knisely, Leonard Harris, Naomi Zack & Hugh Taft-Morales (forthcoming). Race and Racism: No Dogs or Philosophers Allowed. DVD.
    Is racism an act of the will? A disease? A bad habit? A result of lost virtues or of historical economic forces? Can we reliably claim that racism is an affront to justice? How does our scientific understanding of "race" affect our ethical considerations ? How can we ever know if we are acting from racist assumptions? With Leonard Harris, Naomi Zack, and Hugh Taft-Morales.
     
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  21. Naomi Zack (2016). Applicative Justice: A Pragmatic Empirical Approach to Racial Injustice. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Naomi Zack pioneers a new theory of justice starting from a correction of current injustices. While the present justice paradigm in political philosophy and related fields begins from John Rawls’s 1970 Theory of Justice, Zack insists that what people in reality care about is not justice as an ideal, but injustice as a correctable ill. Zack's theory of applicative justice offers a revolutionary reorientation of society's pursuit of justice, seeking to undo injustice in a practical and fully (...)
     
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  22. Naomi Zack (2009). Ethics for Disaster. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Ethics for Disaster addresses the moral aspects of the aftermath of natural disasters such as hurricanes, earthquakes, and tornadoes. The book explores how these catastrophes illuminate the existing inequalities in society, combining a unique philosophical approach with new moral thinking. Zack stresses the obligation of both individuals and government in preparing for and responding to dangerous times, forcefully arguing for the preservation of normal moral principles even in times of crisis and national emergency.
     
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  23. Naomi Zack (2010). Ethics for Disaster. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Ethics for Disaster addresses the moral aspects of the aftermath of natural disasters such as hurricanes, earthquakes, and tornadoes. The book explores how these catastrophes illuminate the existing inequalities in society, combining a unique philosophical approach with new moral thinking. Zack stresses the obligation of both individuals and government in preparing for and responding to dangerous times, forcefully arguing for the preservation of normal moral principles even in times of crisis and national emergency.
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  24. Naomi Zack (2011). The Ethics and Mores of Race: Equality After the History of Philosophy. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Naomi Zack brings us an indispensable work in the ethics of race through an inquiry into the history of moral philosophy. The Ethics and Mores of Race: Equality after the History of Philosophy enters into a web of ideas, ethics, and morals that untangle our evolving ideas of racial equality straight into the twenty-first century.
     
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  25. Naomi Zack (2015). The Ethics and Mores of Race: Equality After the History of Philosophy, with a New Preface. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Naomi Zack brings us an indispensable work in the ethics of race through an inquiry into the history of moral philosophy. The Ethics and Mores of Race: Equality after the History of Philosophy enters into a web of ideas, ethics, and morals that untangle our evolving ideas of racial equality straight into the twenty-first century. In the preface to the paperback edition, Zack addresses the criticisms raised in response to this book and concludes that a focus on rights (...)
     
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  26. Naomi Zack (2015). White Privilege and Black Rights: The Injustice of U.S. Police Racial Profiling and Homicide. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Examining racial profiling in American policing, Naomi Zack argues against white privilege discourse while introducing a new theory of applicative justice. Deepening understanding without abandoning hope, Zack shows why it is more important to consider black rights than white privilege as we move forward through today's culture of inequality.
     
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  27. Naomi Zack (2015). White Privilege and Black Rights: The Injustice of U.S. Police Racial Profiling and Homicide. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Examining racial profiling in American policing, Naomi Zack argues against white privilege discourse while introducing a new theory of applicative justice. Deepening understanding without abandoning hope, Zack shows why it is more important to consider black rights than white privilege as we move forward through today's culture of inequality.
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  28. Heledd Jenkins (2006). Small Business Champions for Corporate Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 67 (3):241 - 256.
    While Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has traditionally been the domain of the corporate sector, recognition of the growing significance of the Small and Medium Sized Enterprise (SME) sector has led to an emphasis on their social and environmental impact, illustrated by an increasing number of initiatives aimed at engaging SMEs in the CSR agenda. CSR has been well researched in large companies, but SMEs have received less attention in this area. This paper presents the findings from a U.K. wide study (...)
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  29. C. S. Jenkins (2011). Is Metaphysical Dependence Irreflexive? The Monist 94 (2):267-276.
  30.  79
    Katharine Jenkins (2015). Amelioration and Inclusion: Gender Identity and the Concept of Woman. Ethics 126 (2):394-421.
    Feminist analyses of gender concepts must avoid the inclusion problem, the fault of marginalizing or excluding some prima facie women. Sally Haslanger’s ‘ameliorative’ analysis of gender concepts seeks to do so by defining woman by reference to subordination. I argue that Haslanger’s analysis problematically marginalizes trans women, thereby failing to avoid the inclusion problem. I propose an improved ameliorative analysis that ensures the inclusion of trans women. This analysis yields ‘twin’ target concepts of woman, one concerning gender as class and (...)
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  31. C. S. I. Jenkins (2014). Serious Verbal Disputes: Ontology, Metaontology, and Analyticity. Journal of Philosophy 111 (9/10):454-469.
    This paper builds on some important recent work by Amie Thomasson, wherein she argues that recent disputes about the existence of ordinary objects have arisen due to eliminiativist metaphysicians’ misunderstandings. Some, she argues, are mistaken about how the language of quantification works, while others neglect the existence and significance of certain analytic entailments. Thomasson claims that once these misunderstandings are cleared away, it is trivially easy to answer existence questions about ordinary objects using everyday empirical methods of investigation. She reveals (...)
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  32.  2
    H. M. Jenkins & Donald Shattuck (1981). Contingency in Fear Conditioning: A Reexamination. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 17 (3):159-162.
  33. Katrina Hutchison & Fiona Jenkins (eds.) (2013). Women in Philosophy: What Needs to Change? OUP USA.
    Why are professional philosophers today still overwhelmingly male? Often it is assumed that women need to change to fit existing institutions. This book instead offers concrete reflections on the way in which philosophy needs to change to benefit from the important contribution women's full participation makes to the discipline.
     
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  34. Richard Jenkins (2002). Imagined but Not Imaginary: Ethnicity and Nationalism in the Modern World. In Jeremy MacClancy (ed.), Exotic No More: Anthropology on the Front Lines. University of Chicago Press 114--128.
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  35. C. S. Jenkins & Daniel Nolan (2012). Disposition Impossible. Noûs 46 (4):732-753.
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  36. T. Jenkins (2002). An Ethical Account of Ritual: An Anthropological Description of the Anglican Daily Offices. Studies in Christian Ethics 15 (1):1-10.
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  37.  84
    Heledd Jenkins (2009). A 'Business Opportunity' Model of Corporate Social Responsibility for Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprises. Business Ethics 18 (1):21-36.
    In their book 'Corporate Social Opportunity', Grayson and Hodges maintain that 'the driver for business success is entrepreneurialism, a competitive instinct and a willingness to look for innovation from non-traditional areas such as those increasingly found within the corporate social responsibility (CSR) agenda'. Such opportunities are described as 'commercially viable activities which also advance environmental and social sustainability'. There are three dimensions to corporate social opportunity (CSO) – innovation in products and services, serving unserved markets and building new business models. (...)
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  38.  15
    Gary Lynch-Wood, David Williamson & Wyn Jenkins (2009). The Over-Reliance on Self-Regulation in CSR Policy. Business Ethics: A European Review 18 (1):52-65.
    The view that CSR performance can be improved most effectively through external pressures is shown to be invalid for most firms. In exploring why this is the case, the authors demonstrate that most small and medium enterprises are not exposed to the same pressures as large firms, and that this undermines many of the assumptions that underpin the externally driven business case (EDBC) for voluntary CSR practices. The analysis does this by looking at the external drivers of one of the (...)
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  39. C. S. Jenkins (2007). Entitlement and Rationality. Synthese 157 (1):25 - 45.
    This paper takes the form of a critical discussion of Crispin Wright’s notion of entitlement of cognitive project. I examine various strategies for defending the claim that entitlement can make acceptance of a proposition epistemically rational, including one which appeals to epistemic consequentialism. Ultimately, I argue, none of these strategies is successful, but the attempt to isolate points of disagreement with Wright issues in some positive proposals as to how an epistemic consequentialist should characterize epistemic rationality.
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  40. C. S. Jenkins (2005). Realism and Independence. American Philosophical Quarterly 42 (3):199 - 209.
    I argue that mind-independence realism should be characterised in terms of what I call 'essential', rather than 'modal', independence from our mental lives. I explore the connections between the two kinds of independence, and argue that characterizations in terms of essence respect more intuitions about what realism is, harmonize better with standard characterizations of anti-realism, and avert the threat of subversion from Blackburn's quasi-realist.
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  41. Fiona Jenkins (2013). A Sensate Critique: Vulnerability and the Image in Judith Butler's Frames of War. Substance 42 (3):105-126.
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  42.  6
    Laura E. Schulz, Noah D. Goodman, Joshua B. Tenenbaum & Adrianna C. Jenkins (2008). Going Beyond the Evidence: Abstract Laws and Preschoolers’ Responses to Anomalous Data. Cognition 109 (2):211-223.
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  43.  99
    C. S. I. Jenkins (2014). Merely Verbal Disputes. Erkenntnis 79 (1):11-30.
    Philosophers readily talk about merely verbal disputes, usually without much or any explicit reflection on what these are, and a good deal of methodological significance is attached to discovering whether a dispute is merely verbal or not. Currently, metaphilosophical advances are being made towards a clearer understanding of what exactly it takes for something to be a merely verbal dispute. This paper engages with this growing literature, pointing out some problems with existing approaches, and develops a new proposal which builds (...)
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  44. C. S. Jenkins (2008). Modal Knowledge, Counterfactual Knowledge and the Role of Experience. Philosophical Quarterly 58 (233):693-701.
    In recent work Timothy Williamson argues that the epistemology of metaphysical modality is a special case of the epistemology of counterfactuals. I argue that Williamson has not provided an adequate argument for this controversial claim, and that it is not obvious how what he says should be supplemented in order to derive such an argument. But I suggest that an important moral of his discussion survives this point. The moral is that experience could play an epistemic role which is more (...)
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  45. Naomi Zack (2009). The Ethics of Disaster Planning. Philosophy of Management 8 (2):55-66.
    We are morally obligated to plan for disaster because it affects human life and well-being. Because contemporary disasters affect the public, such planning should be public in democracies and it should not violate the basic ethical principles of normal times. Current Avian Flu pandemic planning is restricted to a response model based on scarce resources, or inadequate preparation, which gives priority to some lives over others. Rather than this model of ‘Save the Greatest Number,’ the public would be more ethically (...)
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  46. Heledd Jenkins (2006). Small Business Champions for Corporate Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 67 (3):241-256.
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  47.  36
    Thomas S. Hyde & James J. Jenkins (1969). Differential Effects of Incidental Tasks on the Organization of Recall of a List of Highly Associated Words. Journal of Experimental Psychology 82 (3):472.
  48.  10
    B. P. Bradley, K. Mogg, N. Millar, C. Bonham-Carter, E. Fergusson, J. Jenkins & M. Parr (1997). Attentional Biases for Emotional Faces. Cognition and Emotion 11 (1):25-42.
  49.  41
    C. S. I. Jenkins (2015). Modal Monogamy. Ergo, an Open Access Journal of Philosophy 2.
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  50.  2
    Rob Jenkins, David White, Xandra Van Montfort & A. Mike Burton (2011). Variability in Photos of the Same Face. Cognition 121 (3):313-323.
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