Search results for 'Zen Buddhism Psychology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Erich Fromm (1960/1986). Psychoanalysis and Zen Buddhism. Unwin Paperbacks.score: 390.0
  2. Jerry Grenard (2008). The Phenomenology of Koan Meditation in Zen Buddhism. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 39 (2):151-188.score: 246.0
    Zen students described their experiences when working with koans, and a phenomenological method was used to identify the structure of those experiences. Zen koans are statements or stories developed in China and Japan by Zen masters in order to help students transform their conscious awareness of the world. Eight participants including 3 females and 5 males from Southern California with 1 to 30 years of experience in Zen answered open-ended questions about koan practice in one tape-recorded session for each participant. (...)
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  3. Hubert Benoît (2004). The Light of Zen in the West: Incorporating the Supreme Doctrine and the Realization of the Self. Sussex Academic Press.score: 225.0
    Following the success of the publication of "The Supreme Doctrine" in 1998, Sussex Academic is proud to announce a completely new and updated translation by ...
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  4. Christian Coseru (2008). A Review of Zen Buddhism and Environmental Ethics. [REVIEW] Sophia 47 (1):75-77.score: 224.0
    Simon P. James' Zen Buddhism and Environmental Ethics offers an engaging, sophisticated, and well-argued defence of the notion that Zen Buddhism has something positive to offer the environmental movement. James' goal is two-fold: first, dispel criticism that Zen (by virtue of its anti-philosophical stance) lacks an ethical program (because it shuns conventional morality), has no concern for the environment at large (because it adopts a thoroughly anthropocentric stance), and deprives living entities of any intrinsic worth (because it operates (...)
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  5. Leesa S. Davis (2010). Advaita Vedanta and Zen Buddhism: Deconstructive Modes of Spiritual Inquiry. Continuum.score: 224.0
    Introduction: Experiential deconstructive inquiry -- Foundational philosophies and spiritual methods -- Non-duality in Advaita Vedanta and Zen Buddhism -- Ontological differences and non-duality -- Meditative inquiry, questioning, and dialoguing as a means to spiritual insight -- The undoing or deconstruction of dualistic conceptions -- Advaita Vedanta : philosophical foundations and deconstructive strategies -- Sources of the tradition -- Upaniads that art thou (Tat Tvam Asi) -- Gauapda (c.7th century) : no bondage, no liberation -- Aakara (c.7th-8th century) : there (...)
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  6. Mark T. Unno (1999). Questions in the Making: A Review Essay on Zen Buddhist Ethics in the Context of Buddhist and Comparative Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 27 (3):507 - 536.score: 224.0
    In reviewing four works from the 1990s-monographs by Christopher Ives and Phillip Olson on Zen Buddhist ethics, Damien Keown's treatment of Indian Buddhist ethics, and an edited collection on Buddhism and human rights-this article examines recent scholarship on Zen Buddhist ethics in light of issues in Buddhist and comparative ethics. It highlights selected themes in the notional and real encounter of Zen Buddhism with Western thought and culture as presented in the reviewed works and identifies issues and problems (...)
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  7. Toshihiko Izutsu (1977/1982). Toward a Philosophy of Zen Buddhism. Prajñā Press.score: 224.0
    The true man without any rank.--Two dimensions of ego consciousness.--Sense and nonsense in Zen Buddhism.--The philosophical problem of articulation.--Thinking and a-thinking through kōan.--The interior and exterior in Zen.--The elimination of color in Far Eastern art and photography.
     
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  8. Dale Stuart Wright (1998). Philosophical Meditations on Zen Buddhism. Cambridge University Press.score: 224.0
    This book is the first to engage Zen Buddhism philosophically on crucial issues from a perspective that is informed by the traditions of western philosophy and religion. It focuses on one renowned Zen master, Huang Po, whose recorded sayings exemplify the spirit of the 'golden age' of Zen in medieval China, and on the transmission of these writings to the West. The author makes a bold attempt to articulate a post-romantic understanding of Zen applicable to contemporary world culture. While (...)
     
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  9. Faustino Luiz Couto Teixeira (2012). A espiritualidade zen budista (Zen Buddhist Spirituality) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2012v10n27p704. Horizonte 10 (27):704-727.score: 216.0
    The comparative study of mysticism and inter-religious spirituality has gained more space in universities and research centers that radiate everywhere. They are also research involving Eastern religions, in its peculiar mystical trait. Also in the context of Buddhism one can talk on spirituality, understood as a search path of liberation. This article presents the theme of Zen Buddhist spirituality based on the reflection of Eihei Dogen Zenji (1200 – 1253), one of the most important and prominent teachers of the (...)
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  10. Robert Aitken (1984). The Mind of Clover: Essays in Zen Buddhist Ethics. North Point Press.score: 202.0
    In Taking the Path of Zen , Robert Aitken provided a concise guide to zazen (Zen meditation) and other aspects of the practice of Zen. In The Mind of Clover he addresses the world beyond the zazen cushions, illuminating issues of appropriate personal and social action through an exploration of the philosophical complexities of Zen ethics. Aitken's approach is clear and sure as he shows how our minds can be as nurturing as clover, which enriches the soil and benefits the (...)
     
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  11. Tim van Gelder (1998). The Roles of Philosophy in Cognitive Science. Philosophical Psychology 11 (2):117-36.score: 183.0
    When the various disciplines participating in cognitive science are listed, philosophy almost always gets a guernsey. Yet, a couple of years ago at the conference of the Cognitive Science Society in Boulder (USA), there was no philosophy or philosopher with any prominence on the program. When queried on this point, the organizer (one of the "superstars" of the field) claimed it was partly an accident, but partly also due to an impression among members of the committee that philosophy is basically (...)
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  12. Matthew E. May (2010). The Shibumi Strategy: A Powerful Way to Create Meaningful Change. Jossey-Bass.score: 183.0
    A personal leadership fable on applying principles of Zen to work and life choices The Shibumi Strategy is a little book about a big breakthrough. It tells the story of a hardworking family man who finds himself in crisis when his company closes. Through his struggle, and guidance from unlikely sources, he learns subtle lessons in the form of "personal zen" principles, coming to understand that it is often the involuntary challenge, the setbacks, that harbor the power to transform. When (...)
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  13. Daniel Capper (2014). The Trees, My Lungs: Self Psychology and the Natural World at an American Buddhist Center. Zygon 49 (3):554-571.score: 180.0
    This study employs ethnographic field data to trace a dialogue between the self-psychological concept of the self object and experiences regarding the concept of “interbeing” at a Vietnamese Buddhist monastery in the United States. The dialogue develops an understanding of human experiences with the nonhuman natural world which are tensive, liminal, and nondual. From the dialogue I find that the self object concept, when applied to this form of Buddhism, must be inclusive enough to embrace relationships with animals, stones, (...)
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  14. Padmasiri De Silva (1992). Buddhist and Freudian Psychology. Singapore University Press, National University of Singapore.score: 176.0
    The work presents in clear focus, comparative perspectives on the nature of Man, Mind, Motivation, Conflict, Anxiety and Suffering, as well as the therapeutic ...
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  15. Christopher Ives (2009). Imperial-Way Zen: Ichikawa Hakugen's Critique and Lingering Questions for Buddhist Ethics. University of Hawai'i Press.score: 176.0
    Despite the importance of Ichikawa's writings, this volume is the first by any scholar to outline his critique.
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  16. W. F. Jayasuriya (1963). The Psychology and Philosophy of Buddhism. Colombo, Y. M. B. A. Press.score: 176.0
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  17. Henry Rosemont Jr (1970). Is Zen Buddhism a Philosophy? Philosophy East and West 20 (1):63-72.score: 168.0
    Following the lead of daisetz t. Suzuki, The authors of almost all english-Language commentaries on zen buddhism are in general agreement that zen is not a philosophy. The primary purpose of this paper is to show how and why this view is fundamentally mistaken and that the continued espousal of it is counterproductive for furthering an understanding of any facet of zen, Philosophical or otherwise.
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  18. Dick Garner (1977). Skepticism, Ordinary Language and Zen Buddhism. Philosophy East and West 27 (2):165-181.score: 168.0
    The goal of tranquility through non-Assertion, Advocated by sextus empiricus, Is examined and his method criticized. His understanding of non-Assertion is compared with that of seng-Chao (383-414) and chi-Tsang (549-623). Zen buddhism shares the quest for tranquility, But offers more than sextus did to help us attain it, And avoids the excessively metaphysical thought of these two chinese buddhists. Wittgenstein, Whose goal was that philosophical problems completely disappear, And austin, Who rejected many standard western dichotomies, Offer a method superior (...)
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  19. Jacob Raz (2010). “Kill the Buddha” Quietism in Action and Quietism as Action in Zen Buddhist Thought and Practice. Common Knowledge 16 (3):439-456.score: 168.0
    A contribution to the sixth installment of the Common Knowledge symposium “Apology for Quietism,” this article proposes that, despite endless debates within Zen Buddhism between quietist tendencies (“sitting quietly, doing nothing”) and the instruction to act in the world (“go wash the dishes”), Zen has always held a nondualist approach that denies any contradiction between these seemingly distinct ways. Zen has never really seen them as distinct. The article does survey, however, several quietist sources for Zen in early Indian (...)
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  20. Donald W. Mitchell (1980). Faith in Zen Buddhism. International Philosophical Quarterly 20 (2):183-197.score: 168.0
    There is an impression among western students of zen buddhism that faith does not play an important role in the zen tradition. This paper argues that in fact faith does have an important function in zen. The analysis relates this function to both the distinctly intuitive nature of enlightenment and the practice of meditation. The thesis is that these two phenomena can be more fully understood when related to the phenomenon of faith rather than simply distinguished from faith. Faith (...)
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  21. Caroline A. F. Rhys Davids (1936). The Birth of Indian Psychology and its Development in Buddhism. London, Luzac & Co..score: 168.0
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  22. Yong Zhi (2013). The Poetic Transmission of Zen Buddhism. Asian Culture and History 5 (2):p25.score: 168.0
    This paper intends to understand the experience of enlightenment in Zen Buddhism from a perspective of poetics. Enlightenment is understood as an existential breakthrough, which delivers people from the habitual or conventional mind set into new horizon of consciousness. This breakthrough takes place in one’s overall consciousness rather than only in cognitive thought. Therefore, it cannot be adequately described on an abstract level with a conceptual paradigm. The poetic language provides a significant alternative for capturing this leap and revealing (...)
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  23. Kazuki Sekida (1985/2005). Zen Training: Methods and Philosophy. Shambhala.score: 165.0
    Zen Training is a comprehensive handbook for zazen , seated meditation practice, and an authoritative presentation of the Zen path. The book marked a turning point in Zen literature in its critical reevaluation of the enlightenment experience, which the author believes has often been emphasized at the expense of other important aspects of Zen training. In addition, Zen Training goes beyond the first flashes of enlightenment to explore how one lives as well as trains in Zen. The author also draws (...)
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  24. Charles Muller, Zen Buddhism and Western Scholarship: Will the Twain Ever Meet?score: 164.0
    If we reflect on the history of Buddhism, we should be able to acknowledge as an anomaly the present yawning chasm to be seen between North American / Japanese academic scholarship that deals with Zen/Chan and the corresponding practice community. We have on one hand a religious tradition that has, due to a combination of its own rhetorical choices and various historical turns, become largely bereft of the ongoing production of significant scholarship concerning its own history and doctrine (...)
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  25. Steven Heine (2013). Like Cats and Dogs: Contesting the Mu Koan in Zen Buddhism. Oup Usa.score: 164.0
    Steven Heine offers a compelling examination of the Mu Koan, widely considered to be the single best known and most widely circulated and transmitted koan record of the Zen school of Buddhism.
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  26. G. T. Jinpa (2000). The Foundations of a Buddhist Psychology of Awakening. In Gay Watson, Stephen Batchelor & Guy Claxton (eds.), The Psychology of Awakening: Buddhism, Science, and Our Day-to-Day Lives. Samuel Weiser. 10--22.score: 164.0
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  27. Steve Odin (2013). Illuminations Of The Quotidian in Nishida, Chan/Zen Buddhism, and Sino‐Japanese Philosophy. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (S1):135-145.score: 164.0
    Return to the ordinary as extraordinary has become the signature motif for the Emersonian perfectionism of Stanley Cavell in contemporary American philosophy. In this article I develop Cavell's notion of “the ordinary” as an intercultural theme for exploring aspects of traditional Chinese philosophy, especially Confucianism and Chan Buddhism. I further use Cavell's philosophy of the ordinary to examine Sino-Japanese thought as found in the Zen tradition of Japan and its reformulation by Nishida Kitarô in modern Japanese philosophy. It will (...)
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  28. Daisetz Teitaro Suzuki (1938). Zen Buddhism and its Influence on Japanese Culture. Kyoto, the Eastern Buddhist Society.score: 152.0
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  29. Tse-fu Kuan (2012). Cognitive Operations in Buddhist Meditation: Interface with Western Psychology. Contemporary Buddhism 13 (1):35-60.score: 150.0
    This paper interprets Buddhist meditation from perspectives of Western psychology and explores the common grounds shared by the two disciplines. Cognitive operations in Buddhist meditation are mainly characterized by mindfulness and concentration in relation to attention. Mindfulness in particular plays a pivotal role in regulating attention. My study based on Buddhist literature corroborates significant correspondence between mindfulness and metacognition as propounded by some psychologists. In vipassan? meditation, mindfulness regulates attention in such a way that attention is directed to monitor (...)
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  30. William Mikulas (2007). Buddhism & Western Psychology: Fundamentals of Integration. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (4):4-49.score: 148.0
    Essential Buddhism, the fundamental teachings of the historical Buddha and the core of all major branches of Buddhism, is psychology, not religion or philosophy. Essential Buddhism is described from a psychological perspective and interrelated with Western psychology in general, and cognitive science, behaviour modification, psychoanalysis, and transpersonal psychology, in specific. Integrating Buddhist psychology and Western psychology yields a more comprehensive psychology and more powerful therapies.
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  31. John Steffney (1977). Transmetaphysical Thinking in Heidegger and Zen Buddhism. Philosophy East and West 27 (3):323-335.score: 146.0
    In heidegger's philosophy, Getting back to the ground of metaphysics--Transcending metaphysics--Entails a transcendence of the ordinary function of human consciousness. Zen's transcendence however--Especially with regard to subject-Object duality--Is much more radical than heidegger's. Even the late heidegger, Heidegger iii, Presents his "ereignis" as a third, Appropriating ontological link, Existing beyond being and nonbeing. But in zen this would be classified as "relative" "sunyata", Not "absolute" "sunyata", Which is neither relative nor relational but paradoxical to the extent that it does not (...)
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  32. Lynken Ghose (2004). A Study in Buddhist Psychology: Is Buddhism Truly Pro‐Detachment and Anti‐Attachment? Contemporary Buddhism 5 (2):105-120.score: 146.0
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  33. Simon P. James (2003). Zen Buddhism and the Intrinsic Value of Nature. Contemporary Buddhism 4 (2):143-157.score: 146.0
    It is a perennial theme in the literature on environmental ethics that the exploitation of the environment is the result of a blindness to (or perhaps a refusal to recognize) the intrinsic value of natural beings. The general story here is that Western traditions of thought have tended to accord natural beings value only to the extent that they prove useful to humans, that they have tended to see nature as only instrumentally valuable. By contrast, it is said that a (...)
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  34. Jack Engler (1998). Buddhist Psychology: Contributions to Western Psychological Theory. In Anthony Molino (ed.), The Couch and the Tree: Dialogues in Psychoanalysis and Buddhism. North Point Press. 111--118.score: 146.0
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  35. Eiko Kawamura-Hanaoka (forthcoming). The Significance of Luke-Acts for Zen Buddhism. Buddhist-Christian Studies.score: 146.0
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  36. Rupert Read (2009). Wittgenstein and Zen Buddhism: One Practice, No Dogma. In Mario D'Amato, Jay L. Garfield & Tom J. F. Tillemans (eds.), Pointing at the Moon: Buddhism, Logic, Analytic Philosophy. Oxford University Press. 13--23.score: 146.0
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  37. Dharma Bell, Dharan ı Pillar, Li Po’S. Buddhist Inscriptions By & Paul W. Kroll (2003). At the Eleventh Hour: The Biography of Swami Rama. By Pandit Rajmani Tigu-Nait, Ph. D. Honesdale, Pennsylvania: Himalayan Institute Press, 2002. Pp. 427. Hardcover $18.95. Awakening and Insight: Zen Buddhism and Psychotherapy. Edited by Polly Young-Eisendrath and Shoji Muramoto. Hove, England: Brunner-Routledge, 2002. [REVIEW] Philosophy East and West 53 (3):431-434.score: 146.0
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  38. Maria Reis Habito (2005). The Voice of God on Mount Sinai: Rabbinic Commentaries on Exodus 20:1 in Light of Sufi and Zen-Buddhist Texts (Review). Buddhist-Christian Studies 24 (1):278-283.score: 146.0
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  39. Eric Sean Nelson (2005). Opening a Mountain: Koans of the Zen Masters, And: The Koan: Texts and Contexts in Zen Buddhism (Review). Buddhist-Christian Studies 24 (1):284-288.score: 146.0
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  40. Joseph S. O'Leary (2001). Philosophical Meditations on Zen Buddhism (Review). Buddhist-Christian Studies 21 (1):147-151.score: 146.0
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  41. Elisabetta Porcu (forthcoming). Staging Zen Buddhism: Image Creation in Contemporary Films. Contemporary Buddhism:1-16.score: 146.0
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  42. Robert Aitken (2009). Who Hears?: A Zen Buddhist Perspective. Buddhist-Christian Studies 29 (1):89-94.score: 146.0
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  43. David W. Chappell (1989). Zen Buddhism and Western Thought. Buddhist-Christian Studies 9:5-60.score: 146.0
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  44. David J. Kalupahana (2008). The Foundations of Early Buddhist Psychology. In K. Ramakrishna Rao (ed.), Handbook of Indian Psychology. Cambridge University Press. 73.score: 146.0
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  45. Shigenori Nagatomo (2008). Japanese Zen Buddhist Philosophy. The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Online Verfügbar Unter Http://Plato. Stanford. Edu/Archives/Fall2008/Entries/Japanese-Zen/, Zuletzt Geprüft Am 31:2010.score: 146.0
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  46. James Mark Shields (2012). Imperial-Way Zen: Ichikawa Hakugen's Critique and Lingering Questions for Buddhist Ethics. Philosophy East and West 62 (1):128-130.score: 144.0
    While there has been a surge in scholarship on Imperial Way Buddhism (kōdō Bukkyō) in the past several decades, little attention has been paid, particularly in Western scholarship, to the life and work of Ichikawa Hakugen (1902–1986), the most prominent and sophisticated postwar critic of the role of Buddhism, and particularly Zen, in modern Japanese militarism. By way of a thorough and critical investigation of Ichikawa’s critique, Imperial-Way Zen: Ichikawa Hakugen’s Critique and Lingering Questions for Buddhist Ethics by (...)
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  47. Sangharakshita (1998). Know Your Mind: The Psychological Dimension of Ethics in Buddhism. Windhorse.score: 144.0
    Know Your Mind is an accessible introduction to traditional Buddhist psychology, offering a clear description of the nature of mind and how it functions.
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  48. Jin Park (2010). Buddhism and Postmodernity: Zen, Huayan, and the Possibility of Buddhist Postmodern Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield.score: 144.0
    Through a close analysis of Zen encounter dialogues (gong'ans) and Huayan Buddhist philosophy, Buddhism and Postmodernity offers a new ethical paradigm for Buddhist-postmodern philosophy.
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  49. H. Hudson (1973). Wittgenstein and Zen Buddhism. Philosophy East and West 23 (4):471-481.score: 140.0
  50. Hu Shih (1953). Ch'an (Zen) Buddhism in China its History and Method. Philosophy East and West 3 (1):3-24.score: 140.0
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