Search results for 'Zionism Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  7
    Yotam Hotam (2012). Modern Gnosis and Zionism: The Crisis of Culture, Life Philosophy and Jewish National Thought. Routledge.
    Germany, the crisis of culture and secular theology -- Life philosophy or modern gnosis -- Modern Jewish gnosis -- Modern gnosis and Zionist thought.
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  2.  11
    Eyal Chowers (2011). The Political Philosophy of Zionism: Trading Jewish Words for an Hebraic Land. Cambridge University Press.
    Jews and the temporal imaginations of modernity -- The Zionist temporal revolution -- The End of building -- Hebrew and politics.
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  3.  32
    Moshe Hellinger (2008). A Clearly Democratic Religious-Zionist Philosophy: The Early Thought of Yeshayahu Leibowitz. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 16 (2):253-282.
    In his early teaching, from the 1920s through the 1950s, Yeshayahu Leibowitz (1903-1994) stands out as one of the most fascinating religious Zionist thinkers. He strives to establish a Jewish democratic state whose democratic aspects will be channeled toward the establishment of an exemplary society, one that can express its religious roots within a modern democratic context. Leibowitz thus attaches enormous importance to democracy in terms of both its political components and its modern Orthodox aspirations. In this respect, he is (...)
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  4.  4
    Dov Schwartz (2009). Maimonides in Religious-Zionist Philosophy: Unity Vs. Duality. In James T. Robinson (ed.), The Cultures of Maimonideanism: New Approaches to the History of Jewish Thought. Brill 9--385.
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  5. Eyal Chowers (2014). The Political Philosophy of Zionism: Trading Jewish Words for a Hebraic Land. Cambridge University Press.
    Zionism emerged at the end of the nineteenth century in response to a rise in anti-Semitism in Europe and to the crisis of modern Jewish identity. This novel, national revolution aimed to unite a scattered community, defined mainly by shared texts and literary tradition, into a vibrant political entity destined for the Holy Land. However, Zionism was about much more than a national political ideology and practice. By tracing its origins in the context of a European history of (...)
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  6. Eyal Chowers (2012). The Political Philosophy of Zionism: Trading Jewish Words for a Hebraic Land. Cambridge University Press.
    Zionism emerged at the end of the nineteenth century in response to a rise in anti-Semitism in Europe and to the crisis of modern Jewish identity. This novel, national revolution aimed to unite a scattered community, defined mainly by shared texts and literary tradition, into a vibrant political entity destined for the Holy Land. However, Zionism was about much more than a national political ideology and practice. By tracing its origins in the context of a European history of (...)
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  7.  5
    J. E. Cooper (2014). Book Review: The Political Philosophy of Zionism: Trading Jewish Words for a Hebraic Land, by Eyal Chowers. [REVIEW] Political Theory 42 (2):232-235.
  8.  9
    Joseph Agassi (1984). II. Nationalism and the Philosophy of Zionism. Inquiry 27 (1-4):311-326.
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  9.  6
    Robert Eisen (2011). The Peace and Violence of Judaism: From the Bible to Modern Zionism. Oxford University Press.
    Introduction -- The Bible -- Rabbinic Judaism -- Medieval Jewish philosophy -- Kabbalah -- Modern Zionism -- Conclusions.
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  10.  20
    Judith Butler (2012). Parting Ways: Jewishness and the Critique of Zionism. Columbia University Press.
    Revisiting Edward Said's late proposals for a one-state solution, Butler has come to a startling suggestion: Jewish ethics not only demand a critique of Zionism, but must transcend its exclusive Jewishness in order to realize the ethical ...
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  11.  4
    Sheldon Richmond (2015). David Novak, Zionism and Judaism:A New Theory. Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 35 (5):278-280.
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  12.  60
    Martin Buber (2002). The Martin Buber Reader: Essential Writings. Palgrave Macmillan.
    There is no adequate understanding of contemporary Jewish and Christian theology without reference to Martin Buber. Buber wrote numerous books during his lifetime (1878-1965) and is best known for I and Thouand Good and Evil. Buber has influenced important Protestant theologians like Karl Barth, Emil Brunner, Paul Tillich, and Reinhold Niebuhr. His appeal is vast--not only is he renowned for his translations of the Hebrew Bible but also for his interpretation of Hasidism, his role in Zionism, and his writings (...)
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  13. Raymond Goldwater (1962). Jewish Philosophy and Philosophers. London, Hillel Foundation.
    Is there a Jewish philosophy? By L. Roth.--Philo and Judaism in Alexandria, by R. Loewe.--Maimonides, by I. Epstein.--The mystical school, by L. Jacobs.--Spinoza, by D. D. Raphael.--Philosophers and the emancipation, by D. Patterson.--Zionist philosophers, by D. Patterson.--Franz Rosenzweig and the existentialist philosophers, by I. Maybaum.
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  14. Gideon Katz (2011). The Pale God: Israeli Secularism and Spinoza's Philosopy of Culture. Academic Studies Press.
    The Pale God examines the relationship between secularism and religious tradition. It begins with a description of the secular options as expressed by Israeli intellectuals, and describes how these options have led to a dead end. A new option must be sought, and one of the key sources for this option is the works of Spinoza. The author explains that unlike Nietzsche, who discussed "the death of God," Spinoza tried to undermine the authority of religious virtuosos and establish the image (...)
     
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  15.  5
    Eliezer Schweid (2008). The Idea of Modern Jewish Culture. Academic Studies Press.
    This is a large, complex story in which the author describes the contributions of Mendelssohn, Wessely, Krochmal, Zunz, the mainstream Zionist thinkers ...
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  16. Yosef Badiḥi (2004). Geʼulat or Ha-Tsevi: Le-Mishnato Ha-Eloḳit, Ha-Toranit, Ha-Emunit, Ha-Medinit Shel ... Ha-Rav Tsevi Yehudah Ha-Kohen Ḳuḳ, Z. Ts. Ṿe-Ḳ.L. .. [REVIEW] [Ḥ Mo. L.].
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  17. Yosef Badiḥi (2004). Geʼulat or Ha-Tsevi: Le-Mishnato Ha-Eloḳit, Ha-Toranit, Ha-Emunit, Ha-Medinit Shel. [Ḥ Mo. L.].
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  18. Mikhael Benadmon (2013). Mered Ṿi-Yetsirah Ba-Hagut Ha-Tsiyonut Ha-Datit: Mosheh Una U-Mahpekhat Ha-Ḳibuts Ha-Dati. Universiṭat Bar-Ilan.
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  19. Arie L. Eliav (1988). New Heart, New Spirit: Biblical Humanism for Modern Israel. Jewish Publication Society.
    In the words of the author,` this book represents an attempt to raise anew the banner of human values sanctified in the Book of Books and it is a call to rally ...
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  20. Reuven Gerber (2005). Mahpekhat Ha-Heʼarah: Darko Ha-Ruḥanit Shel Ha-Reʼiyah Ḳuḳ. Hotsaʼat Ha-Sifriyah Ha-Tsiyonit.
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  21.  7
    Nahum Norbert Glatzer (ed.) (1969/1982). The Judaic Tradition: Texts. Behrman House.
    The rest is commentary.--Faith and knowledge.--The dynamics of emancipation.
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  22. Shai Horev (2011). Tsiyoni U-Filosof: Hashḳafat ʻolamo U-Meḳomo Ha-Ideʼologi Shel Mordekhai Marṭin Buber, Hogeh Deʼot Tsiyoni, Mi-Yeme Ha-"Hitʼaḥdut" Li-"Berit Shalom". [REVIEW] Dukhifat.
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  23. Mosheh Kalfon (2009). Tehilah le-Mosheh: Peraḳim Be-Mishnato Ha-Tsiyonit Shel Ha-Rav Kalfon Mosheh Ha-Kohen (Ha-Kamah), Zatsal. ReʼUven Mamu.
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  24. Yosef Salmon (2006). Im Taʻiru Ṿe-Im Teʻoreru: Orṭodoḳsiyah Bi-Metsare Ha-Leʼumiyut. Merkaz Zalman Shazar le-Toldot YiśraʼEl.
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  25. Hizky Shoham (2013). Mordekhai Rokhev ʻal Sus: Ḥagigot Purim Be-Tel-Aviv, 1908-1936, U-Veniyatah Shel Umah Ḥadashah. Hotsaʼat Universiṭat Bar-Ilan.
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  26.  2
    Shmuel Lederman (2016). Making the Desert Bloom: Hannah Arendt and Zionist Discourse. The European Legacy 21 (4):393-407.
    This article discusses an aspect of Hannah Arendt’s treatment of the conflict between the Zionists and the Palestinians that has thus far been overlooked in scholarship: her justification of Zionism through the achievements of the Jewish pioneers in cultivating the land, in contrast to the Palestinians’ failure to do so. The inability of natives to cultivate their land was a familiar argument in the history of colonialism, used to legitimize the colonialists’ right to settle a land and often to (...)
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  27.  12
    Yossi Dahan & Gal Levy (2000). Multicultural Education in the Zionist State €“ The Mizrahi Challenge. Studies in Philosophy and Education 19 (5/6):423-444.
    In this paper, we explore a specific variant of multicultural education inIsrael that developed within the dominant Jewish cultural identity, that isthe claim of Jews from Islamic countries (Mizrahi Jews) for educational autonomy. This demand arose against the backdrop of an aggressive nationalist ideology – Zionism – that claimed torepresent all Jews, and yet was too ambivalent toward its non-European Jewish subjects. The Mizrahi Jews' dual identity, as Jews and as products of the Arab culture, conflated with the state's (...)
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  28. S. Daniel Breslauer (forthcoming). Martin Buber’s Myth of Zion: National Education or Counter-Education? Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-19.
    If national education is, as Ilan Gur-Ze’ev thinks, inevitably a matter of agents for and victims of a national system, only a “counter-education” can correct it. Martin Buber shared many of Gur-Ze’ev’s concerns, but advocated a more positive view of national education. This essay examines Buber’s development of his pedagogical theory in its context, notes his influence on several educational models, investigates how his view of national education either continues or is ignored in the modern State of Israel, and shows (...)
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  29.  4
    Iulia Grad (2010). Michael Zank, New Perspectives on Martin Buber. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 7 (19):255-259.
    MICHAEL ZANK, NEW PERSPECTIVES ON MARTIN BUBER, TÜBINGEN: MOHR SIEBECK, 2006.
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  30. Gil Eyal (ed.) (2012). Arbaʻ Hartsaʼot ʻal Teʼoryah Biḳortit. Ha-Ḳibuts Ha-MeʼUḥad.
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  31. Zvi Gastwirth, Zion Ukashy, Sigalit Rosmarin, Yiśraʼ Rozenson & el (eds.) (2006). Be-Mishʻole ʻavar Yehudi: Meḥḳarim Ṿe-Zikhronot Li-Khevodo Shel Dr. Tsevi Gasṭṿirṭ, Rosh Mikhlelet Efratah. Mikhlelet Efratah.
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  32. Zvi Gastwirth, Zion Ukashy, Sigalit Rosmarin, Yiśraʼ Rozenson & el (eds.) (2006). Be-Mishʻole ʻavar Yehudi: Meḥḳarim Ṿe-Zikhronot Li-Khevodo Shel Dr. Mikhlelet Efratah.
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  33. Zvi Gastwirth, Zion Ukashy, Sigalit Rosmarin & Yiśraʼel Rozenson (eds.) (2006). Be-Mishʻole ʻavar Yehudi: Meḥḳarim Ṿe-Zikhronot Li-Khevodo Shel Dr. Tsevi Gasṭṿirṭ, Rosh Mikhlelet Efratah. Mikhlelet Efratah.
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  34. Jacob Golomb (2006). Nietzsche and Zion. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 31:71-72.
     
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  35. Joëlle Hansel (ed.) (2007). Levinas à Jérusalem. Klincksieck.
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  36. Alexander Sissel Kohanski (1987). Upon My Words. Bloch Pub. Co..
     
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  37. Yeshayahu Leibowitz (2013). Lebovits Mitpalmes: Timlul Ṿe-Teʻud Ṿideʼo Shel 13 Sheʻot Pulmus: Yeshaʻayahu Leibovits Mitpalmes Be-Hanḥayat Yonah Hadari ʻim Avi Śagi, Zeʼev Harvi, Mosheh Halberṭal, Tamar Ros, Yaʻaḳov Leṿinger, Eliʻezer Goldman, Asa Kasher, ʻazmi Basharah Ṿe-Yosi Ziv. [REVIEW] Karmel.
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  38. Einat Ramon (2007). Ḥayim Ḥadashim: Dat, Imahut Ṿe-Ahavah ʻelyonah Be-Haguto Shel Aharon Daṿid Gordon. Karmel.
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  39. Leo Strauss & Michael Zank (2002). Leo Strauss the Early Writings, 1921-1932. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  40. Joel Teitelbaum (2006). Ḳunṭres Yalḳut Amarim: Bo Nilḳeṭu Devarim ... Mi-Sefer ... "Ṿa-Yoʼel Mosheh" ... Be-ʻinyan Ḥomer Ha-Isur Shel Hishtatfut Ba-Beḥirot Be-E. Ha-Ḳ. .. [REVIEW] Yalḳuṭ Amarim "Ṿa-YoʼEl Mosheh".
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  41. Joel Teitelbaum (2006). Ḳunṭres Yalḳut Amarim: Bo Nilḳeṭu Devarim. Yalḳuṭ Amarim "Ṿa-YoʼEl Mosheh".
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  42.  16
    Yehouda Shenhav (2007). Modernity and the Hybridization of Nationalism and Religion: Zionism and the Jews of the Middle East as a Heuristic Case. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 36 (1):1-30.
  43.  10
    William Paul Simmons (2000). Zionism, Place, and the Other. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 7 (1):21-25.
    This essay expands on the recent writings on Levinas’s politics by discussing his explicit comments about international relations. Levinas embraces neither a naive idealism nor a cold realism. Instead, he searches far a third way, that is, an oscillation between idealism and realism. There is a place for realism, but the power of the state must be held in check by the ethical responsibility for the Other. This oscillation is examined in relation to Levinas’s writings on “place” and Zionism. (...)
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  44. Shlomo Avineri (1984). The Making of Modern Zionism: The Intellectual Origins of the Jewish State. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 15 (3):181-182.
     
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  45. Isaiah Berlin (2000). The Power of Ideas. Princeton University Press.
    The essays collected in this new volume reveal Isaiah Berlin at his most lucid and accessible. He was constitutionally incapable of writing with the opacity of the specialist, but these shorter, more introductory pieces provide the perfect starting-point for the reader new to his work. Those who are already familiar with his writing will also be grateful for this further addition to his collected essays. The connecting theme of these essays, as in the case of earlier volumes, is the crucial (...)
     
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  46. Steven B. Smith (1997). Spinoza, Liberalism, and the Question of Jewish Identity. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    Baruch de Spinoza —often recognized as the first modern Jewish thinker—was also a founder of modern liberal political philosophy. This book is the first to connect systematically these two aspects of Spinoza's legacy. Steven B. Smith shows that Spinoza was a politically engaged theorist who both advocated and embodied a new conception of the emancipated individual, a thinker who decisively influenced such diverse movements as the Enlightenment, liberalism, and political Zionism. Focusing on Spinoza's _Theologico-Political Treatise_, (...) argues that Spinoza was the first thinker of note to make the civil status of Jews and Judaism an essential ingredient of modern political thought. Before Marx or Freud, Smith notes, Spinoza recast Judaism to include the liberal values of autonomy and emancipation from tradition. Smith examines the circumstances of Spinoza's excommunication from the Jewish community of Amsterdam, his skeptical assault on the authority of Scripture, his transformation of Mosaic prophecy into a progressive philosophy of history, his use of the language of natural right and the social contract to defend democratic political institutions, and his comprehensive comparison of the ancient Hebrew commonwealth and the modern commercial republic. According to Smith, Spinoza's _Treatise_ represents a classic defense of religious toleration and intellectual freedom, showing them to be necessary foundations for political stability and liberal regimes. In this study Smith examines Spinoza's solution to the Jewish Question and asks whether a Judaism, so conceived, can long survive. (shrink)
     
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  47.  7
    Gerhard Biller (1990). Early Zionism and the Jews. Studies on the Programmes and Historical Context of Early Zionism Up to 1897. Philosophy and History 23 (2):181-183.
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  48.  5
    Lawrence S. Stepelevich (1989). Moses Hess: Prophet of Communism and Zionism. Journal of the History of Philosophy 27 (3):491-493.
  49. Sd Breslauer (1994). Kaplan, Mordecai Approach to Jewish Mysticism+ the Cabala and the Transformation of Medieval Validation Into Modern Zionism. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 4 (1):39-54.
     
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  50. Raphael Loewe (1947). A Jewish Answer to Zionism'. Hibbert Journal: A Quarterly Review of Religion, Theology and Philosophy 45 (2):137-43.
     
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