Search results for 'Zsuzsanna Chappell' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Zsuzsanna Chappell (2008). Rational Choice and Democratic Deliberation: A Theory of Discourse Failure, by Guido Pincione and Fernando R. Tesón, 2006, XI + 258 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 24 (1):105-111.score: 240.0
  2. Zsuzsanna Chappell (2011). Justifying Deliberative Democracy: Are Two Heads Always Wiser Than One|[Quest]|. Contemporary Political Theory 10 (1):78.score: 240.0
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  3. V. Chappell, Symposium: Locke and the Veil of Perception Guest Editor: Vere Chappell - Comments.score: 180.0
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  4. T. D. J. Chappell (2004/2005). Reading Plato's Theaetetus. Hackett Pub. Co..score: 60.0
    Timothy Chappell’s new translation of the Theaetetus is presented here in short sections of text, each preceded by a summary of the argument and followed by his philosophical commentary on it. Introductory remarks discuss Plato and his works, his use of dialogue, the structure of the Theaetetus, and alternative interpretations of the work as a whole. A glossary and bibliography are provided.
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  5. Vere Chappell (2004). Symposium: Locke and the Veil of Perception Preface. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 85 (3):243–244.score: 60.0
    This symposium comprises five papers on Locke's theory of sense perception. The authors are John Rogers, Gideon Yaffe, Lex Newman, Tom Lennon, and Martha Bolton. There are also comments on the papers, both individually and as a group, by Vere Chappell. In addition to Locke's view of perception, the papers deal with the nature of Lockean ideas and with the question whether Locke is committed to skepticism regarding the external world. The authors (and the commentator) disagree in their readings (...)
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  6. Vere Chappell (ed.) (1998). Locke. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    Oxford Readings in Philosophy -/- The aim of this series is to bring together important recent writings in major areas of philosophical inquiry, selected from a variety of sources, mostly periodicals, which may not be conveniently available to the university student or the general reader. The editors of each volume contribute an introductory essay on the items chosen and on the questions with which they deal. A selective bibliography is appended as a guide to further reading. -/- This new volume (...)
     
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  7. Richard Yetter Chappell (2013). Value Receptacles. Noûs 47 (3):n/a-n/a.score: 30.0
    Utilitarianism is often rejected on the grounds that it fails to respect the separateness of persons, instead treating people as mere “receptacles of value”. I develop several different versions of this objection, and argue that, despite their prima facie plausibility, they are all mistaken. Although there are crude forms of utilitarianism that run afoul of these objections, I advance a new form of the view—‘token-pluralistic utilitarianism’—that does not.
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  8. Richard Yetter Chappell (forthcoming). Knowing What Matters. In Peter Singer (ed.), Does Anything Really Matter? Parfit on Objectivity. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    Parfit's On What Matters offers a rousing defence of non-naturalist normative realism against pressing metaphysical and epistemological objections. He addresses skeptical arguments based on (i) the causal origins of our normative beliefs, and (ii) the appearance of pervasive moral disagreement. In both cases, he concedes the first step to the skeptic, but draws a subsequent distinction with which he hopes to stem the skeptic's advance. I argue, however, that these distinctions cannot bear the weight that Parfit places on them. A (...)
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  9. Richard Yetter Chappell (2012). Fittingness: The Sole Normative Primitive. Philosophical Quarterly 62 (249):684 - 704.score: 30.0
    This paper draws on the 'Fitting Attitudes' analysis of value to argue that we should take the concept of fittingness (rather than value) as our normative primitive. I will argue that the fittingness framework enhances the clarity and expressive power of our normative theorising. Along the way, we will see how the fittingness framework illuminates our understanding of various moral theories, and why it casts doubt on the Global Consequentialist idea that acts and (say) eye colours are normatively on a (...)
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  10. Helen Yetter-Chappell & Richard Yetter Chappell (2013). Mind-Body Meets Metaethics: A Moral Concept Strategy. Philosophical Studies 165 (3):865-878.score: 30.0
    The aim of this paper is to assess the relationship between anti-physicalist arguments in the philosophy of mind and anti-naturalist arguments in metaethics, and to show how the literature on the mind-body problem can inform metaethics. Among the questions we will consider are: (1) whether a moral parallel of the knowledge argument can be constructed to create trouble for naturalists, (2) the relationship between such a "Moral Knowledge Argument" and the familiar Open Question Argument, and (3) how naturalists can respond (...)
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  11. Timothy Chappell (2007). Integrity and Demandingness. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (3):255 - 265.score: 30.0
    I discuss Bernard Williams’ ‘integrity objection’ – his version of the demandingness objection to unreasonably demanding ‘extremist’ moral theories such as consequentialism – and argue that it is best understood as presupposing the internal reasons thesis. However, since the internal reasons thesis is questionable, so is Williams’ integrity objection. I propose an alternative way of bringing out the unreasonableness of extremism, based on the notion of the agent’s autonomy, and show how an objection to this proposal can be outflanked by (...)
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  12. Timothy Chappell (2002). Two Distinctions That Do Make a Difference: The Action/Omission Distinction and the Principle of Double Effect. Philosophy 77 (2):211-233.score: 30.0
    The paper outlines and explores a possible strategy for defending both the action/omission distinction (AOD) and the principle of double effect (PDE). The strategy is to argue that there are degrees of actionhood, and that we are in general less responsible for what has a lower degree of actionhood, because of that lower degree. Moreover, what we omit generally has a lower degree of actionhood than what we actively do, and what we do under known-but-not-intended descriptions generally has a lower (...)
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  13. Vere Chappell, Descartes’s Compatibilism.score: 30.0
    Compatibilism is the doctrine that the doctrine of determinism is logically consistent with the doctrine of libertarianism. Determinism is the doctrine that every being and event is brought about by causes other than itself. Libertarianism is the doctrine that some human actions are free. Was Descartes a compatibilist? There is no doubt that he was a libertarian: his works are full of professions of freedom, human as well as divine. And though he held that God has no cause other than (...)
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  14. Vere Chappell (1994). Locke on the Freedom of the Will. In G. A. J. Rogers (ed.), Locke's Philosophy: Content and Context. Oxford University Press. 101--21.score: 30.0
    Locke was a libertarian: he believed in human freedom. To be sure, his conception of freedom was different from that of many philosophers who call themselves libertarians. Some such philosophers maintain that an agent is free only if her action is uncaused; whereas Locke thought that all actions have causes, including the free ones. Some libertarians hold that no action is free unless it proceeds from a volition that is itself free; whereas Locke argued that free volition, as opposed to (...)
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  15. Timothy Chappell (2009). Infinity Goes Up on Trial: Must Immortality Be Meaningless? European Journal of Philosophy 17 (1):30-44.score: 30.0
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  16. Timothy Chappell (2011). On the Very Idea of Criteria for Personhood. Southern Journal of Philosophy 49 (1):1-27.score: 30.0
    I examine the familiar criterial view of personhood, according to which the possession of personal properties such as self-consciousness, emotionality, sentience, and so forth is necessary and sufficient for the status of a person. I argue that this view confuses criteria for personhood with parts of an ideal of personhood. In normal cases, we have already identified a creature as a person before we start looking for it to manifest the personal properties, indeed this pre-identification is part of what makes (...)
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  17. Timothy Chappell (2009). Ethics Beyond Moral Theory. Philosophical Investigations 32 (3):206-243.score: 30.0
    I develop an anti-theory view of ethics. Moral theory (Kantian, utilitarian, virtue ethical, etc.) is the dominant approach to ethics among academic philosophers. But moral theory's hunt for a single Master Factor (utility, universalisability, virtue . . .) is implausibly systematising and reductionist. Perhaps scientism drives the approach? But good science always insists on respect for the data, even messy data: I criticise Singer's remarks on infanticide as a clear instance of moral theory failing to respect the data of moral (...)
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  18. Vere Chappell (1994). 2 Locke's Theory of Ideas. In V. C. Chappell (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Locke. Cambridge University Press. 26.score: 30.0
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  19. Timothy Chappell (2002). Review: The Demands of Consequentialism. [REVIEW] Mind 111 (444):891-897.score: 30.0
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  20. Timothy Chappell (2012). The Fear of Death. Think 11 (30):57-71.score: 30.0
    Of course there is a long history of such sayings in all the world’s main spiritual traditions. Socrates’ remark reminds us at once of Solon’s doleful doctrine that we should call no man happy until he is dead (Herodotus Histories Book 1; Aristotle Nicomachean Ethics 1100a11). And Bonhoeffer’s famous saying, while it echoes the typical teaching of many Christian spiritual masters, for instance St Thomas à Kempis and Bianco da Siena (the author of that beautiful hymn “Come down O Love (...)
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  21. Timothy Chappell (2010). Reviews Self-Constitution: Agency, Identity, and Integrity . By Christine M. Korsgaard. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009, Pp. XIV+230, £45.00. [REVIEW] Philosophy 85 (3):424-432.score: 30.0
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  22. Vere Chappell, Locke on the Suspension of Desire.score: 30.0
    In the first edition of the Essay concerning Human Understanding, Locke claims that human beings have freedom of action - that is, that some of their actions are free - but that they do not have freedom of will - that is, that none of their volitions are free. Volitions themselves are actions for Locke; they are operations of the will and hence acts of willing. And volitions give rise to other actions: an action that follows and is caused by (...)
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  23. Richard Yetter Chappell, Value Holism.score: 30.0
    This paper considers the relation between the value of a whole (person, society) and its parts (timeslices, individuals), arguing that the contributory value of a part cannot be determined in isolation. For example, the value of an additional life may depend on what other lives there are. This has important implications for population ethics, and especially Parfit's 'repugnant conclusion'.
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  24. Timothy Chappell (1998). Reductionism About Persons; and What Matters. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 98 (1):41-58.score: 30.0
    This paper's ?I examines Derek Parfit's main, metaphysical, argument for reductionism about personal identity. ?II considers three possible ethical arguments for reductionism, and suggests a new approach to the question of what matters about personal identity which has to do with the notion of an ethical narrative.
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  25. Timothy Chappell (2011). Glory as an Ethical Idea. Philosophical Investigations 34 (2):105-134.score: 30.0
    There is a gap between what we think and what we think we think about ethics. This gap appears when elements of our ethical reflection and our moral theories contradict each other. It also appears when something that is important in our ethical reflection is sidelined in our moral theories. The gap appears in both ways with the ethical idea glory. The present exploration of this idea is a case study of how far actual ethical reflection diverges from moral theory. (...)
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  26. Vere C. Chappell (1963). The Concept of Dreaming. Philosophical Quarterly 13 (July):193-213.score: 30.0
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  27. Timothy Chappell (2008). Moral Perception. Philosophy 83 (4):421-437.score: 30.0
    I develop an account of moral perception which is able to deal well with familiar naturalistic non-realist complaints about ontological extravagance and ‘queerness’. I show how this account can also ground a cogent response to familiar objections presented by Simon Blackburn (about supervenience) and J.L. Mackie (about motivation). The familiar realist's problem about relativism, however, remains.
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  28. Vere Chappell (1990). Locke on the Ontology of Matter, Living Things and Persons. Philosophical Studies 60 (1-2):19 - 32.score: 30.0
  29. Vere Chappell (1997). Descartes's Ontology. Topoi 16 (2):111-127.score: 30.0
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  30. T. D. J. Chappell (2006). Reading the Περιτροπή: "Theaetetus" 170c-171c. Phronesis 51 (2):109 - 139.score: 30.0
    Two readings of the much-discussed περιτροπή argument of "Theaetetus" 170c-171c have dominated the literature. One I call "the relativity reading". On this reading, the argument fails by ignoratio elenchi because it "carelessly" omits "the qualifications 'true for so-and-so' which [Protagoras'] theory insists on" (Bostock 1988: 90). The other reading I call "the many-worlds interpretation". On this view, Plato's argument succeeds in showing that "Protagoras' position becomes utterly self-contradictory" because "he claims that everyone lives in his own relativistic world, yet at (...)
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  31. Timothy Chappell (2001). Anthropocentrism and the Problem of Natural Evil: A Note. Ratio 14 (1):84–85.score: 30.0
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  32. Timothy Chappell (2012). Climbing Which Mountain? A Critical Study of Derek Parfit On What Matters (OUP 2011). Philosophical Investigations 35 (2):167-181.score: 30.0
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  33. Timothy Chappell (2010). Mi-Kyoung Lee's Epistemology After Protagoras: Responses to Relativism in Plato, Aristotle, and Democritus. Philosophical Books 51 (2):117-125.score: 30.0
  34. Vere Chappell (1989). Locke and Relative Identity. History of Philosophy Quarterly 6 (1):69 - 83.score: 30.0
    LOCKE'S DISCUSSION OF ORGANISMS AND PERSONS IN "ESSAY" II.XXVI HAS LED GEACH AND OTHERS TO ATTRIBUTE THE THESIS OF RELATIVE IDENTITY TO HIM; THAT X IS NEVER IDENTICAL WITH Y "TOUT COURT" BUT ONLY RELATIVE TO SOME SORTAL PROPERTY F: X IS THE SAME F AS Y. I ARGUE THAT THIS ATTRIBUTION RESTS ON A MISUNDERSTANDING OF LOCKE'S POSITION. LOCKE INDEED HOLDS THAT AN OLD TREE MAY BE THE SAME OAK AS THE SEEDLING FROM WHICH IT GREW, WHEREAS THE PARTICLES (...)
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  35. Vere Chappell (1973). Matter. Journal of Philosophy 70 (19):679-696.score: 30.0
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  36. Timothy Chappell (2009). Philosophy as a Humanistic Discipline – by Bernard Williamsthe Sense of the Past – by Bernard Williams. Philosophical Investigations 32 (4):360-371.score: 30.0
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  37. T. D. J. Chappell (1993). The Virtues of Thrasymachus. Phronesis 38 (1):1 - 17.score: 30.0
  38. Timothy Chappell (2010). Ethical Blind-Spots: Why Socrates Was Not a Cosmopolitan. Ratio 23 (1):17-33.score: 30.0
    Though Socrates can easily look like a cosmopolitan in moral and political theory, a closer reading of the relevant texts shows that, in the most important sense of the term as we now use it, he turns out – disappointingly, perhaps – not to be. The reasons why not are instructive and important, both for readers of Plato and for political theorists; they have to do with the phenomenon that I shall call ethical blind-spots.
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  39. Timothy Chappell (1995). Personal Identity, R-Relatedness, and the Empty Question Argument. Philosophical Quarterly 45 (178):88-92.score: 30.0
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  40. Vere Chappell (2005). Self-Determination. In Christia Mercer (ed.), Early Modern Philosophy: Mind, Matter, and Metaphysics. Oxford University Press. 127--41.score: 30.0
  41. Vere Chappell (1994). Locke on the Intellectual Basis of Sin. Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (2):197-207.score: 30.0
    The Essay concerning Human Understanding was published at the end of 1689.1 It sold well, and within three years Locke was planning revisions for a second edition. Among those whose “advice and assistance” he sought was the Irish scientist William Molyneux. Locke had begun a correspondence with Molyneux a few months before, after the latter had lavishly praised the Essay and its author in the Epistle Dedicatory of his own Dioptrica Nova, published early in 1692. Here was a man, Locke (...)
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  42. Timothy Chappell, Ethics and Experience: Life Beyond Moral Theory.score: 30.0
    Ethics and Experience presents a wide-ranging and thought-provoking introduction to the question famously posed by Socrates: “How is life to be lived?” An excellent primer for any student taking a course on moral philosophy, the book introduces ethics as a single and broadly unified field of inquiry in which we apply reason to try and solve Socrates’ question. Ethics and Experience examines the major forms of ethical subjectivism and objectivism - including expressivism, “error theory”, naturalism, and intuitionism. The book lays (...)
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  43. Vere Chappell, Hoffman on Principal Attributes.score: 30.0
    In Principles I. 53, Descartes states what appears to be an important metaphysical principle: P1: Each substance has one principal property, which constitutes its nature and essence, and to which all its other properties are referred (AT VIIIA 25; CSM I 210).1 Marleen Rozemond calls this Descartes's "Attributes Premise", and it leads directly, as she points out, to Cartesian Dualism, the doctrine that a human mind and a human body, even when they belong to the same human being, are distinct (...)
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  44. T. Chappell (2006). Reading the Peritropē: Theaetetus 170c–171c. Phronesis 51:109-139.score: 30.0
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  45. Richard Yetter Chappell (2012). On What Matters. By Parfit. Oxford University Press, 2011, Pp. 1140, £30, ISBN: 9780199265923. [REVIEW] Philosophy 87 (04):599-603.score: 30.0
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  46. Richard Yetter Chappell (2014). The Limits of Kindness. By Caspar Hare. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 201403.score: 30.0
  47. Tim Chappell (2009). Douglas Hedley Living Forms of the Imagination . (London: T. & T. Clark, 2008). Pp. X+308. £65.00 (Hbk); £24.99 (Pbk). Isbn 0567032949 (Hbk); 0567032957 (Pbk). [REVIEW] Religious Studies 45 (2):241-247.score: 30.0
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  48. Vere Chappell (1990). Locke's Moral Psychology. Journal of Philosophy 87 (10):524-525.score: 30.0
  49. Timothy Chappell (2003). Practical Rationality for Pluralists About the Good. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 6 (2):161-177.score: 30.0
    I argue that if a normative theory of practical rationality is to represent an adequate and coherent response to a plurality of incommensurable goods, it cannot be a maximising theory. It will have to be a theory that recognises two responses to goods as morally licit – promotion and respect – and one as morally illicit – violation. This result has a number of interesting corollaries, some of which I indicate. Perhaps the most interesting is that it makes the existence (...)
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  50. Timothy Chappell, Plato on Knowledge in the Theaetetus. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 30.0
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