Search results for 'ability' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Knowledge As Ability (2011). Chapter One Knowledge, Ability, and Manifestation Part One: Knowledge As Ability. In Tolksdorf Stephan (ed.), Conceptions of Knowledge. De Gruyter. 71.score: 180.0
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  2. Sam Coleman (2009). Why the Ability Hypothesis is Best Forgotten. Journal of Consciousness Studies 16 (2-3):74-97.score: 24.0
    According to the knowledge argument, physicalism fails because when physically omniscient Mary first sees red, her gain in phenomenal knowledge involves a gain in factual knowledge. Thus not all facts are physical facts. According to the ability hypothesis, the knowledge argument fails because Mary only acquires abilities to imagine, remember and recognise redness, and not new factual knowledge. I argue that reducing Mary’s new knowledge to abilities does not affect the issue of whether she also learns factually: I show (...)
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  3. Yuri Cath (2009). The Ability Hypothesis and the New Knowledge-How. Noûs 43 (1):137-156.score: 24.0
    What follows for the ability hypothesis reply to the knowledge argument if knowledge-how is just a form of knowledge-that? The obvious answer is that the ability hypothesis is false. For the ability hypothesis says that, when Mary sees red for the first time, Frank Jackson’s super-scientist gains only knowledge-how and not knowledge-that. In this paper I argue that this obvious answer is wrong: a version of the ability hypothesis might be true even if knowledge-how is a (...)
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  4. Torin Alter (2001). Know-How, Ability, and the Ability Hypothesis. Theoria 67 (3):229-39.score: 24.0
    David Lewis (1983, 1988) and Laurence Nemirow (1980, 1990) claim that knowing what an experience is like is knowing-how, not knowing-that. They identify this know-how with the abilities to remember, imagine, and recognize experiences, and Lewis labels their view ‘the Ability Hypothesis’. The Ability Hypothesis has intrinsic interest. But Lewis and Nemirow devised it specifically to block certain anti-physicalist arguments due to Thomas Nagel (1974, 1986) and Frank Jackson (1982, 1986). Does it?
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  5. Duncan Pritchard (2010). Cognitive Ability and the Extended Cognition Thesis. Synthese 175 (1):133 - 151.score: 24.0
    This paper explores the ramifications of the extended cognition thesis in the philosophy of mind for contemporary epistemology. In particular, it argues that all theories of knowledge need to accommodate the ability intuition that knowledge involves cognitive ability, but that once this requirement is understood correctly there is no reason why one could not have a conception of cognitive ability that was consistent with the extended cognition thesis. There is thus, surprisingly, a straightforward way of developing our (...)
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  6. Bence Nanay (2009). Imagining, Recognizing and Discriminating: Reconsidering the Ability Hypothesis. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 79 (3):699-717.score: 24.0
    According to the Ability Hypothesis, knowing what it is like to have experience E is just having the ability to imagine or recognize or remember having experience E. I examine various versions of the Ability Hypothesis and point out that they all face serious objections. Then I propose a new version that is not vulnerable to these objections: knowing what it is like to experience E is having the ability todiscriminate imagining or having experience E from (...)
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  7. Paul Noordhof (2003). Something Like Ability. Australian Journal of Philosophy 81 (1):21-40.score: 24.0
    One diagnosis of what is wrong with the Knowledge Argument rests on the Ability Hypothesis. This couples an ability analysis of knowing what an experience is like together with a denial that phenomenal propositions exist. I argue against both components. I consider three arguments against the existence of phenomenal propositions and find them wanting. Nevertheless I deny that knowing phenomenal propositions is part of knowing what an experience is like. I provide a hybrid account of knowing what an (...)
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  8. Rik Peels (2013). Does Doxastic Responsibility Entail the Ability to Believe Otherwise? Synthese 190 (17):3651-3669.score: 24.0
    Whether responsibility for actions and omissions requires the ability to do otherwise is an important issue in contemporary philosophy. However, a closely related but distinct issue, namely whether doxastic responsibility requires the ability to believe otherwise, has been largely neglected. This paper fills this remarkable lacuna by providing a defence of the thesis that doxastic responsibility entails the ability to believe otherwise. On the one hand, it is argued that the fact that unavoidability is normally an excuse (...)
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  9. Thomas Ågotnes & Dirk Walther (2009). A Logic of Strategic Ability Under Bounded Memory. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 18 (1):55-77.score: 24.0
    We study the logic of strategic ability of coalitions of agents with bounded memory by introducing Alternating-time Temporal Logic with Bounded Memory (ATLBM), a variant of Alternating-time Temporal Logic (ATL). ATLBM accounts for two main consequences of the assumption that agents have bounded memory. First, an agent can only remember a strategy that specifies actions in a bounded number of different circumstances. While the ATL-formula means that coalition C has a joint strategy which will make φ true forever, the (...)
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  10. Christopher Evan Franklin (forthcoming). Everyone Thinks That an Ability to Do Otherwise is Necessary for Free Will and Moral Responsibility. Philosophical Studies:1-17.score: 24.0
    Seemingly one of the most prominent issues that divide theorists about free will and moral responsibility concerns whether the ability to do otherwise is necessary for freedom and responsibility. I defend two claims in this paper. First, that this appearance is illusory: everyone thinks an ability to do otherwise is necessary for freedom and responsibility. The central issue is not whether the ability to do otherwise is necessary for freedom and responsibility but which abilities to do otherwise (...)
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  11. Guido Berens, Cees B. M. van Riel & Johan van Rekom (2007). The CSR-Quality Trade-Off: When Can Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Ability Compensate Each Other? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 74 (3):233 - 252.score: 24.0
    This paper investigates under what conditions a good corporate social responsibility (CSR) can compensate for a relatively poor corporate ability (CA) (quality), and vice versa. The authors conducted an experiment among business administration students, in which information about a financial services company’s CA and CSR was provided. Participants indicated their preferences for the company’s products, stocks, and jobs. The results show that for stock and job preferences, a poor CA can be compensated by a good CSR. For product preferences, (...)
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  12. Eric Vogelstein (2014). Competence and Ability. Bioethics 28 (5):235-244.score: 24.0
    It is nearly universally thought that the kind of decision-making competence that gives one a strong prima facie right to make one's own medical decisions essentially involves having an ability (or abilities) of some sort, or having a certain level or degree of ability (or abilities). When put under philosophical scrutiny, however, this kind of theory does not hold up. I will argue that being competent does not essentially involve abilities, and I will propose and defend a theory (...)
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  13. Lonnie W. Aarssen (1984). On the Distinction Between Niche and Competitive Ability: Implications for Coexistence Theory. Acta Biotheoretica 33 (2).score: 24.0
    The meaning of niche and competitive ability have long been surrounded by controversy. The reason for this stems from the obscure relationship that exists between these terms. This extends from the views of Darwin through Eltonian tradition to current views in which the meaning of competitive ability is implicitly infused into the paradigm of niche. Distinct operational definitions for niche and competitive ability are therefore established with special reference to plants. It is proposed that potential niche refer (...)
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  14. Chieh-Peng Lin, Shwu-Chuan Chen, Chou-Kang Chiu & Wan-Yu Lee (2011). Understanding Purchase Intention During Product-Harm Crises: Moderating Effects of Perceived Corporate Ability and Corporate Social Responsibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 102 (3):455-471.score: 24.0
    A company’s product-harm crises often lead to negative publicity which substantially affects purchase intention. This study attempts to examine the purchase intention and its antecedents (e.g., perceived negative publicity) during product-harm crises by simultaneously including perceived corporate ability (CA) and corporate social responsibility (CSR) as moderators. In the study’s proposed model, purchase intention is indirectly affected by perceived CA, negative publicity, and CSR via the mediation of trust and affective identification. At the same time, the influences of perceived negative (...)
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  15. Susan Hart (1998). A Sorry Tail: Ability, Pedagogy and Educational Reform. British Journal of Educational Studies 46 (2):153 - 168.score: 24.0
    This paper argues that if 'reforms' of education designed to raise standards leave unquestioned the notion of fixed differential ability, then they are likely to be self-defeating. It considers alternative ways of formulating knowledge about individual differences reflected both in the literature and in classroom practice, and concludes by making a case for further research to be undertaken to establish frameworks for teaching consistent with an anti-determinist view of individual potential.
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  16. Johan J. Graafland (2003). Distribution of Responsibility, Ability and Competition. Journal of Business Ethics 45 (1-2):133 - 147.score: 24.0
    This paper considers the distribution of responsibility for prevention of negative social or ecological effects of production and consumption. Responsibility is related to ability and ability depends on welfare. An increase in competition between Western companies depresses their profitability, but increases the welfare of Western consumers and,hence, their ability to acknowledge social values. Therefore, an increase in competition on consumer markets shifts the balance in responsibility from companies to consumers to prevent negative external effects from production and (...)
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  17. Gregor Wolbring & Natalie Ball (2012). Nanoscale Science and Technology and People with Disabilities in Asia: An Ability Expectation Analysis. [REVIEW] NanoEthics 6 (2):127-135.score: 24.0
    Science and technology, including nanoscale science and technology, influences and is influenced by various discourses and areas of action. Ableism is one concept and ability expectation is one dynamic that impacts the direction, vision, and application of nanoscale science and technology and vice versa. At the same time, policy documents that involve or relate to disabled people exhibit ability expectations of disabled people. The authors present ability expectations exhibited within two science and technology direction documents from Asia, (...)
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  18. Beatrice Gelder (1988). Above Suspicion: Cognitive and Intentional Aspects of the Ability to Lie. [REVIEW] Argumentation 2 (1):77-87.score: 24.0
    This paper looks at the attribution of the ability to lie and not at lying or lies. It also departs from more familiar approaches by focussing on the appraisal of an ability and not on the ability in itself. We believe that this attribution perspective is required to bring out the cognitive and intentional basis of the ability to lie.
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  19. Markus Christiner & Susanne Maria Reiterer (2013). Song and Speech: Examining the Link Between Singing Talent and Speech Imitation Ability. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    In previous research on speech imitation, musicality and an ability to sing were isolated as the strongest indicators of good pronunciation skills in foreign languages. We, therefore, wanted to take a closer look at the nature of the ability to sing, which shares a common ground with the ability to imitate speech. This study focuses on whether good singing performance predicts good speech imitation. Fourty-one singers of different levels of proficiency were selected for the study and their (...)
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  20. J. Adam Carter, Benjamin Jarvis & Katherine Rubin (2013). Knowledge and the Value of Cognitive Ability. Synthese 190 (17):3715-3729.score: 22.0
    We challenge a line of thinking at the fore of recent work on epistemic value: the line (suggested by Kvanvig in The value of knowledge and the pursuit of understanding, 2003 and others) that if the value of knowledge is “swamped” by the value of mere true belief, then we have good reason to doubt its theoretical importance in epistemology. We offer a value-driven argument for the theoretical importance of knowledge—one that stands even if the value of knowledge is “swamped” (...)
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  21. Michael Tye (2000). Knowing What It is Like: The Ability Hypothesis and the Knowledge Argument. In Gerhard Preyer (ed.), Consciousness, Color, and Content. MIT Press. 223.score: 21.0
  22. Justin Capes (2012). Action, Responsibility and the Ability to Do Otherwise. Philosophical Studies 158 (1):1-15.score: 21.0
    Here it is argued that in order for something someone “does” to count as a genuine action, the person needn’t have been able to refrain from doing it. If this is right, then two recent defenses of the principle of alternative possibilities, a version of which says that a person is morally responsible for what he has done only if he could have refrained from doing it, are unsuccessful.
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  23. Peter van Inwagen (1978). Ability and Responsibility. Philosophical Review 87 (April):201-24.score: 21.0
  24. Paul H. Benson (1987). Ordinary Ability and Free Action. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 17 (June):307-335.score: 21.0
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  25. E. O. Bregman, E. L. Thorndike & E. Woodyard (1943). The Retention of the Ability to Draw Lines of a Given Length Blindfold. Journal of Experimental Psychology 33 (1):78.score: 21.0
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  26. S. W. Calhoon (1934). Influence of Length of Lists Upon Ability Immediately to Reproduce Disconnected Word-Series Auditorially Presented. Journal of Experimental Psychology 17 (5):723.score: 21.0
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  27. Edwin A. Fleishman (1958). A Relationship Between Incentive Motivation and Ability Level in Psychomotor Performance. Journal of Experimental Psychology 56 (1):78.score: 21.0
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  28. Charles E. Rice, Stephen H. Feinstein & Ronald J. Schusterman (1965). Echo-Detection Ability of the Blind: Size and Distance Factors. Journal of Experimental Psychology 70 (3):246.score: 21.0
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  29. Julia A. Carlson (1966). Effect of Instructions and Perspective-Drawing Ability on Perceptual Constancies and Geometrical Illusions. Journal of Experimental Psychology 72 (6):874.score: 21.0
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  30. Mary J. Kientzle (1949). Ability Patterns Under Distributed Practice. Journal of Experimental Psychology 39 (4):532.score: 21.0
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  31. Sora Kim (forthcoming). What's Worse in Times of Product-Harm Crisis? Negative Corporate Ability or Negative CSR Reputation? Journal of Business Ethics.score: 21.0
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  32. B. L. Riker (1946). The Ability to Judge Pitch. Journal of Experimental Psychology 36 (4):331.score: 21.0
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  33. David M. Stoff & Morris N. Eagle (1971). The Relationship Among Reported Strategies, Presentation Rate, and Verbal Ability and Their Effects on Free Recall Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 87 (3):423-428.score: 21.0
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  34. Alice Van Krevelen (1951). The Ability to Make Absolute Judgments of Pitch. Journal of Experimental Psychology 42 (3):207.score: 21.0
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  35. J. D. Weinland & W. S. Schlauch (1937). An Examination of the Computing Ability of Mr. Salo Finkelstein. Journal of Experimental Psychology 21 (4):382.score: 21.0
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  36. Camilla Persson Benbow (1988). Sex Differences in Mathematical Reasoning Ability in Intellectually Talented Preadolescents: Their Nature, Effects, and Possible Causes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):169.score: 21.0
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  37. M. Campbell (1936). An Experimental Evaluation of the Significance of Three Factors Involved in Motor Performances for General Motor Ability. Journal of Experimental Psychology 19 (5):612.score: 21.0
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  38. M. Campbell (1936). The Cognitive Aspects of Motor Performances and Their Bearing on General Motor Ability. Journal of Experimental Psychology 19 (3):323.score: 21.0
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  39. H. B. Carlson (1937). Factor Analysis of Memory Ability. Journal of Experimental Psychology 21 (5):477.score: 21.0
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  40. H. Cason & E. B. Cason (1925). Association Tendencies and Learning Ability. Journal of Experimental Psychology 8 (3):167.score: 21.0
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  41. Victor J. Cieutat, Fredric E. Stockwell & Clyde E. Noble (1958). The Interaction of Ability and Amount of Practice with Stimulus and Response Meaningfulness (M, M') in Paired-Associate Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 56 (3):193.score: 21.0
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  42. Mary D. Courtney, Helen E. Edwards, Anne M. Chang, Anthony W. Parker, Kathleen Finlayson, Carolyn Bradbury & Zoë Nielsen (2012). Improved Functional Ability and Independence in Activities of Daily Living for Older Adults at High Risk of Hospital Readmission: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (1):128-134.score: 21.0
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  43. Anne-Marie R. DePape, Aoju Chen, Geoffrey Bc Hall & Laurel J. Trainor (2012). Use of Prosody and Information Structure in High Functioning Adults with Autism in Relation to Language Ability. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 21.0
    Abnormal prosody is a striking feature of the speech of those with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), but previous reports suggest large variability among those with ASD. Here we show that part of this heterogeneity can be explained by level of language functioning. We recorded semi-spontaneous but controlled conversations in adults with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder and measured features related to pitch and duration to determine (1) general use of prosodic features, (2) prosodic use in relation to marking information structure, (...)
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  44. F. A. C. Perrin (1921). An Experimental Study of Motor Ability. Journal of Experimental Psychology 4 (1):24.score: 21.0
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  45. C. Shagass (1946). An Attempt to Correlate the Occipital Alpha Frequency of the Electroencephalogram with Performance on a Mental Ability Test. Journal of Experimental Psychology 36 (1):88.score: 21.0
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  46. Charles D. Spielberger & J. Peter Denny (1963). Visual Recognition Thresholds as a Function of Verbal Ability and Word Frequency. Journal of Experimental Psychology 65 (6):597.score: 21.0
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  47. Charles Bailey (1983). Mixed Ability Grouping: A Philosophical Perspective. Allen & Unwin.score: 21.0
     
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  48. Ding Ji (2012). The Manifestation Range of Innately Good Knowledge and Ability, and the Danger of Separation: On Zhuzi's Question About Understanding Words. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 7 (2):217-243.score: 21.0
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  49. Howard H. Kendler & Joseph H. Kanner (1950). A Further Test of the Ability of Rats to Learn the Location of Food When Motivated by Thirst. Journal of Experimental Psychology 40 (6):762.score: 21.0
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  50. Donald A. Riley, John P. McKee & Raymond W. Hadley (1964). Prediction of Auditory Discrimination Learning and Transposition From Children's Auditory Ordering Ability. Journal of Experimental Psychology 67 (4):324.score: 21.0
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