Search results for 'afterlife' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  40
    Thaddeus Metz (forthcoming). The Meaning of Life and the Afterlife. In Benjamin Matheson & Yujin Nagasawa (eds.), The Palgrave Handbook on the Afterlife. Palgrave Macmillan Ch. 16.
    This chapter critically explores contemporary philosophical understandings of whether meaning in life might depend on the presence or absence of an afterlife. After distinguishing various kinds of afterlife, it focuses most on the potential relevance of an eternal one, and considers at length the extreme but common views amongst philosophers that an eternal afterlife would be either necessary for a meaningful life or, conversely, sufficient for a meaningless one. It concludes by considering the plausibility of a more (...)
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  2. Raymond D. Bradley (2015). Can God Condemn One to an Afterlife in Hell? In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case Against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield 441-471.
    This paper argues that God is not logically able to condemn a person to Hell by considering what is entailed by accepting the best argument to the contrary, the so-called free will defense expounded by Christian apologists Alvin Plantinga and William Lane Craig. It argues that the free will defense is logically fallacious, involves a philosophical fiction, and is based on a fraudulent account of Scripture, concluding that the problem of postmortem evil puts would-be believers in a logical and moral (...)
     
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  3. Theodore M. Drange (2015). The Pluralizability Objection to a New-Body Afterlife. In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield 405-408.
    This paper presents and defends that an afterlife in which a person receives a new body after his or her old body is destroyed (as it is on some notions of bodily resurrection) is conceptually impossible. The main idea behind this argument is that such an afterlife would conceptually require that a person be a kind of thing that could be rendered plural. But since persons are not that type of thing, such an afterlife is not conceptually (...)
     
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  4.  14
    Benjamin Matheson (forthcoming). Practical Identity and the Afterlife. In Benjamin Matheson Yujin Nagasawa (ed.), Palgrave Handbook of the Afterlife.
  5.  17
    Jens Johansson (2015). The Importance of a Good Ending: Some Reflections on Samuel Scheffler’s Death and the Afterlife. Journal of Ethics 19 (2):185-195.
    In his recent book, Death and the Afterlife, Samuel Scheffler argues that it matters greatly to us that there be other human beings long after our own deaths. In support of this “Afterlife Thesis,” as I call it, he provides a thought experiment—the “doomsday scenario”—in which we learn that, although we ourselves will live a normal life span, 30 days after our death the earth will be completely destroyed. In this paper I question this “doomsday scenario” (...)
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  6. K. Mitch Hodge (2011). On Imagining the Afterlife. Journal of Cognition and Culture 11 (3-4):367-389.
    The author argues for three interconnected theses which provide a cognitive account for why humans intuitively believe that others survive death. The first thesis, from which the second and third theses follow, is that the acceptance of afterlife beliefs is predisposed by a specific, and already well-documented, imaginative process - the offline social reasoning process. The second thesis is that afterlife beliefs are social in nature. The third thesis is that the living imagine the deceased as socially embodied (...)
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  7.  4
    Andrew Eshleman (forthcoming). The Afterlife: Beyond Belief. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-21.
    When a Christian refers to the future full realization of the kingdom of God in an afterlife, it is typically assumed that she is expressing beliefs about the existence and activity of God in conjunction with supernatural beliefs about an otherworldly realm and the possibility of one’s personal survival after bodily death. In other words, the religious language is interpreted in a realist fashion and the religious person here is construed as a religious believer. A corollary of this widely-held (...)
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  8.  64
    K. Mitch Hodge (2008). Descartes Mistake: How Afterlife Beliefs Challenge the Assumption That Humans Are Intuitive Cartesian Dualists. Journal of Cognition and Culture 8 (3-4):387-415.
    This article presents arguments and evidence that run counter to the widespread assumption among scholars that humans are intuitive Cartesian substance dualists. With regard to afterlife beliefs, the hypothesis of Cartesian substance dualism as the intuitive folk position fails to have the explanatory power with which its proponents endow it. It is argued that the embedded corollary assumptions of the intuitive Cartesian substance dualist position (that the mind and body are different substances, that the mind and soul are intensionally (...)
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  9.  37
    K. Mitch Hodge (2011). Why Immortality Alone Will Not Get Me to the Afterlife. Philosophical Psychology 24 (3):395-410.
    Recent research in the cognitive science of religion suggests that humans intuitively believe that others survive death. In response to this finding, three cognitive theories have been offered to explain this: the simulation constraint theory (Bering, 2002); the imaginative obstacle theory (Nichols, 2007); and terror management theory (Pyszczynski, Rothschild, & Abdollahi, 2008). First, I provide a critical analysis of each of these theories. Second, I argue that these theories, while perhaps explaining why one would believe in his own personal immortality, (...)
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  10.  23
    Judith Bek & Suzanne Lock (2011). Afterlife Beliefs: Category Specificity and Sensitivity to Biological Priming. Religion, Brain and Behavior 1 (1):5-17.
    Adults have been shown to attribute certain properties more frequently than others to the dead. This category-specific pattern has been interpreted in terms of simulation constraints, whereby it may be harder to imagine the absence of some states than others. Afterlife beliefs have also shown context-sensitivity, suggesting that environmental exposure to different types of information might influence adults? reasoning about post-death states. We sought to clarify category and context effects in adults afterlife reasoning. Participants read a story describing (...)
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  11.  74
    WIlliam Hasker, Afterlife. The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Human beings, like all other organic creatures, die and their bodies decay. Nevertheless, there is a widespread and long-standing belief that in some way death is survivable, that there is “life after death.” The focus in this article is on the possibility that the individual who dies will somehow continue to live, or will resume life at a later time, and not on the specific forms such an afterlife might take. We begin by considering the logical possibility of survival, (...)
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  12.  3
    J. S. Blumenthal-Barby (forthcoming). What Sort of Collective Afterlife Matters and How. Philosophia:1-14.
    In Death and the Afterlife, Samuel Scheffler argues that the assumption of a “collective afterlife” plays an essential role in us valuing much of what we do. If a collective afterlife did not exist, our value structures would be radically different according to Scheffler. We would cease to value much of what we do. In Part I of the paper, I argue that there is something to Scheffler’s afterlife conjecture, but that Scheffler has misplaced the mattering (...)
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  13.  2
    Thomas M. Ward (2015). Transhumanization, Personal Identity, and the Afterlife: Thomistic Reflections on a Dantean Theme. New Blackfriars 96 (1065):564-575.
    Taking Aquinas's metaphysics of human nature as my point of departure and taking inspiration from Dante's concept of transhumanization, I sketch a metaphysics of the afterlife according to which a human person in the interim phase between death and resurrection is not a mere disembodied soul. I offer some theological reasons for thinking that our bodily human nature is essential to what we are and for thinking that we can survive the destruction of our bodies at death. I argue (...)
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  14. Timothy F. Murphy (2012). The Afterlife of Embryonic Persons: What a Strange Place Heaven Must Be. Reproductive Biomedicine Online 25:684-688.
    Some commentators argue that conception constitutes the onset of human personhood in a metaphysical sense. This threshold is usually invoked as the basis both for protecting zygotes and embryos from exposure to risks of death in clinical research and fertility medicine and for objecting to abortion, but it also has consequences for certain religious perspectives, including Catholicism whose doctrines directly engage questions of personhood and its meanings. Since more human zygotes and embryos are lost than survive to birth, conferral of (...)
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  15.  80
    Steven D. Hales (2001). Evidence and the Afterlife. Philosophia 28 (1-4):335-346.
    Several prominent philosophers, including A.J. Ayer and Derek Parfit, have offered the evidentiary requirements for believing human personality can reincarnate, and hence that Cartesian dualism is true. At least one philosopher, Robert Almeder, has argued that there are actual cases which satisfy these requirements. I argue in this paper that even if we grant the empirical data-a large concession-belief in reincarnation is still unjustified. The problem is that without a theoretical account of the alleged cases of reincarnation, the empirical evidence (...)
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  16.  20
    Simon van Rysewyk, Eben Alexander: ‘Proof of Heaven: A Neurosurgeon’s Journey Into the Afterlife’ (2012) – is Consciousness Cortical?
  17. Theodore M. Drange (2015). Conceptual Problems Confronting a Totally Disembodied Afterlife. In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife. Rowman & Littlefield 329-333.
    This paper presents and defends an argument for the conclusion that a personal afterlife in the absence of any sort of body at all is not conceptually possible. The main idea behind the argument is that there would be no way for the identities of people in a bodiless state to be established, either by others or by themselves. The argument raises a significant challenge to explaining just how someone in a totally disembodied afterlife could ever be identified—a (...)
     
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  18. Steve Stewart-Williams (2015). On the Origin of Afterlife Beliefs by Means of Memetic Selection. In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield
    Somewhere in the mists of the past, we somehow picked up the idea of an afterlife from our culture. So, where did this idea come from in the first place? The problem is not that there aren’t any plausible theories to explain it; the problem is that there are too many. Some claim that the belief in an afterlife is wishful thinking; others that it’s a way of encouraging socially desirable behavior; and others still that it represents ancient (...)
     
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  19.  17
    Samuel Scheffler (2013). Death and the Afterlife. OUP Usa.
    We normally take it for granted that other people will live on after we ourselves have died. Even if we do not believe in a personal afterlife in which we survive our own deaths, we assume that there will be a "collective afterlife" in which humanity survives long after we are gone. Samuel Scheffler maintains that this assumption plays a surprising - indeed astonishing - role in our lives.
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  20. Niko Kolodny (ed.) (2013). Death and the Afterlife. OUP Usa.
    We normally take it for granted that other people will live on after we ourselves have died. Even if we do not believe in a personal afterlife in which we survive our own deaths, we assume that there will be a "collective afterlife" in which humanity survives long after we are gone. Samuel Scheffler maintains that this assumption plays a surprising - indeed astonishing - role in our lives.
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  21.  38
    K. Mitch Hodge (2011). Why Immortality Alone Will Not Get Me to the Afterlife. Philosophical Psychology 24 (3):395 - 410.
    Recent research in the cognitive science of religion suggests that humans intuitively believe that others survive death. In response to this finding, three cognitive theories have been offered to explain this: the simulation constraint theory (Bering, 2002); the imaginative obstacle theory (Nichols, 2007); and terror management theory (Pyszczynski, Rothschild, & Abdollahi, 2008). First, I provide a critical analysis of each of these theories. Second, I argue that these theories, while perhaps explaining why one would believe in his own personal immortality, (...)
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  22.  99
    Michael V. Antony (2006). Simulation Constraints, Afterlife Beliefs, and Common-Sense Dualism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):462-463.
    Simulation constraints cannot help in explaining afterlife beliefs in general because belief in an afterlife is a precondition for running a simulation. Instead, an explanation may be found by examining more deeply our common-sense dualistic conception of the mind or soul.
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  23.  13
    W. Thompson (2002). The Evolution of the Afterlife. Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (8):61-71.
    Even for those who do not believe in a life after death, the idea of the afterlife that a past culture held can serve as a marker in the evolution of human consciousness. Like a demarcation that begins a process of map-making, the description of the time and space of the life after death starts a process of exploring the nature of consciousness and the cultural ideas of individuation that derive from it. World literature is the chronicle of this (...)
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  24.  39
    Philip Robbins & Anthony I. Jack (2006). An Unconstrained Mind: Explaining Belief in the Afterlife. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):484-484.
    Bering contends that belief in the afterlife is explained by the simulation constraint hypothesis: the claim that we cannot imagine what it is like to be dead. This explanation suffers from some difficulties. First, it implies the existence of a corresponding belief in the “beforelife.” Second, a simpler explanation will suffice. Rather than appeal to constraints on our thoughts about death, we suggest that belief in the afterlife can be better explained by the lack of such constraints.
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  25.  4
    Robert Simpson (2008). Avoiding the Afterlife in Theodicy: Victims of Suffering and the Argument From Usefulness. Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 13 (2).
    Contemporary proponents of theodicy generally believe that a theodi­cal reply to the evidential argument from evil must involve some appeal to the afterlife. In Richard Swinburne's writings on theodicy, however, we find two argu­ments that may be offered in opposition to this prevailing view. In this paper, these two arguments - the argument from usefulness and the argument from assumed consent - are explained and evaluated. It is suggested that both of these arguments are rendered ineffective by their failure (...)
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  26.  13
    Edward Jeremy Miller (2006). Warranting Christian Belief in Afterlife. Newman Studies Journal 3 (1):12-22.
    Most people believe in an afterlife, but is such a belief warranted? While Newman did not specifically treat the doctrine of afterlife, his Grammar of Assent furnishes a trajectory that shows that Christians can believe in this doctrine with a warranted assent, precisely because the Church is a warranted belief.
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  27.  5
    Daniel Anlezark (2013). Francis of Assisi: The Life and Afterlife of a Medieval Saint [Book Review]. Australasian Catholic Record, The 90 (4):497.
    Anlezark, Daniel Review of: Francis of Assisi: The life and afterlife of a medieval saint, by Andre Vauchez, trans. Michael F. Cusato,, pp. xv + 398, $45.00.
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  28.  17
    Brian M. Hughes (2006). Natural Selection and Religiosity: Validity Issues in the Empirical Examination of Afterlife Cognitions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):477-478.
    Bering's target article proposes that the tendency to believe in an afterlife emerged (in evolutionary history) in response to selective pressures unique to human societies. However, the empirical evidence presented fails to account for the broader social context that impinges upon researcher–participant interactions, and so fails to displace the more parsimonious explanation that it is childhood credulity that underlies the acquisition of afterlife beliefs through cultural exposure.
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  29.  3
    Roger W. H. Savage (2004). Social Werktreue and the Musical Work's Independent Afterlife. The European Legacy 9 (4):515-524.
    New musicology's rejection of formalist precepts eclipses how the subjectivization of aesthetics institutes the schema of music's opposition to reality. Social Werktreue?fidelity to the work and to the faithful reproduction of an original intent?replaces ideals of aesthetic transcendence with analyses of a work's socially constructed meaning. Hence, absolute music's social demystification positions music criticism within a system of oppositions ratified by bourgeois culture. The power individual works exercise in contesting reality deconstructs formalist dogma and social Werktreue. The temporality evinced when (...)
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  30. Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.) (2015). The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case Against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield.
    Because every single one of us will die, most of us would like to know what—if anything—awaits us afterward, not to mention the fate of lost loved ones. Given the nearly universal vested interest we personally have in deciding this question in favor of an afterlife, it is no surprise that the vast majority of books on the topic affirm the reality of life after death without a backward glance. But the evidence of our senses and the ever-gaining strength (...)
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  31.  6
    Carl B. Becker (1993). Breaking the Circle: Death and the Afterlife in Buddhism. Southern Illinois University Press.
    In this much-needed examination of Buddhist views of death and the afterlife, Carl B. Becker bridges the gap between books on death in the West and books on Buddhism in the East.
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  32. Jan N. Bremmer (2001). The Rise and Fall of the Afterlife. Routledge.
    Belief in the afterlife is still very much alive in Western civilisation, even though the truth of its existence is no longer universally accepted. Surprisingly, however, heaven, hell and the immortal soul were all ideas which arrived relatively late in the ancient world. Originally Greece and Israel - the cultures that gave us Christianity - had only the vaguest ideas of an afterlife. So where did these concepts come from and why did they develop? In this fascinating, learned, (...)
     
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  33. Jan N. Bremmer (2003). The Rise and Fall of the Afterlife. Routledge.
    Belief in the afterlife is still very much alive in Western civilisation, even though the truth of its existence is no longer universally accepted. Surprisingly, however, heaven, hell and the immortal soul were all ideas which arrived relatively late in the ancient world. Originally Greece and Israel - the cultures that gave us Christianity - had only the vaguest ideas of an afterlife. So where did these concepts come from and why did they develop? In this fascinating, learned, (...)
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  34. Greg Garrett (2015). Entertaining Judgment: The Afterlife in Popular Imagination. Oxford University Press Usa.
    Nowadays references to the afterlife-angels strumming harps, demons brandishing pitchforks, God enthroned on heavenly clouds-are more often encountered in New Yorker cartoons than in serious Christian theological reflection. Speculation about death and its sequel seems to embarrass many theologians; however, as Greg Garrett shows in Entertaining Judgment, popular culture in the U.S. has found rich ground for creative expression in the search for answers to the question: What lies in store for us after we die?The lyrics of Madonna, Los (...)
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  35. Tyron Goldschmidt & Aaron Segal (forthcoming). The Afterlife in Judaism. In Benjamin Matheson & Yujin Nagasawa (eds.), The Palgrave Handbook on the Afterlife. Palgrave Macmillan
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  36. Brett Bowles (2002). Vichy's Afterlife: History and Counterhistory in Postwar France, And: The Papon Affair: Memory and Justice on Trial (Review). Substance 31 (1):125-128.
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  37. John Shand (2011). How Believing in an AFTERLIFE Can RUIN Your Life. Philosophy Now 84:21-21.
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  38.  82
    Nancy C. Lee (forthcoming). Book Review: Surviving Lamentations: Catastrophe, Lament, and Protest in the Afterlife of a Biblical Book. [REVIEW] Interpretation 55 (3):315-316.
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  39.  85
    Dale C. Allison (forthcoming). Book Review: Death and the Afterlife In the New Testament. [REVIEW] Interpretation 62 (1):103-103.
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  40.  22
    Berel Dov Lerner (2015). Samuel Scheffler and Nikko Kolodny, Ed., Death and the Afterlife. Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 35 (3):174-175.
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  41.  31
    Joseph Fins & Nicholas D. Schiff (2005). The Afterlife of Terri Schiavo. Hastings Center Report 35 (4):8-8.
  42.  2
    Carlos Lévy (2010). The Sceptical Academy: Decline and Afterlife. In Richard Arnot Home Bett (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Scepticism. Cambridge University Press 81.
  43. Steven Hales (2001). "Evidence and the Afterlife" Several Prominent Philosophers, Including A.J. Ayer and Derek Parfit, Have. Philosophia 28 (1-4):335-346.
    vol. 28, nos. 1-4, 2001 empirical data-a large concession-belief in reincarnation is still unjustified.
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  44.  26
    James Stacey Taylor (2014). Death and the Afterlife By Samuel Scheffler, Edited by Niko Kolodny. Analysis 74 (4):738-740.
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  45.  6
    Sarah Stroud (2015). Scheffler, Samuel. Death and the Afterlife. [REVIEW] Ethics 125 (2):605-610.
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  46.  63
    Charles B. Daniels (1992). The Afterlife Myth in Plato's Gorgias. Journal of Value Inquiry 26 (2):271-279.
  47.  11
    Victoria Kahn (2010). Machiavelli's Afterlife and Reputation to the Eighteenth Century. In John M. Najemy (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Machiavelli. Cambridge University Press 1--239.
  48.  6
    C. Agulanna (2011). Eschatological Thinking and the Notion of the Afterlife in African Thought System. Sophia: An African Journal of Philosophy 11 (1).
  49.  56
    Pascal Boyer (2006). Prosocial Aspects of Afterlife Beliefs: Maybe Another by-Product. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):466-466.
    Bering argues that belief in posthumous intentional agency may confer added fitness via the inhibition of opportunistic behavior. This is true only if these agents are interested parties in our moral choices, a feature which does not result from Bering's imaginative constraint hypothesis and extends to supernatural agents other than dead people's souls. A by-product model might handle this better.
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  50.  56
    Max Pensky (2004). Natural History: The Life and Afterlife of a Concept in Adorno. Critical Horizons 5 (1):227-258.
    Theodor Adorno's concept of 'natural history' [Naturgeschichte] was central for a number of Adorno's theoretical projects, but remains elusive. In this essay, I analyse different dimensions of the concept of natural history, distinguishing amongst (a) a reflection on the normative and methodological bases of philosophical anthropology and critical social science; (b) a conception of critical memory oriented toward the preservation of the memory of historical suffering; and (c) the notion of 'mindfulness of nature in the subject' provocatively asserted in Max (...)
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