Search results for 'afterlife' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Thaddeus Metz (forthcoming). The Meaning of Life and the Afterlife. In Benjamin Matheson & Yujin Nagasawa (eds.), The Palgrave Handbook on the Afterlife. Palgrave Macmillan. Ch. 16.score: 27.0
    A critical discussion of key positions pertaining to the relationship between an afterlife and what would make a life meaningful, aimed at upper level undergraduates and above.
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  2. WIlliam Hasker, Afterlife. The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 24.0
    Human beings, like all other organic creatures, die and their bodies decay. Nevertheless, there is a widespread and long-standing belief that in some way death is survivable, that there is “life after death.” The focus in this article is on the possibility that the individual who dies will somehow continue to live, or will resume life at a later time, and not on the specific forms such an afterlife might take. We begin by considering the logical possibility of survival, (...)
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  3. K. Mitch Hodge (2008). Descartes Mistake: How Afterlife Beliefs Challenge the Assumption That Humans Are Intuitive Cartesian Dualists. Journal of Cognition and Culture 8 (3-4):387-415.score: 24.0
    This article presents arguments and evidence that run counter to the widespread assumption among scholars that humans are intuitive Cartesian substance dualists. With regard to afterlife beliefs, the hypothesis of Cartesian substance dualism as the intuitive folk position fails to have the explanatory power with which its proponents endow it. It is argued that the embedded corollary assumptions of the intuitive Cartesian substance dualist position (that the mind and body are different substances, that the mind and soul are intensionally (...)
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  4. K. Mitch Hodge (2011). Why Immortality Alone Will Not Get Me to the Afterlife. Philosophical Psychology 24 (3):395-410.score: 24.0
    Recent research in the cognitive science of religion suggests that humans intuitively believe that others survive death. In response to this finding, three cognitive theories have been offered to explain this: the simulation constraint theory (Bering, 2002); the imaginative obstacle theory (Nichols, 2007); and terror management theory (Pyszczynski, Rothschild, & Abdollahi, 2008). First, I provide a critical analysis of each of these theories. Second, I argue that these theories, while perhaps explaining why one would believe in his own personal immortality, (...)
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  5. K. Mitch Hodge (2011). On Imagining the Afterlife. Journal of Cognition and Culture 11 (3-4):367-389.score: 24.0
    The author argues for three interconnected theses which provide a cognitive account for why humans intuitively believe that others survive death. The first thesis, from which the second and third theses follow, is that the acceptance of afterlife beliefs is predisposed by a specific, and already well-documented, imaginative process - the offline social reasoning process. The second thesis is that afterlife beliefs are social in nature. The third thesis is that the living imagine the deceased as socially embodied (...)
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  6. Judith Bek & Suzanne Lock (2011). Afterlife Beliefs: Category Specificity and Sensitivity to Biological Priming. Religion, Brain and Behavior 1 (1):5-17.score: 24.0
    Adults have been shown to attribute certain properties more frequently than others to the dead. This category-specific pattern has been interpreted in terms of simulation constraints, whereby it may be harder to imagine the absence of some states than others. Afterlife beliefs have also shown context-sensitivity, suggesting that environmental exposure to different types of information might influence adults? reasoning about post-death states. We sought to clarify category and context effects in adults afterlife reasoning. Participants read a story describing (...)
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  7. Timothy Murphy (2012). The Afterlife of Embryonic Persons: What a Strange Place Heaven Must Be. Reproductive Biomedicine Online 25:684-688.score: 24.0
    Some commentators argue that conception constitutes the onset of human personhood in a metaphysical sense. This threshold is usually invoked as the basis both for protecting zygotes and embryos from exposure to risks of death in clinical research and fertility medicine and for objecting to abortion, but it also has consequences for certain religious perspectives, including Catholicism whose doctrines directly engage questions of personhood and its meanings. Since more human zygotes and embryos are lost than survive to birth, conferral of (...)
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  8. Steven D. Hales (2001). Evidence and the Afterlife. Philosophia 28 (1-4):335-346.score: 21.0
    Several prominent philosophers, including A.J. Ayer and Derek Parfit, have offered the evidentiary requirements for believing human personality can reincarnate, and hence that Cartesian dualism is true. At least one philosopher, Robert Almeder, has argued that there are actual cases which satisfy these requirements. I argue in this paper that even if we grant the empirical data-a large concession-belief in reincarnation is still unjustified. The problem is that without a theoretical account of the alleged cases of reincarnation, the empirical evidence (...)
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  9. Simon van Rysewyk, Eben Alexander: ‘Proof of Heaven: A Neurosurgeon’s Journey Into the Afterlife’ (2012) – is Consciousness Cortical?score: 21.0
  10. Michael V. Antony (2006). Simulation Constraints, Afterlife Beliefs, and Common-Sense Dualism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):462-463.score: 18.0
    Simulation constraints cannot help in explaining afterlife beliefs in general because belief in an afterlife is a precondition for running a simulation. Instead, an explanation may be found by examining more deeply our common-sense dualistic conception of the mind or soul.
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  11. Philip Robbins & Anthony I. Jack (2006). An Unconstrained Mind: Explaining Belief in the Afterlife. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):484-484.score: 18.0
    Bering contends that belief in the afterlife is explained by the simulation constraint hypothesis: the claim that we cannot imagine what it is like to be dead. This explanation suffers from some difficulties. First, it implies the existence of a corresponding belief in the “beforelife.” Second, a simpler explanation will suffice. Rather than appeal to constraints on our thoughts about death, we suggest that belief in the afterlife can be better explained by the lack of such constraints.
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  12. Brian M. Hughes (2006). Natural Selection and Religiosity: Validity Issues in the Empirical Examination of Afterlife Cognitions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):477-478.score: 18.0
    Bering's target article proposes that the tendency to believe in an afterlife emerged (in evolutionary history) in response to selective pressures unique to human societies. However, the empirical evidence presented fails to account for the broader social context that impinges upon researcher–participant interactions, and so fails to displace the more parsimonious explanation that it is childhood credulity that underlies the acquisition of afterlife beliefs through cultural exposure.
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  13. Samuel Scheffler (2013). Death and the Afterlife. Oup Usa.score: 18.0
    We normally take it for granted that other people will live on after we ourselves have died. Even if we do not believe in a personal afterlife in which we survive our own deaths, we assume that there will be a "collective afterlife" in which humanity survives long after we are gone. Samuel Scheffler maintains that this assumption plays a surprising - indeed astonishing - role in our lives.
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  14. Edward Jeremy Miller (2006). Warranting Christian Belief in Afterlife. Newman Studies Journal 3 (1):12-22.score: 18.0
    Most people believe in an afterlife, but is such a belief warranted? While Newman did not specifically treat the doctrine of afterlife, his Grammar of Assent furnishes a trajectory that shows that Christians can believe in this doctrine with a warranted assent, precisely because the Church is a warranted belief.
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  15. Daniel Anlezark (2013). Francis of Assisi: The Life and Afterlife of a Medieval Saint [Book Review]. Australasian Catholic Record, The 90 (4):497.score: 18.0
    Anlezark, Daniel Review of: Francis of Assisi: The life and afterlife of a medieval saint, by Andre Vauchez, trans. Michael F. Cusato, , pp. xv + 398, $45.00.
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  16. Roger W. H. Savage (2004). Social Werktreue and the Musical Work's Independent Afterlife. The European Legacy 9 (4):515-524.score: 18.0
    New musicology's rejection of formalist precepts eclipses how the subjectivization of aesthetics institutes the schema of music's opposition to reality. Social Werktreue?fidelity to the work and to the faithful reproduction of an original intent?replaces ideals of aesthetic transcendence with analyses of a work's socially constructed meaning. Hence, absolute music's social demystification positions music criticism within a system of oppositions ratified by bourgeois culture. The power individual works exercise in contesting reality deconstructs formalist dogma and social Werktreue. The temporality evinced when (...)
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  17. Jan N. Bremmer (2001). The Rise and Fall of the Afterlife. Routledge.score: 18.0
    Belief in the afterlife is still very much alive in Western civilisation, even though the truth of its existence is no longer universally accepted. Surprisingly, however, heaven, hell and the immortal soul were all ideas which arrived relatively late in the ancient world. Originally Greece and Israel - the cultures that gave us Christianity - had only the vaguest ideas of an afterlife. So where did these concepts come from and why did they develop? In this fascinating, learned, (...)
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  18. Steven Hales (2001). &Quot;evidence and the Afterlife" Several Prominent Philosophers, Including A.J. Ayer and Derek Parfit, Have. Philosophia 28 (1-4):335-346.score: 15.0
    vol. 28, nos. 1-4, 2001 empirical data-a large concession-belief in reincarnation is still unjustified.
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  19. Charles B. Daniels (1992). The Afterlife Myth in Plato's Gorgias. Journal of Value Inquiry 26 (2):271-279.score: 15.0
  20. David J. Darling (1995). Soul Search: A Scientist Explores the Afterlife. Villard Books.score: 15.0
    Soul Search lifts the shroud that has, until now, blindfolded us to the discovery that soul and mortality lie at the very heart of the universe.
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  21. Eyal Chowers (1998). Time in Zionism: The Life and Afterlife of a Temporal Revolution. Political Theory 26 (5):652-685.score: 15.0
  22. Max Pensky (2004). Natural History: The Life and Afterlife of a Concept in Adorno. Critical Horizons 5 (1):227-258.score: 15.0
    Theodor Adorno's concept of 'natural history' [Naturgeschichte] was central for a number of Adorno's theoretical projects, but remains elusive. In this essay, I analyse different dimensions of the concept of natural history, distinguishing amongst (a) a reflection on the normative and methodological bases of philosophical anthropology and critical social science; (b) a conception of critical memory oriented toward the preservation of the memory of historical suffering; and (c) the notion of 'mindfulness of nature in the subject' provocatively asserted in Max (...)
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  23. Victor J. Stenger, Is There Evidence for an Afterlife?score: 15.0
    D’Souza claims that near-death experiences (NDE) suggest that consciousness can outlive the breakdown of the body and cannot be explained as the product of dying brains. These experiences can be found in situations where a subject is not near death and have all the characteristics of hallucinations caused by oxygen deprivation. Despite thousands of cases, no one has every come back from an NDE with information that could not have been in their heads originally.
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  24. Pascal Boyer (2006). Prosocial Aspects of Afterlife Beliefs: Maybe Another by-Product. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):466-466.score: 15.0
    Bering argues that belief in posthumous intentional agency may confer added fitness via the inhibition of opportunistic behavior. This is true only if these agents are interested parties in our moral choices, a feature which does not result from Bering's imaginative constraint hypothesis and extends to supernatural agents other than dead people's souls. A by-product model might handle this better.
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  25. David Estes (2006). Evidence for Early Dualism and a More Direct Path to Afterlife Beliefs. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):470-+.score: 15.0
    Ample evidence for dualism in early childhood already exists. Young children have explicit knowledge of the distinction between mental and physical phenomena, which provides the foundation for a rapidly developing theory of mind. Belief in psychological immortality might then follow naturally from this mentalistic conception of human existence and thus require no organized cognitive system dedicated to producing it.
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  26. Alexandra von Lieven (2010). The Afterlife (M.) Smith Traversing Eternity. Texts for the Afterlife From Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt. Pp. Xx + 725, Maps, Pls. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009. Cased, £125. ISBN: 978-0-19-815464-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 60 (02):509-511.score: 15.0
  27. Stephen R. L. Clark (1983). Waking-Up: A Neglected Model for the Afterlife. Inquiry 26 (2):209 – 230.score: 15.0
    An inquiry into the possibility that life?after?death be understood as waking from a shared dream into the real world. Attempts to outlaw the possibility that ?really? we are, e.g., vat?brains are shown to lead to unwelcome, anti?realist conclusions about either the world or consciousness. The unsatisfactory nature of empirically observable (Humean) causal connections suggests that real causes may be found beyond the world of our present experience. Though such a story cannot now be proved to be true, we are entitled (...)
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  28. Joseph Fins & Nicholas D. Schiff (2005). The Afterlife of Terri Schiavo. Hastings Center Report 35 (4):8-8.score: 15.0
  29. John Shand (2011). How Believing in an AFTERLIFE Can RUIN Your Life. Philosophy Now 84:21-21.score: 15.0
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  30. George E. Newman, Sergey V. Blok & Lance J. Rips (2006). Beliefs in Afterlife as a by-Product of Persistence Judgments. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):480-481.score: 15.0
    We agree that supernatural beliefs are pervasive. However, we propose a more general account rooted in how people trace ordinary objects over time. Tracking identity involves attending to the causal history of an object, a process that may implicate hidden mechanisms. We discuss experiments in which participants exhibit the same “supernatural” beliefs when reasoning about the fates of cups and automobiles as those exhibited by Bering's participants when reasoning about spirits.
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  31. D. P. Walker (1964). Eternity and the Afterlife. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 27:241-250.score: 15.0
  32. Alan Carter (1999). Animal Life and Afterlife. Cogito 13 (1):27-31.score: 15.0
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  33. James Stacey Taylor (2014). Death and the Afterlife By Samuel Scheffler, Edited by Niko Kolodny. Analysis 74 (4):738-740.score: 15.0
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  34. Ivor A. Stodolsky (2011). A 'Non-Aligned' Intelligentsia: Timur Novikov's Neo-Avantgarde and the Afterlife of Leningrad Non-Conformism. Studies in East European Thought 63 (2):135-145.score: 15.0
    This article describes a logic of distinction and succession within the late-twentieth-century Leningrad-St. Petersburg cultural field, whereby consecutive intelligentsia mainstreams were replaced by their avant-garde peripheries. In this dynamic picture of socio-cultural transformations, I propose a working hypothesis of a repeated stratification of the field into an ‘official’, an ‘unofficial’, and a third ‘non-aligned’ intelligentsia. This hypothesis is tested in reference to the ‘non-aligned’ groups founded by the avant-garde artist and ideologue Timur Novikov (1958–2002). Three major shifts are described: from (...)
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  35. Maha Elkaisy-Friemuth & John M. Dillon (eds.) (2009). The Afterlife of the Platonic Soul: Reflections of Platonic Psychology in the Monotheistic Religions. Brill.score: 15.0
    This volume of essays presents a selection of studies in the ways in which Platonist psychology is adapted to the needs of thinkers in the three great religious ...
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  36. Laurence M. Eldredge (1999). The English Vernacular Afterlife of Benvenutus Grassus, Ophthalmologist1. Early Science and Medicine 4 (2):149-163.score: 15.0
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  37. Caroline rooney (2004). Reservations Concerning Libido Theory and the Afterlife of Psychoanalysis. Angelaki 9 (1):37 – 52.score: 15.0
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  38. Stuart Elden (2006). Some Are Born Posthumously: The French Afterlife of Henri Lefebvre. Historical Materialism 14 (4):185-202.score: 15.0
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  39. Dale C. Allison (forthcoming). Book Review: Death and the Afterlife In the New Testament. [REVIEW] Interpretation 62 (1):103-103.score: 15.0
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  40. Alison Forsyth (forthcoming). No Longer Lost for Words: Antigone's Afterlife. Colloquy.score: 15.0
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  41. David H. Sick (2003). INTIMATIONS OF IMMORTALITY J. N. Bremmer: The Rise and Fall of the Afterlife. The 1995 Read–Tuckwell Lectures at the University of Bristol . Pp. Xi + 238. London and New York: Routledge, 2001. Paper, £15.99. ISBN: 0-415-14148-6 (0-415-14147-8 Hbk). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 53 (01):210-.score: 15.0
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  42. Bernard C. Dietrich (1997). Death and Afterlife in Minoan Religion. Kernos 10:19-38.score: 15.0
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  43. Peter Heslin (2011). Achilles (J.S.) Burgess The Death and Afterlife of Achilles. Pp. Xviii + 184, Ills. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009. Cased, £24, US$45. ISBN: 978-0-8018-9029-1. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 61 (02):356-357.score: 15.0
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  44. Hélène Perdicoyianni-Paléologou (2002). Inscriptions Through the Ages A. Cooley (Ed.): The Afterlife of Inscriptions. Reusing, Rediscovering, Reinventing and Revitalizing Ancient Inscriptions . Pp. XIII + 203, Ills. London: Institute of Classical Studies, 2000. Paper. Isbn: 0-900587-86-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 52 (02):355-.score: 15.0
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  45. Johann P. Arnason (2000). Approaching Byzantium: Identity, Predicament and Afterlife. Thesis Eleven 62 (1):39-69.score: 15.0
    The attempts to interpret Russian and Southeast European history in light of a Byzantine background tend to focus on traditions of political culture, and to claim that patterns characteristic of the late Roman Empire have had a formative impact on later developments. But the effects attributed to political culture presuppose a civilizational framework, and arguments on that level must come to grips with evidence of historical discontinuity, during the Byzantine millennium as well as in later centuries and on the periphery (...)
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  46. Heather T. Battles (2009). Book Review: Bones and Ochre: The Curious Afterlife of the Red Lady of Paviland. Marianne Sommer. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2007, Xii+ 398 Pp, List of Archives Consulted, 14 Figures, 2 Appendices. [REVIEW] Nexus 21 (1):7.score: 15.0
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  47. Sarah Bolmarcich (2007). The Afterlife of a Treaty1. Classical Quarterly 57 (02).score: 15.0
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  48. Peter Byrne (1992). David A. Pailin. A Gentle Touch: From a Theology of Handicap to a Theology of Being Human. London. S.P.C.K. 1992 X + 192.Robert L. Fastiggi. The Natural Theology of Yves de Paris. Atlanta Ga. Scholars Press. 1992. Pp 281. $19.95 Pbk.Merold Westphal. Hegel, Freedom and Modernity New York. State University Press of New York. 1992. Pp Xviii + 295.Paul Davies. The Mind of God: The Scientific Basis for a Rational World. New York. Simon and Schuster. Pp 245.Hiroshi Obayashi Ed. Death and Afterlife. New York. Greenwood Press. 1992. Pp Xxii + 209.B. M. Marshall. Theology and Dialogue: Essays in Conversation with George Lindbeck. Notre Dame Ind. University of Notre Dame. 1990. Pp 288. $29.95.Raymond I. Weiss. Maimonides' Ethics: The Encounter of Philosophic and Religious Morality. Chicago. University of Chicago Press. 1991. Pp 224. $23.95.David Ross Scully. Alfred North Whitehead: A First Look. New York. Vantage Press. 1991. Pp 96.Daniel A. Dombrowski. St John of the Cross: An Appreciation. Alb. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 28 (4):583.score: 15.0
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  49. Joshua A. Fogel (2012). 2011 Arthur O. Lovejoy Lecture: The Gold Seal of 57 CE and the Afterlife of an Inanimate Object. Journal of the History of Ideas 73 (3):351-369.score: 15.0
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