Search results for 'amnesia' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John P. Aggleton & Malcolm W. Brown (1999). Episodic Memory, Amnesia, and the Hippocampal–Anterior Thalamic Axis. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):425-444.score: 24.0
    By utilizing new information from both clinical and experimental (lesion, electrophysiological, and gene-activation) studies with animals, the anatomy underlying anterograde amnesia has been reformulated. The distinction between temporal lobe and diencephalic amnesia is of limited value in that a common feature of anterograde amnesia is damage to part of an comprising the hippocampus, the fornix, the mamillary bodies, and the anterior thalamic nuclei. This view, which can be traced back to Delay and Brion (1969), differs from other (...)
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  2. Kathy Behrendt (2010). Scraping Down the Past: Memory and Amnesia in W. G. Sebald's Anti-Narrative. Philosophy and Literature 34 (2):394-408.score: 24.0
    Vanguard anti-narrativist Galen Strawson declares personal memory unimportant for self-constitution. But what if lapses of personal memory are sustained by a morally reprehensible amnesia about historical events, as happens in the work of W.G. Sebald? The importance of memory cannot be downplayed in such cases. Nevertheless, contrary to expectations, a concern for memory needn’t ally one with the narrativist position. Recovery of historical and personal memory results in self-dissolution and not self-unity or understanding in Sebald’s characters. In the end, (...)
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  3. Christoph Hoerl (1999). Memory, Amnesia, and the Past. Mind and Language 14 (2):227-51.score: 24.0
    This paper defends the claim that, in order to have a concept of time, subjects must have memories of particular events they once witnessed. Some patients with severe amnesia arguably still have a concept of time. Two possible explanations of their grasp of this concept are discussed. They take as their respective starting points abilities preserved in the patients in question: (1) the ability to retain factual information over time despite being unable to recall the past event or situation (...)
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  4. and Neal J. Cohen Alex Konkel, David E. Warren, Melissa C. Duff, Daniel N. Tranel (2008). Hippocampal Amnesia Impairs All Manner of Relational Memory. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2:15-15.score: 24.0
    Relational memory theory holds that the hippocampus supports, and amnesia following hippocampal damage impairs, memory for all manner of relations. Unfortunately, many studies of hippocampal-dependent memory have either examined only a single type of relational memory or conflated multiple kinds of relations. The experiments reported here employed a procedure in which each of several kinds of relational memory (spatial, associative, and sequential) could be tested separately using the same materials. In Experiment 1, performance of amnesic patients with medial temporal (...)
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  5. Vanessa Carbonell (2014). Amnesia, Anesthesia, and Warranted Fear. Bioethics 28 (5):245-254.score: 24.0
    Is a painful experience less bad for you if you will not remember it? Do you have less reason to fear it? These questions bear on how we think about medical procedures and surgeries that use an anesthesia regimen that leaves patients conscious – and potentially in pain – but results in complete ‘drug-induced amnesia’ after the fact. I argue that drug-induced amnesia does not render a painful medical procedure a less fitting object of fear, and thus the (...)
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  6. Hans J. Markowitsch Angelica Staniloiu, Sabine Borsutzky, Friedrich G. Woermann (2013). Social Cognition in a Case of Amnesia with Neurodevelopmental Mechanisms. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    Episodic-autobiographical memory (EAM) is considered to emerge gradually in concert with the development of other cognitive abilities. Developmental studies have emphasized socio-cultural-linguistic mechanisms that may be unique to the development of EAM. Furthermore it was hypothesized that one of the main functions of EAM is the social one. In the research field, the link between EAM and social cognition remains however debated. Herein we aim to bring new insights into the relation between EAM and social information processing (including social cognition) (...)
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  7. Angelica Staniloiu & Hans J. Markowitsch (2012). Towards Solving the Riddle of Forgetting in Functional Amnesia: Recent Advances and Current Opinions. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    Remembering the past is a core feature of human beings, enabling them to maintain a sense of wholeness and identity and preparing them for the demands of the future. Forgetting operates in a dynamic neural connection with remembering, allowing the elimination of unnecessary or irrelevant information overload and decreasing interference. Stress and traumatic experiences could affect this connection, resulting in memory disturbances, such as functional amnesia. An overview of clinical, epidemiological, neuropsychological and neurobiological aspects of functional amnesia is (...)
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  8. Hans J. Markowitsch Angelica Staniloiu (2012). Towards Solving the Riddle of Forgetting in Functional Amnesia: Recent Advances and Current Opinions. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    Remembering the past is a core feature of human beings, enabling them to maintain a sense of wholeness and identity and preparing them for the demands of the future. Forgetting operates in a dynamic neural connection with remembering, allowing the elimination of unnecessary or irrelevant information overload and decreasing interference. Stress and traumatic experiences could affect this connection, resulting in memory disturbances, such as functional amnesia. An overview of clinical, epidemiological, neuropsychological and neurobiological aspects of functional amnesia is (...)
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  9. Klemens Gutbrod, Claudine Krouzel, Helene Hofer, René Müri, Walter J. Perrig & Radek Ptak (2006). Decision-Making in Amnesia: Do Advantageous Decisions Require Conscious Knowledge of Previous Behavioural Choices? Neuropsychologia 44 (8):1315-1324.score: 21.0
  10. Suparna Rajaram, Maryellen Hamilton & Anthony Bolton (2002). Distinguishing States of Awareness From Confidence During Retrieval: Evidence From Amnesia. Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience 2 (3):227-235.score: 21.0
  11. M. E. Bitterman & F. L. Marcuse (1945). Autonomic Response in Posthypnotic Amnesia. Journal of Experimental Psychology 35 (3):248.score: 21.0
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  12. Nicholas P. Spanos (1986). Hypnotic Behavior: A Social-Psychological Interpretation of Amnesia, Analgesia, and “Trance Logic”. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):449.score: 21.0
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  13. Douglas K. Detterman & Norman R. Ellis (1972). Determinants of Induced Amnesia in Short-Term Memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology 95 (2):308.score: 21.0
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  14. Giovanna Leone & Mauro Sarrica (2012). When Ownership Hurts: Remembering the in-Group Wrongdoings After a Long Lasting Collective Amnesia. Human Affairs 22 (4):603-612.score: 21.0
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  15. Jaap M. J. Murre, Antonio G. Chessa & Martijn Meeter (2013). A Mathematical Model of Forgetting and Amnesia. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 21.0
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  16. William H. Saufley Jr & Eugene Winograd (1970). Retrograde Amnesia and Priority Instructions in Free Recall. Journal of Experimental Psychology 85 (1):150.score: 21.0
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  17. Kevin T. Kelly (1999). Iterated Belief Revision, Reliability, and Inductive Amnesia. Erkenntnis 50 (1):11-58.score: 18.0
    Belief revision theory concerns methods for reformulating an agent's epistemic state when the agent's beliefs are refuted by new information. The usual guiding principle in the design of such methods is to preserve as much of the agent's epistemic state as possible when the state is revised. Learning theoretic research focuses, instead, on a learning method's reliability or ability to converge to true, informative beliefs over a wide range of possible environments. This paper bridges the two perspectives by assessing the (...)
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  18. Jennifer J. Freyd (1994). Betrayal Trauma: Traumatic Amnesia as an Adaptive Response to Childhood Abuse. Ethics and Behavior 4 (4):307 – 329.score: 18.0
    Betrayal trauma theory suggests that psychogenic amnesia is an adaptive response to childhood abuse. When a parent or other powerful figure violates a fundamental ethic of human relationships, victims may need to remain unaware of the trauma not to reduce suffering but rather to promote survival. Amnesia enables the child to maintain an attachment with a figure vital to survival, development, and thriving. Analysis of evolutionary pressures, mental modules, social cognitions, and developmental needs suggests that the degree to (...)
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  19. R. Joseph (2003). Emotional Trauma and Childhood Amnesia. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (2):151-179.score: 18.0
    It has been reported that, on average, most adults recall first memories formed around age 3.5. In general, most first memories are positive. However, whether these first memories tend to be visual or verbal and whether the period for childhood amnesia (CA) is greater for visual or verbal or for positive versus negative memories has not been determined. Because negative, stressful experiences disrupt memory and can injure memory centers such as the hippocampus and amygdala, and since adults who were (...)
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  20. Jean Curthoys (1997). Feminist Amnesia: The Wake of Women's Liberation. Routledge.score: 18.0
    Feminist Amnesia is an important challenge to contemporary academic feminism. Jean Curthoys argues that the intellectual decline of university arts education and the loss of a deep moral commitment in feminism are related phenomena. The contradiction set up by the radical ideas of the 1960s, and institutionalised life of many of its protagonists in the academy, has produced a special kind of intellectual distortion. This book criticizes current trends in feminist theory from the perspective of forgotten and allegedly outdated (...)
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  21. Rebecca D. Burwell & Howard Eichenbaum (1999). What's New in Animal Models of Amnesia? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):446-447.score: 18.0
    In general, we endorse Aggleton & Brown's thesis that the neuroanatomy of amnesia comprises two functionally distinct systems, but we are disappointed in the lack of detail regarding the critical functional contribution of the hippocampus. We also take issue with the characterization of the cortical areas surrounding the hippocampus, particularly the decreased emphasis on the cortical input to the hippocampus.
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  22. Robert G. Mair, Joshua A. Burk, M. Christine Porter & Jessica E. Ley (1999). Thalamic Amnesia and the Hippocampus: Unresolved Questions and an Alternative Candidate. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):458-459.score: 18.0
    Aggleton & Brown have built a convincing case that hippocampus-related circuits may be involved in thalamic amnesia. It remains to be established, however, that their model represents a distinct neurological system, that the distinction between recall and familiarity captures the roles of these pathways in episodic memory, or that there are no other systems that contribute to the signs of amnesia associated with thalamic disease.
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  23. M. L. Peters, S. A. Uyterlinde, J. Consemulder & O. van der Hart (1998). Apparent Amnesia on Experimental Memory Tests in Dissociative Identity Disorder: An Exploratory Study. Consciousness and Cognition 7 (1):27-41.score: 18.0
    Dissociative identity disorder (DID; called multiple personality disorder in DSMIII-R) is a psychiatric condition in which two or more identity states recurrently take control of the person's behavior. A characteristic feature of DID is the occurrence of apparently severe amnestic symptoms. This paper is concerned with experimental research of memory function in DID and focuses on between-identity transfer of newly learned neutral material. Previous studies on this subject are reviewed and a pilot study with four subjects is described. This study (...)
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  24. Janelle N. Beadle, Daniel Tranel, Neal J. Cohen & Melissa Duff (2013). Empathy in Hippocampal Amnesia. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 18.0
    The scientific investigation of empathy has become a cornerstone in the field of social cognition. Empathy is critical to the quality of our relationships with others and plays an important role in life satisfaction and well-being. Scientific investigations of empathy have focused on characterizing its cognitive and neural substrates, pointing to a network of brain regions involved in emotional experience and perspective taking (e.g., ventromedial prefrontal cortex, amygdala, anterior insula, cingulate). While the hippocampus has rarely been the focus of empathy (...)
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  25. Eric Eich, J. L. Reeves & R. L. Katz (1985). Anesthesia, Amnesia, and the Memory/Awareness Distinction. Anesthesia and Analgesia 64:1143-48.score: 15.0
  26. Geraint Rees, C. Russell, Christopher D. Frith & Julia Driver (1999). Inattentional Blindness Versus Inattentional Amnesia for Fixated but Ignored Words. Science 286 (5449):2504-7.score: 15.0
  27. Angelica Staniloiu, Hans J. Markowitsch & Matthias Brand (2010). Psychogenic Amnesia – A Malady of the Constricted Self☆. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (3):778-801.score: 15.0
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  28. Jeremy Wolfe (1999). Inattentional Amnesia. Journal of Mental Imagery 29 (3-4):71-94.score: 15.0
  29. Daniel L. Schacter (1992). Consciousness and Awareness in Memory and Amnesia: Critical Issues. In A. David Milner & M. D. Rugg (eds.), The Neuropsychology of Consciousness. Academic Press.score: 15.0
  30. David Bzdak (2008). On Amnesia and Knowing-How. Techne 12 (1):36-47.score: 15.0
    In this paper, I argue that Stanley and Williamson’s 2001 account of knowledge-how as a species of knowledge-that is wrong. They argue that a claim such as “Hannah knows how to ride a bicycle” is true if and only if Hannah has some relevant knowledge-that. I challenge their claim by considering the case of a famous amnesic patient named Henry M. who is capable of acquiring and retaining new knowledge-how but who is incapable of acquiring and retaining new knowledge-that. In (...)
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  31. Rafaële J. C. Huntjens, Albert Postma, Liesbeth Woertman, Onno van Der Hart & Madelon L. Peters (2005). Procedural Memory in Dissociative Identity Disorder: When Can Inter-Identity Amnesia Be Truly Established?☆. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (2):377-389.score: 15.0
  32. Jonathan K. Foster (2001). Cantor Coding and Chaotic Itinerancy: Relevance for Episodic Memory, Amnesia, and the Hippocampus? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):815-816.score: 15.0
    This commentary provides a critique of Tsuda's target article, focusing on the hippocampus and episodic long-term memory. More specifically, the relevance of Cantor coding and chaotic itinerancy for long-term memory functioning is considered, given what we know about the involvement of the hippocampus in the mediation of long-term episodic memory (based on empirical neuroimaging studies and investigations of brain-damaged amnesic patients).
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  33. Joseph Lyons (1981). Memory Traces and Infantile Amnesia: A Reconsideration of the Work of Erwin Straus. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 11 (2):147–166.score: 15.0
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  34. Mary R. Harvey & Judith Lewis Herman (1994). Amnesia, Partial Amnesia, and Delayed Recall Among Adult Survivors of Childhood Trauma. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (3-4):295-306.score: 15.0
  35. Nicholas Capaldi (2009). Philosophical Amnesia. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 84 (65):93-.score: 15.0
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  36. Zelia Gregoriou (1999). Letter Writing and the Performativity of Intimacy in Female Pedagogical Relations: Recuperating Derridean Amnesia, Writing Back to Madame de Maintenon. Studies in Philosophy and Education 18 (5):351-363.score: 15.0
    Performativity and performance of language are the subject of this re-writing of Derrida's position on the gift. Here the source of performativity is Althusser's while the source of the gift is not only Marcel Mauss, but also both the opening of Derrida's Given Time: I, Counterfeit Money and the signing through letters of Madame de Maintenon, wife of Louis XIV and founder of a school for girls. A third writing plays a role, that of a 1910 biography of Madame. The (...)
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  37. Irene McMullin (2011). The Amnesia of the Modern: Arendt on the Role of Memory in the Constitution of the Political. Philosophical Topics 39 (2):91-116.score: 15.0
    In this paper I consider the essential role that public memory plays in the establishment and maintenance of the political arena and its space of appearance. Without this space and the shared memory that allows it to appear, Hannah Arendt argues, transience and finitude would consume the excellence of word and deed—just as the "natural ruin of time" consumes its mortal performer. The modern era displays a kind of mnemonic failure, however, a situation arising not only from technological developments that (...)
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  38. William P. Banks (1996). Korsakoff and Amnesia. Consciousness and Cognition 5 (1-2):22-26.score: 15.0
  39. R. D'Amico (1975). A Concept of Subjectivity: Comments on Jacoby's Social Amnesia. Telos 1975 (24):129-134.score: 15.0
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  40. David R. Shanks, Learning Strategies in Amnesia.score: 15.0
    Previous research suggests that early performance of amnesic individuals in a probabilistic category learning task is relatively unimpaired. When combined with impaired declarative knowledge, this is taken as evidence for the existence of separate implicit and explicit memory systems. The present study contains a more fine-grained analysis of learning than earlier studies. Using a dynamic lens model approach with plausible learning models, we found that the learning process is indeed indistinguishable between an amnesic and control group. However, in contrast to (...)
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  41. Julia Fisher, E. Hirshman, T. HenThorn, J. Arndt & A. PAssannante (2006). Midazolam Amnesia and Short-Term/Working Memory Processes. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (1):54-63.score: 15.0
  42. Mary Jo Nissen, James L. Ross, Daniel B. Willingham, Thomas B. Mackenzie & Daniel L. Schacter (1994). Evaluating Amnesia in Multiple Personality Disorder. In R. M. Klein & B. K. Doane (eds.), Psychological concepts and dissociative disorders. Erlbaum Associates.score: 15.0
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  43. Winfred Overholser, D. M., D. Sc, D. H. & D. L. (1961). Guilt and Amnesia Comments on Regina V. Podola. Heythrop Journal 2 (2):99–110.score: 15.0
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  44. Geoffrey Underwood (1986). Using Simulations to Disprove Hypnosis Amnesia? Forget It. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):485.score: 15.0
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  45. W. Glannon (forthcoming). Anaesthesia, Amnesia and Harm. Journal of Medical Ethics.score: 15.0
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  46. John F. Kihlstrom & Frederick J. Evans (1978). Generic Recall During Posthypnotic Amnesia. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 12 (1):57-60.score: 15.0
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  47. Jake Kurczek, Sarah Brown-Schmidt & Melissa Duff (2013). Hippocampal Contributions to Language: Evidence of Referential Processing Deficits in Amnesia. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 142 (4):1346.score: 15.0
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  48. Caleb Henry Smith, David A. Oakley & John Morton (2013). Increased Response Time of Primed Associates Following an “Episodic” Hypnotic Amnesia Suggestion: A Case of Unconscious Volition. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (4):1305-1317.score: 15.0
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  49. JoNell A. Usher & Ulric Neisser (1993). Childhood Amnesia and the Beginnings of Memory for Four Early Life Events. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 122 (2):155.score: 15.0
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  50. J. P. Aggleton, M. W. Brown, J. Bachevalier, J. K. Parkinson, E. C. Warburton, S. Corkin, D. G. Amaral, R. G. Gonzalez, V. Lerner & J. Margolin (2013). Understanding Amnesia–Is It Time to Forget HM? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22:425-466.score: 15.0
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