Search results for 'anarchism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kenneth M. Ehrenberg (2011). The Anarchist Official: A Problem for Legal Positivism. Australian Journal of Legal Philosophy 36:89-112.score: 24.0
    I examine the impact of the presence of anarchists among key legal officials upon the legal positivist theories of H.L.A. Hart and Joseph Raz. For purposes of this paper, an anarchist is one who believes that the law cannot successfully obligate or create reasons for action beyond prudential reasons, such as avoiding sanction. I show that both versions of positivism require key legal officials to endorse the law in some way, and that if a legal system can continue to exist (...)
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  2. Bertrand Russell, Proposed Roads to Freedom: Socialism, Anarchism and Syndicalism.score: 24.0
    What is perhaps most remarkable in regard to both Socialism and Anarchism is the association of a widespread popular movement with ideals for a better world. The ideals have been elaborated, in the first instance, by solitary writers of books, and yet powerful sections of the wage-earning classes have accepted them as their guide in the practical affairs of the world. In regard to Socialism this is evident; but in regard to Anarchism it is only true with some (...)
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  3. Robert Louis Hoffman (ed.) (1970/2010). Anarchism as Political Philosophy. Aldinetransaction.score: 24.0
    Against these are set pieces that argue anarchisms impossibility and estimate its relevance to social change.The debate format of Anarchism introduces the ...
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  4. Chaim Gans (1992). Philosophical Anarchism and Political Disobedience. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    This book examines the central questions concerning the duty to obey the law: the meaning of this duty; whether and where it should be acknowledged; and whether and when it should be disregarded. Many contemporary philosophers deny the very existence of this duty, but take a cautious stance toward political disobedience. This 'toothless anarchism', Professor Gans argues, should be discarded in favour of a converse position confirming the existence of a duty to obey the law which can be outweighed (...)
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  5. Ryan Windeknecht (2012). Law Without Legitimacy or Justification? The Flawed Foundations of Philosophical Anarchism. Res Publica 18 (2):173-188.score: 24.0
    In this article, I examine A. John Simmons’s philosophical anarchism, and specifically, the problems that result from the combination of its three foundational principles: the strong correlativity of legitimacy rights and political obligations; the strict distinction between justified existence and legitimate authority; and the doctrine of personal consent, more precisely, its supporting assumptions about the natural freedom of individuals and the non-natural states into which individuals are born. As I argue, these assumptions, when combined with the strong correlativity and (...)
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  6. Jacob Blumenfeld, Chiara Bottici & Simon Critchley (2013). The Anarchist Turn.score: 24.0
    The concept of anarchy is often presented as a recipe for pure disorder. The Anarchist Turn brings together innovative and fresh perspectives on anarchism to argue that in fact it represents a form of collective, truly democratic social organisation. The book shows how in the last decade the negative caricature of anarchy has begun to crack. Globalisation and the social movements it spawned have proved what anarchists have long been advocating: an anarchical order is not just desirable, but also (...)
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  7. Robert Bass (2005). Book Review: The Debates of Liberty: An Overview of Individualist Anarchism, 1881-1908. By Wendy McElroy. [REVIEW] Journal of Libertarian Studies 19 (3):99-101.score: 22.0
    There was a period in the latter nineteenth century when a distinctively American kind of radicalism flourished, a time when key thinkers could be called, and called themselves, individualists, libertarians, anarchists, and socialists all at once. McElroy gives us a window on the people and times involved. But her work is of more than antiquarian interest: their debates and the issues they faced often sound strikingly modern.
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  8. Mario Günther, A Defence of Falsificationism Against Feyerabend's Epistemological Anarchism Using the Example of Galilei's Observations with the Telescope.score: 21.0
    I confront Feyerabend's position and critical rationalism in order to have a foundation or starting point for my (historical) investigation. The main difference of his position towards falsificationism is the belief that different theories cannot be discussed rationally. Feyerabend is convinced that Galilei's observations with the telescope in the historical context of the Copernican revolution supports his criticism. In particular, he argues that the Copernican theory was supported by deficient hypotheses, and falsifications were disposed by ad hoc hypotheses and propaganda. (...)
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  9. Paul McLaughlin (2002). Mikhail Bakunin: The Philosophical Basis of His Theory of Anarchism. Algora Pub..score: 21.0
    The first English-language philosophical study of Mikhail Bakunin, this book examines the philosophical foundations of Bakunin?
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  10. Charles Sayward (1982). Anarchism and Rights Violations. Critica 14 (40):105-116.score: 21.0
    The justification of the existence of the state should precede the justification of any particular organization of the state. The paper tries to give a clear argument facing anyone who sets out to do the first thing, which is to justify the existence of the state. The problem facing such a person is to identify which premise of the argument is false and explain why it is false.
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  11. Jamie Heckert & Richard Cleminson (eds.) (2011). Anarchism & Sexuality: Ethics, Relationships and Power. Routledge.score: 21.0
  12. A. John Simmons, Philosophical Anarchism.score: 18.0
    Anarchist political philosophers normally include in their theories (or implicitly rely upon) a vision of a social life very different than the life experienced by most persons today. Theirs is a vision of autonomous, noncoercive, productive interaction among equals, liberated from and without need for distinctively political institutions, such as formal legal systems or governments or the state. This "positive" part of anarchist theories, this vision of the good social life, will be discussed only indirectly in this essay. Rather, I (...)
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  13. Jonathan Y. Tsou (2003). Reconsidering Feyerabend's 'Anarchism'. Perspectives on Science 11 (2):208-235.score: 18.0
    This paper explores Paul Feyerabend's (1924-1994) skeptical arguments for "anarchism" in his early writings between 1960 to 1975. Feyerabend's position is encapsulated by his well-known suggestion that the only principle for scientific method that can be defended under all circumstances is: "anything goes." I present Feyerabend's anarchism as a recommendation for pluralism that assumes a realist view of scientific theories. The aims of this paper are threefold: (1) to present a defensible view of Feyerabend's anarchism and its (...)
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  14. Helga Varden (2009). Nozick's Reply to the Anarchist. Law and Philosophy 28 (6):585 - 616.score: 18.0
    Central to Nozick’s Anarchy, State and Utopia is a defense of the legitimacy of the minimal state’s use of coercion against anarchist objections. Individuals acting within their natural rights can establish the state without committing wrongdoing against those who disagree. Nozick attempts to show that even with a natural executive right, individuals need not actually consent to incur political obligations. Nozick’s argument relies on an account of compensation to remedy the infringement of the non-consenters’ procedural rights. Compensation, however, cannot remedy (...)
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  15. Roderick T. Long, Libertarian Anarchism: Responses to ten Objections.score: 18.0
    I want to talk about some of the main objections that have been given to libertarian anarchism and my attempts to answer them. But before I start giving objections and trying to answer them, there is no point in trying to answer objections to a view unless you have given some positive reason to hold the view in the first place. So, I just want to say briefly what I think the positive case is for it before going on (...)
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  16. Steven A. Peterson, Moral Development and Critiques of Anarchism.score: 18.0
    Anarchism, literally, means "without authority," although it is most commonly defined as a system in which social order is maintained voluntaristically, without the presence of a state or any other coercive mechanisms. There are many varieties of anarchism, and it is difficult in just one brief paragraph to specify the central beliefs. Nonetheless, there are some widely shared assertions, among which are (l) the primacy of individual sovereignty; (2) the opposition to coercive authority of any kind impinging upon (...)
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  17. Marja Härmänmaa (2009). Beyond Anarchism: Marinetti's Futurist (Anti-)Utopia of Individualism and 'Artocracy'. The European Legacy 14 (7):857-871.score: 18.0
    This article surveys Filippo Tommaso Marinetti's social utopia from the inception of Futurism until its end during World War II, contextualizing it in relation to the various diffused anarchistic ideologies of European artists and intellectuals. From the second half of the nineteenth century onward radical politics and the artistic avant-garde were in close dialogue. Max Stirner's individual anarchy held a special appeal to modernist artists, including Gabriele D'Annunzio and Marinetti. Marinetti's aim of renovating Italy's cultural and political life initially led (...)
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  18. Helga Varden (2009). Nozick's Reply to the Anarchist What He Said and What He Should Have Said About Procedural Rights. Law and Philosophy 28 (6):585-616.score: 18.0
    Central to Nozick’s Anarchy, State and Utopia is a defense of the legitimacy of the minimal state’s use of coercion against anarchist objections. Individuals acting within their natural rights can establish the state without committing wrongdoing against those who disagree. Nozick attempts to show that even with a natural executive right, individuals need not actually consent to incur political obligations. Nozick’s argument relies on an account of compensation to remedy the infringement of the non-consenters’ procedural rights. Compensation, however, cannot remedy (...)
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  19. Benjamin R. Tucker, Why I Am an Anarchist (1892).score: 18.0
    Century has requested me to answer for his readers. I comply; but, to be frank, I find it a difficult task. If the editor or one of his contributors had only suggested a reason why I should be anything other than an Anarchist, I am sure I should have no difficulty in disputing the argument. And does not this very fact, after all, furnish in itself the best of all reasons why I should be an Anarchist – namely, the impossibility (...)
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  20. Samuel Clark (2007). Living Without Domination: The Possibility of an Anarchist Utopia. Ashgate.score: 18.0
    The book is distinctive in bringing the rigour of analytic political philosophy to anarchism, which is all too often dismissed out of hand or skated over in ...
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  21. Roderick T. Long, Market Anarchism as Constitutionalism.score: 18.0
    A legal system is any institution or set of institutions in a given society that provides dispute resolution in a systematic and reasonably predictable way. it does so through the exercise of three functions: the judicial, the legislative, and the executive. The judicial function, the adjudication of disputes, is the core of any legal system; the other two are ancillary to this. The legislative function is to determine the rules that will govern the process of adjudication (this function may be (...)
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  22. Samuel Clark (2010). Kicking Against the Pricks : Anarchist Perfectionism and the Conditions of Independence. In Benjamin Franks & Matthew Wilson (eds.), Anarchism & Moral Philosophy. Palgrave.score: 18.0
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  23. Christopher Roberson (1998). The State as Rational Authority: An Anarchist Justification of Government. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 18 (4):617-630.score: 18.0
    Joseph Raz's defence of government is grounded in his ‘normal justification thesis’. This thesis justifies the exercise of state authority in just those cases where subjects are more likely to fulfill their duties by obeying the state than by carrying out their own deliberations. I argue that the assumptions underlying this argument are importantly similar to those made by the Enlightenment anarchist philosopher William Godwin. Raz's arguments can supplement Godwin's political theory, producing an argument which, though grounded in anarchist principles, (...)
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  24. Voltairine de Cleyre, Why I Am An Anarchist (1897).score: 18.0
    addressing you, that probably the most easy and natural way for me to explain Anarchism would be for me to give the reasons why I myself am an Anarchist. I am not sure that they were altogether right in the matter, because in giving the reasons why I am an Anarchist, I may perhaps infuse too much of my own personality into the subject, giving reasons sufficient unto myself, but which cool reflection might convince me were not particularly striking (...)
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  25. Don Herzog (2007). Romantic Anarchism and Pedestrian Liberalism. Political Theory 35 (3):313 - 333.score: 18.0
    Emma Goldman's stance toward anarchism was oddly mystified, even loving. Precisely this enchantment led her to see clearly the deep vices of Soviet Russia, when so many on the sane and sober Left were blind to them. So pedestrian liberals ought to relish having the extreme likes of Goldman in their midst. They-we-can faithfully recite their lessons from Mill about free speech, eccentrics, and the proliferation of viewpoints. But more recent liberals and deliberative democrats, insisting on the political centrality (...)
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  26. Sal P. Restivo (2011). Red, Black, and Objective: Science, Sociology, and Anarchism. Ashgate.score: 18.0
    Objectivity revisited and revised -- The social theory of objectivity and its problems -- Sociology : a Copernican revolution changes how we think about science and mathematics -- Science studies : sociological theory and social criticism -- Math studies and the anarchist agenda -- Anarchism and modern science -- What's mind got to do with it? -- Science, religion, and anarchism : the end of God and the beginning of inquiry -- A manifesto in anarcho-sociology -- Appendix. A (...)
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  27. Abraham DeLeon (2008). Oh No, Not the “A” Word! Proposing an “Anarchism” for Education. Educational Studies 44 (2):122-141.score: 18.0
    Anarchist theory has a long-standing history in political theory, sociology, and philosophy. As a radical discourse, anarchist theory pushes educators and researchers towards new conceptualizations of community, theory, and praxis. Early writers, like Joseph Proudhoun and Emma Goldman, to more contemporary anarchists, such as Noam Chomsky, have established anarchist theory as an important school of thought that sits outside the Marxist discourses that have dominated the radical academic scene. Today, anarchists have been responsible for staging effective protests (specifically, Seattle, 1999) (...)
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  28. Carl G. Hedman (1974). An Anarchist Reply to Skinner on 'Weak' Methods of Control. Inquiry 17 (1-4):105 – 111.score: 18.0
    B. F. Skinner has argued that those who are serious about ending war, pollution, etc., must face the fact that the received methods of changing behavior have proved ineffective. According to Skinner, we must replace 'weak' methods of control such as control via praise and blame and control via Rousseau's 'natural contingencies of things' with Skinner's 'strong' methods of control. It is argued that Skinner's case for the continued ineffectiveness of such methods of control rests on the unargued assumption that (...)
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  29. Duane Rousselle (2012). What Comes After Post-Anarchism? Continent 2 (2):152-154.score: 18.0
    continent. 2.2 (2012): 152–154 Levi R. Bryant. The Democracy of Objects . Ann Arbor, MI: Open Humanities Press. 2011. 316 pp. | ISBN 9781607852049. | $23.99 For two decades post-anarchism has adopted an epistemological point of departure for its critique of the representative ontologies of classical anarchism. This critique focused on the classical anarchist conceptualization of power as a unitary phenomenon that operated unidirectionally to repress an otherwise creative and benign human essence. Andrew Koch may have inaugurated this (...)
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  30. Alexander W. Salter, 8. “Christian Anarchism: Communitarian or Capitalist?”.score: 18.0
    I build on Christoyannopoulous’s (2011) compendium of Christian anarchist thought to shed light on the divergence between Christian anarcho-communitarians and Christian anarcho-capitalists. The anarcho-communitarians believe the institution of private property is contrary to the Word of Christ, while the anarcho-capitalists hold it is justifiable. I show that the anarcho-communitarians misunderstand [...].
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  31. Francesco Barone (1972). Protocol Sentences and Scientific Anarchism. Grazer Philosophische Studien 16:327-345.score: 18.0
    Contrary to a common opinion, some theses of scientific anarchism are historically connected not only to Popper's and "second" Wittgenstein's thoughts, but also to some ideas affirmed by the advocates of "physicalism" (like Neurath) during the neopositivistie debate on protocol sentences. The common basis of "physicalism" and "anarchism" is a repulse of the "atomistic" theory of meaning. That is making more adequate the epistemological description of knowledge. But both Neurath and Feyerabend err in thinking that this repulse entails (...)
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  32. Gary Chartier (2009). In Defence of the Anarchist. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 29 (1):115-138.score: 18.0
    Mark Murphy contends that, whatever the merits of any philosophical argument for anarchism, most people are obligated to obey the law. Murphy defends a moral argument designed to show that most people in reasonably just political communities are obligated to obey the law. And he advances epistemological arguments calculated to support two key claims. First, people who believe they are obligated to obey the law are entitled to retain their belief in the face of anarchist criticism. Second, a credible (...)
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  33. Ray Monk (2007). Bourgeois, Bolshevist or Anarchist?: The Reception of Wittgenstein's Philosophy of Mathematics. In Guy Kahane, Edward Kanterian & Oskari Kuusela (eds.), Wittgenstein and His Interpreters: Essays in Memory of Gordon Baker. Blackwell Pub..score: 18.0
    Introduction 1. Perspectives on Wittgenstein: An Intermittently Opinionated Survey: Hans-Johann Glock. 2. Wittgenstein's Method: Ridding People of Philosophical Prejudices: Katherine Morris. 3. Gordon Baker's Late Interpretation of Wittgenstein: P. M. S. Hacker. 4. The Interpretation of the Philosophical Investigations: Style, Therapy, Nachlass: Alois Pichler. 5. Ways of Reading Wittgenstein: Observations on Certain Uses of the Word 'Metaphysics': Joachim Schulte. 6. Metaphysical/Everyday Use: A Note on a Late Paper by Gordon Baker: Hilary Putnam. 7. Wittgenstein and Transcendental Idealism: A. W. Moore. (...)
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  34. Michael Seidman (2012). An Anarchist History is It “Group Versus State” or “Individual Versus Society”? Common Knowledge 18 (3):538-540.score: 18.0
    According to James C. Scott, in The Art of Not Being Governed, the resistance of Southeast Asian “hill peoples” to state subordination manifested itself in their deliberate abandonment of both sedentary agriculture and literacy. He argues that “tribality” (group-generated state evasion) is the polar opposite of “peasantry” (state-controlled agriculture). The hill peoples’ foraging and swiddening were thus political choices. Scott’s anthropological and geographical approach to these historical studies is admirable, but, despite his book’s subtitle (An Anarchist History of Upland Southeast (...)
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  35. Alan Carter (2011). Anarchism: Some Theoretical Foundations. Journal of Political Ideologies 16 (3):245-264.score: 18.0
    This article considers two different, yet related, theoretical approaches that could be employed to ground the anarchist critique of Marxist-Leninist revolutionary practice, and thus of the state in general: the State-Primacy Theory and the Quadruplex Theory. The State-Primacy Theory appears to be consistent with several of Bakunin's claims about the state. However, the Quadruplex Theory might, in fact, turn out to be no less consistent with Bakunin's claims than the State-Primacy Theory. In addition, the Quadruplex Theory seems no less capable (...)
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  36. Abraham P. DeLeon (2012). Anarchism…is a Living Force Within Our Life…” Anarchism, Education and Alternative Possibilities. Educational Studies 48 (1):5-11.score: 18.0
    (2012). “Anarchism…is a living force within our life…” Anarchism, Education and Alternative Possibilities. Educational Studies: Vol. 48, “Anarchism … is a living force within our life …” Anarchism, Education and Alternative Possibilities, pp. 5-11.
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  37. Vittorio Frigerio (2003). Aesthetic Contradictions and Ideological Representations: Anarchist Avant-Garde Vs Swashbuckling Melodrama, on Richard Porton Film and the Anarchist Imagination. Film-Philosophy 7 (7).score: 18.0
    Richard Porton _Film and the Anarchist Imagination_ London and New York: Verso, 1999 ISBN: 1-85984-702-1 314 pp.
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  38. Robert Graham (1985). Anarchism: A Theoretical Analysis. Telos 1985 (64):197-202.score: 18.0
    Anarchism has not been well served by the academy, but if the books under review are any indication, perhaps things are changing. Alan Ritter's Anarchism: A Theoretical Analysis and Michael Taylor's Community, Anarchy and Liberty both make original contributions to anarchist theory, while David Miller's Anarchism constitutes a thorough and competent introduction to the subject. Ostensibly providing an analysis of classical anarchist theory as developed by Godwin, Proudhon, Bakunin and Kropotkin, Ritter has in fact achieved a modest (...)
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  39. Jamie Heckert (2010). Listening, Caring, Becoming: Anarchism as an Ethics of Direct Relationships. In Benjamin Franks & Matthew Wilson (eds.), Anarchism & Moral Philosophy. Palgrave. 186--207.score: 18.0
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  40. Peter T. Leeson (2012). Poking Hobbes in the Eye a Plea for Mechanism in Anarchist History. Common Knowledge 18 (3):541-546.score: 18.0
    James C. Scott’s The Art of Not Being Governed: An Anarchist History of Upland Southeast Asia argues that the Zomia people of Southeast Asia consciously chose to live without government and that their choice was sensible. Yet basic economic reasoning, reflected in Hobbes’s classic account of anarchy and the state’s emergence, suggests that life without government would be far worse than life with government, leading people to universally choose the latter. To reconcile Scott’s account of the Zomia peoples’ choice with (...)
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  41. John Lupinacci (2012). A Review of “Anarchism and Education: A Philosophical Perspective”. [REVIEW] Educational Studies 48 (1):108-111.score: 18.0
    (2012). A Review of “Anarchism and Education: A Philosophical Perspective”. Educational Studies: Vol. 48, “Anarchism … is a living force within our life …” Anarchism, Education and Alternative Possibilities, pp. 108-111.
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  42. O. A. Naumenko (2008). Historical and Humanistic Value of Views of Theorists of Russian Anarchism. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 16:191-195.score: 18.0
    The World abounds with infinite crimes, technogenic accidents, acts of nature, etc. And very often, speaking about infringement of laws, use a word "anarchy". In consciousness of one people this concept associates with fear, personifies something mad, uncontrollable, and not giving in to the control. In consciousness ofothers - it means permissiveness, impunity for any acts and even crimes. The philosopher, in my opinion, is the avocate of a historical value and validity. And consequently it is necessary to observe these (...)
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  43. Mark Wolfmeyer (2012). In Defense of Mathematics and its Place in Anarchist Education. Educational Studies 48 (1):39-51.score: 18.0
    This article reclaims mathematics from the measures of profit and control by first presenting an anarchist analysis of mathematics? status quo societal uses and pedagogic activities. From this analysis, a vision for an anarchist math education is developed, as well as suggestions for how government school practitioners sympathetic to anarchism can insert this vision into their current work. Aspects to this vision include teacher autonomy, freedom from hierarchical curriculum structure and math class as a non-coercive, happy place. Finally, mathematics (...)
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  44. Felecia M. Briscoe (2012). Anarchist, Neoliberal, & Democratic Decision-Making: Deepening the Joy in Learning and Teaching. Educational Studies 48 (1):76-102.score: 18.0
    Using a critical postmodern framework, this article analyzes the relationship of the decision-making processes of anarchism and neoliberalism to that of deep democracy. Anarchist processes are found to share common core principals with deep democracy; but neoliberal processes are found to be antithetical to deep democracy. To increase the joy in learning and teaching, based upon this analysis, practical anarchist guidelines for school decision-making are suggested.
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  45. G. Brown (2011). Anarchism and Amateurism in the Creation of Autonomous Queer Spaces. In Jamie Heckert & Richard Cleminson (eds.), Anarchism & Sexuality: Ethics, Relationships and Power. Routledge. 200--223.score: 18.0
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  46. Kory DeClark (2010). Autonomy, Taxation and Ownership: An Anarchist Critique of Kant's Theory of Property. In Benjamin Franks & Matthew Wilson (eds.), Anarchism & Moral Philosophy. Palgrave.score: 18.0
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  47. Erin E. Doran (2012). A Review of “Contemporary Anarchist Studies: An Introductory Anthology of Anarchy in the Academy”. [REVIEW] Educational Studies 48 (1):103-107.score: 18.0
    (2012). A Review of “Contemporary Anarchist Studies: An Introductory Anthology of Anarchy in the Academy”. Educational Studies: Vol. 48, “Anarchism … is a living force within our life …” Anarchism, Education and Alternative Possibilities, pp. 103-107.
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  48. Jamie Heckert, Deric Michael Shannon & Abbey Willis (2012). Loving-Teaching: Notes for Queering Anarchist Pedagogies. Educational Studies 48 (1):12-29.score: 18.0
    At times, radical theory can propose a singular story of the nature of power, suggesting that it must either be taken or abolished. This then becomes intertwined with a pedagogical strategy of recruitment, whereby others are encouraged to share in this ideological framework and the political practices based upon it. In this article, we propose an alternative based on practices of freedom and the role of love in subverting interdependent patterns of normativity and hierarchy. Bringing together anarchist, feminist, and queer (...)
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  49. Jones Irwin (2010). A Well-Being Out of Nihilism: On the Affinities Between Nietzsche and Anarchist Thought. In Benjamin Franks & Matthew Wilson (eds.), Anarchism & Moral Philosophy. Palgrave. 208.score: 18.0
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  50. Nathan Jun (2010). Anarchist Philosophy: Past, Problems and Prospects. In Benjamin Franks & Matthew Wilson (eds.), Anarchism & Moral Philosophy. Palgrave. 45--66.score: 18.0
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