Search results for 'animal ethics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. José Luis Bermúdez (2007). Thinking Without Words: An Overview for Animal Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 11 (3):319 - 335.score: 246.0
    In Thinking without Words I develop a philosophical framework for treating some animals and human infants as genuine thinkers. This paper outlines the aspects of this account that are most relevant to those working in animal ethics. There is a range of different levels of cognitive sophistication in different animal species, in addition to limits to the types of thought available to non-linguistic creatures, and it may be important for animal ethicists to take this into account (...)
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  2. Frank Kupper & Tjard Cock Bunindeg (2011). Deliberating Animal Values: A Pragmatic—Pluralistic Approach to Animal Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (5):431-450.score: 246.0
    Debates in animal ethics are largely characterized by ethical monism, the search for a single, timeless, and essential trait in which the moral standing of animals can be grounded. In this paper, we argue that a monistic approach towards animal ethics hampers and oversimplifies the moral debate. The value pluralism present in our contemporary societies requires a more open and flexible approach to moral inquiry. This paper advocates the turn to a pragmatic, pluralistic approach to (...) ethics. It contributes to the development of such an approach in two ways. It offers a pragmatist critique of ethical monism in animal ethics and presents the results of a qualitative study into the value diversity present in the different ways of thinking about animals in the Netherlands. Carefully arranged group discussions resulted in the reconstruction of four distinctive moral value frameworks that may serve as instruments in the future process of moral inquiry and deliberation in the reflection on animal use. (shrink)
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  3. Bernard E. Rollin (2005). Reasonable Partiality and Animal Ethics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 8 (1-2):105 - 121.score: 242.0
    Moral psychology is often ignored in ethical theory, making applied ethics difficult to achieve in practice. This is particularly true in the new field of animal ethics. One key feature of moral psychology is recognition of the moral primacy of those with whom we enjoy relationships of love and friendship – philia in Aristotles term. Although a radically new ethic for animal treatment is emerging in society, its full expression is severely limited by our exploitative uses (...)
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  4. Bernard E. Rollin (2006). The Regulation of Animal Research and the Emergence of Animal Ethics: A Conceptual History. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (4):285-304.score: 240.0
    The history of the regulation of animal research is essentially the history of the emergence of meaningful social ethics for animals in society. Initially, animal ethics concerned itself solely with cruelty, but this was seen as inadequate to late 20th-century concerns about animal use. The new social ethic for animals was quite different, and its conceptual bases are explored in this paper. The Animal Welfare Act of 1966 represented a very minimal and in many (...)
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  5. Kelly Oliver (2010). Animal Ethics: Toward an Ethics of Responsiveness. Research in Phenomenology 40 (2):267-280.score: 228.0
    The concepts of animal, human, and rights are all part of a philosophical tradition that trades on foreclosing the animal, animality, and animals. Rather than looking to qualities or capacities that make animals the same as or different from humans, I investigate the relationship between the human and the animal. To insist, as animal rights and welfare advocates do, that our ethical obligations to animals are based on their similarities to us reinforces the type of humanism (...)
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  6. John Grey (2013). 'Use Them At Our Pleasure': Spinoza on Animal Ethics. History of Philosophy Quarterly 30 (4):367-388.score: 218.0
    Although Spinoza disagrees with Descartes's claim that animals are mindless, he holds that we may nevertheless treat them as we please because their natures are different from human nature. Margaret Wilson has questioned the validity of Spinoza's argument, since it is not clear why differences in nature should imply differences in ethical status. In this paper, I propose a new interpretation of Spinoza's argument that responds to Wilson's challenge. We have ethical commitments to other humans only because we share the (...)
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  7. Joanne Sneddon & Bernard Rollin (2010). Mulesing and Animal Ethics. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 23 (4):371-386.score: 216.0
    People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) called for a ban on mulesing in the Australian sheep industry in 2004. Mulesing is a surgical procedure that removes wool-bearing skin from the tail and breech area of sheep in order to prevent flystrike (cutaneous myiasis). Flystrike occurs when flies lay their eggs in soiled areas of wool on the sheep and can be fatal for the sheep host. PETA claimed that mulesing subjects sheep to unnecessary pain and suffering and took (...)
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  8. Scott D. Churchill (2010). ≪b>empathy, Intercorporeality, and the Call to Compassion ≪/B≫ Ralph R. Acampora, Corporal Compassion: Animal Ethics and Philosophy of Body. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2006. 201 Pages. [REVIEW] Society and Animals 18 (2):219-225.score: 212.0
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  9. Ramona Cristina Ilea (2009). The Animal Ethics Reader (2nd Edition). Teaching Philosophy 32 (1):83-86.score: 210.0
  10. Misago Seth & Fredy Saguti (2012). Animal Research Ethics in Africa: Is Tanzania Making Progress? Developing World Bioethics 12 (3):158-162.score: 210.0
    The significance of animals in research cannot be over-emphasized. The use of animals for research and training in research centres, hospitals and schools is progressively increasing. Advances in biotechnology to improve animal productivity require animal research. Drugs being developed and new interventions or therapies being invented for cure and palliation of all sorts of animal diseases and conditions need to be tested in animals for their safety and efficacy at some stages of their development. Drugs and interventions (...)
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  11. Denise Russell (2013). Animal Ethics Committee Guidelines and Shark Research. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (4):541-542.score: 210.0
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  12. Susan J. Armstrong & Richard George Botzler (eds.) (2008). The Animal Ethics Reader. Routledge.score: 204.0
    The Animal Ethics Reader is the first comprehensive, state-of-the-art anthology of readings on this substantial area of study and interest. A subject that regularly captures the headlines, the book is designed to appeal to anyone interested in tracing the history of the subject, as well as providing a powerful insight into the debate as it has developed. The recent wealth of material published in this area has not, until now, been collected in one volume. Readings are arranged thematically, (...)
     
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  13. M. Gjerris, C. Gamborg, H. Röcklinsberg & R. Anthony (2011). The Price of Responsibility: Ethics of Animal Husbandry in a Time of Climate Change. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (4):331-350.score: 198.0
    This paper examines the challenges that climate change raises for animal agriculture and discusses the contributions that may come from a virtue ethics based approach. Two scenarios of the future role of animals in farming are set forth and discussed in terms of their ethical implications. The paper argues that when trying to tackle both climate and animal welfare issues in farming, proposals that call for a reorientation of our ethics and technology must first and foremost (...)
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  14. Fredrik Karlsson (2012). Critical Anthropomorphism and Animal Ethics. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (5):707-720.score: 198.0
    Anthropomorphism has long been considered a cardinal error when describing animals. Ethicists have feared the consequences of misrepresenting animals in their reasoning. Recent research within human-animal studies, however, has sophisticated the notion of anthropomorphism. It is suggested that avoiding anthropomorphism merely creates other morphisms, such as mechanomorphism. Instead of avoiding anthropomorphism, it is argued that it is a communicative strategy that should be used critically. Instances of anthropomorphism in animal ethics are analyzed in this paper. Some analogies (...)
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  15. Jes Lynning Harfeld (2013). Telos and the Ethics of Animal Farming. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (3):691-709.score: 198.0
    The concept of animal welfare in confinement agriculture—and an ethical theory based upon this concept—necessitates an idea of what kind of being it is that fares well and what “well” is for this being. This double-question is at the heart of understanding and adequately defining welfare as qualitatively embedded in the experiencing subject. The notion of telos derives (philosophically) from Aristotle and is a way of accounting for the good life of an animal from the unique speciesness of (...)
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  16. Bernard E. Rollin (2007). Animal Mind: Science, Philosophy, and Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 11 (3):253-274.score: 192.0
    Although 20th-century empiricists were agnostic about animal mind and consciousness, this was not the case for their historical ancestors – John Locke, David Hume, Jeremy Bentham, John Stuart Mill, and, of course, Charles Darwin and George John Romanes. Given the dominance of the Darwinian paradigm of evolutionary continuity, one would not expect belief in animal mind to disappear. That it did demonstrates that standard accounts of how scientific hypotheses are overturned – i.e., by empirical disconfirmation or by exposure (...)
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  17. Gary E. Varner (1998). In Nature's Interests?: Interests, Animal Rights, and Environmental Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 192.0
    This book offers a powerful response to what Varner calls the "two dogmas of environmental ethics"--the assumptions that animal rights philosophies and anthropocentric views are each antithetical to sound environmental policy. Allowing that every living organism has interests which ought, other things being equal, to be protected, Varner contends that some interests take priority over others. He defends both a sentientist principle giving priority to the lives of organisms with conscious desires and an anthropocentric principle giving priority (...)
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  18. Elisa Aaltola (2010). The Anthropocentric Paradigm and the Posibility of Animal Ethics. Ethics and the Environment 15 (1):pp. 27-50.score: 186.0
    Animal ethics has presented various 'pro-animal arguments' according to which non-human animals have a more significant moral status than traditionally assumed. Although these arguments (brought forward, for instance, by Peter Singer, Tom Regan, Mary Midgley, Stephen Clark, and Mark Rowlands) have been met with various forms of criticism, a quick overview of animal ethics literature suggests that they are difficult to overcome. Pro-animal arguments seem to have consistency and argumentative support on their side. However, (...)
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  19. Elisa Aaltola (2005). Animal Ethics and Interest Conflicts. Ethics and the Environment 10 (1):19-48.score: 186.0
    : Animal ethics has presented convincing arguments for the individual value of animals. Animals are not only valuable instrumentally or indirectly, but in themselves. Less has been written about interest conflicts between humans and other animals, and the use of animals in practice. The motive of this paper is to analyze different approaches to interest conflicts. It concentrates on six models, which are the rights model, the interest model, the mental complexity model, the special relations model, the multi-criteria (...)
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  20. Ruth Abbey (2007). Rawlsian Resources for Animal Ethics. Ethics and the Environment 12 (1):1-22.score: 186.0
    : This article considers what contribution the work of John Rawls can make to questions about animal ethics. It argues that there are more normative resources in A Theory of Justice for a concern with animal welfare than some of Rawls's critics acknowledge. However, the move from A Theory of Justice to Political Liberalism sees a depletion of normative resources in Rawlsian thought for addressing animal ethics. The article concludes by endorsing the implication of A (...)
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  21. Colin Allen & Marc Bekoff (2007). Animal Minds, Cognitive Ethology, and Ethics. Journal of Ethics 11 (3):299-317.score: 186.0
    Our goal in this paper is to provide enough of an account of the origins of cognitive ethology and the controversy surrounding it to help ethicists to gauge for themselves how to balance skepticism and credulity about animal minds when communicating with scientists. We believe that ethicists’ arguments would benefit from better understanding of the historical roots of ongoing controversies. It is not appropriate to treat some widely reported results in animal cognition as if their interpretations are a (...)
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  22. Stefan Aerts, Dirk Lips, Stuart Spencer, Eddy Decuypere & Johan De Tavernier (2006). A New Framework for the Assessment of Animal Welfare: Integrating Existing Knowledge From a Practical Ethics Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (1):67-76.score: 186.0
    When making an assessment of animal welfare, it is important to take environmental (housing) or animal-based parameters into account. An alternative approach is to focus on the behavior and appearance of the animal, without making actual measurements or quantifying this. None of these tell the whole story. In this paper, we suggest that it is possible to find common ground between these (seemingly) diametrically opposed positions and argue that this may be the way to deal with the (...)
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  23. M. Ideland (2009). Different Views on Ethics: How Animal Ethics is Situated in a Committee Culture. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (4):258-261.score: 186.0
    Research that includes non-human animal experimentation is fundamentally a dilemmatic enterprise. Humans use other animals in research to improve life for their own species. Ethical principles are established to deal with this dilemma. But despite this ethical apparatus, people who in one way or another work with animal experimentation have to interpret and understand the principles from their individual points of view. In interviews with members of Swedish animal ethics committees, different views on what the term (...)
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  24. Robert Heeger & Frans W. A. Brom (2001). Intrinsic Value and Direct Duties: From Animal Ethics Towards Environmental Ethics? [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 14 (2):241-252.score: 184.0
    Three types of concern for animal welfare are widelyheld: Animals should feel well, they should function well, andthey should lead natural lives. The paper deals with a well-knownanswer to the question of why such concerns are morallyappropriate: Human beings have direct duties towards animals,because animals are beings that can flourish, the flourishing ofanimals is intrinsically or inherently valuable, and that whichis conducive to their flourishing is a legitimate object of moralconcern. Looking for a tenable conception of direct dutiestowards animals, (...)
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  25. Colin Allen (2006). Ethics and the Science of Animal Minds. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (4):375-394.score: 182.0
    Ethicists have commonly appealed to science to bolster their arguments for elevating the moral status of nonhuman animals. I describe a framework within which I take many ethicists to be making such appeals. I focus on an apparent gap in this framework between those properties of animals that are part of the scientific consensus, and those to which ethicists typically appeal in their arguments. I will describe two different ways of diminishing the appearance of the gap, and argue that both (...)
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  26. Greg Goodale & Jason Edward Black (eds.) (2010). Arguments About Animal Ethics. Lexington Books.score: 182.0
    The essays in this volume cover a wide range of topics, such as the campaigns waged by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (including the sexy ...
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  27. Matthew Calarco (2004). Deconstruction is Not Vegetarianism: Humanism, Subjectivity, and Animal Ethics. Continental Philosophy Review 37 (2):175-201.score: 180.0
    This essay examines Jacques Derrida’s contribution to recent debates in animal philosophy in order to explore the critical promise of his work for contemporary discourses on animal ethics and vegetarianism. The essay is divided into two sections, both of which have as their focus Derrida’s interview with Jean-Luc Nancy entitled “‘Eating Well’, or the Calculation of the Subject.” My task in the initial section is to assess the claim made by Derrida in this interview that Levinas’s work (...)
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  28. Kirsten Schmidt (2011). Concepts of Animal Welfare in Relation to Positions in Animal Ethics. Acta Biotheoretica 59 (2):153-171.score: 180.0
    When animal ethicists deal with welfare they seem to face a dilemma: On the one hand, they recognize the necessity of welfare concepts for their ethical approaches. On the other hand, many animal ethicists do not want to be considered reformist welfarists. Moreover, animal welfare scientists may feel pressed by moral demands for a fundamental change in our attitude towards animals. The analysis of this conflict from the perspective of animal ethics shows that animal (...)
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  29. Richard Holton & Rae Langton (1998). Empathy and Animal Ethics. In Dale Jamieson (ed.), Singer and His Critics. Oxford.score: 180.0
    In responding to the challenge that we cannot know that animals feel pain, Peter Singer says: We can never directly experience the pain of another being, whether that being is human or not. When I see my daughter fall and scrape her knee, I know that she feels pain because of the way she behaves—she cries, she tells me her knee hurts, she rubs the sore spot, and so on. I know that I myself behave in a somewhat similar—if more (...)
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  30. Philip Howell (2002). A Place for the Animal Dead: Pets, Pet Cemeteries and Animal Ethics in Late Victorian Britain. Ethics, Place and Environment 5 (1):5 – 22.score: 180.0
    The recent 'animal turn' in geography has contributed to a critical examination of the inseparable geographies of human and non-human animals, and has a clear ethical dimension. This paper is intended to explore these same ethical issues through a consideration of the historical geography of petkeeping as this relates to the death and commemoration of favourite household animals. The emergence of the pet cemetery, towards the end of the 19th century, is a significant step in itself, but this was (...)
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  31. Anca Gheaus (2012). The Role of Love in Animal Ethics. Hypatia 27 (3):583-600.score: 180.0
    Philosophers working on animal ethics have focused, with good reason, on the wrongness of cruelty toward animals and of devaluing their lives. I argue that the theoretical resources of animal ethics are far from exhausted. Moreover, reflection on what makes animals ethically significant is relevant for thinking about the roots of morality and therefore about ethical relationships between human beings. I rely on a normative approach to animal ethics grounded in the importance of meeting (...)
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  32. Daniel A. Dombrowski (2012). Review Animal Ethics in Context Palmer Clare Columbia University Press New York, NY. Journal of Animal Ethics 2 (1):113-115.score: 180.0
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  33. Fröding & Martin Peterson (2011). Animal Ethics Based on Friendship. Journal of Animal Ethics 1 (1):58-69.score: 180.0
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  34. Susan Armstrong & Richard G. Botzler (eds.) (2003). Animal Ethics Reader. Routledge.score: 180.0
    The Animal Ethics Reader is the first comprehensive, state-of-the-art anthology of readings on this substantial area of study and interest. A subject that regularly captures the headlines, the book is designed to appeal to anyone interested in tracing the history of the subject, as well as providing a powerful insight into the debate as it has developed. The recent wealth of material published in this area has not, until now, been collected in one volume. Readings are arranged thematically, (...)
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  35. Richard D. Besel & Renee S. Besel (2010). Whale Wars and the Public Screen: Mediating Animal Ethics in Violent Times. In Greg Goodale & Jason Edward Black (eds.), Arguments About Animal Ethics. Lexington Books.score: 180.0
     
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  36. E. McKenna, A. Light & E. Pluhar (2008). Armstrong, SJ (Ed.)(2004) Animal Ethics. Essays in Philosophy 5.2< Www. Humboldt. Edu/-Essays/Archives. Htm L> Carruthers, P.(1992) The Animals Issue, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. DeGrazia, D.(1998) Taking Animals Seriously: Mental Life and Moral Status, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. [REVIEW] In Susan J. Armstrong & Richard George Botzler (eds.), The Animal Ethics Reader. Routledge. 63.score: 180.0
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  37. Carlos Naconecy (2014). New Perspectives on Animal Ethics. Journal of Animal Ethics 4 (2):80-85,.score: 180.0
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  38. David Sztybel (2011). Being Careful About Caring: Feminism and Animal Ethics. Journal of Animal Ethics 1 (2):215-225.score: 180.0
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  39. Dr Andrew N. Rowan (1995). Ethics Education in Science and Engineering: The Case of Animal Research. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 1 (2):181-184.score: 176.0
    The past one hundred fifty years of debate over the use of animals in research and testing has been characterized mainly byad hominem attacks and on uncritical rejection of the other sides’ arguments. In the classroom, it is important to avoid repeating exercises in public relations and to demand sound scholarship.
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  40. Andrew Linzey (2009). Why Animal Suffering Matters: Philosophy, Theology, and Practical Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 168.0
    Introduction: Reason, ethics, and animals -- Part I: Making the rational case -- Why animal suffering matters morally -- How we minimize animal suffering and how we can change -- Part II: Three practical critiques -- First case: Hunting with dogs -- Second case: Fur farming -- Third case: Commercial sealing -- Conclusion: Re-establishing animals and children as a common cause and six objections considered.
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  41. Whitley R. P. Kaufman (2014). Does Animal Ethics Need a Darwinian Revolution? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (4):807-818.score: 166.0
    A frequent argument is that Darwin’s theory of evolution has or should revolutionize our conception of the relation between humans and animals, though society has yet to take account of that revolution in our treatment of animals. On this view, after Darwin demonstrated the essential continuity of humans and animals, traditional morality must be rejected as speciesist in seeing humans as fundamentally distinct from other animals. In fact, the argument is of dubious merit. While there is plenty of room for (...)
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  42. Warwick P. Anderson & Michael A. Perry (1999). Australian Animal Ethics Committees: We Have Come a Long Way. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (01):80-86.score: 164.0
    Twenty years ago, Australian biomedical researchers took the first steps along a pathway toward common ground with opponents of the use of animals in science. Leaders of Australian medical research at that time saw the necessity of established science facing the ethical and political challenges that a revived antivivisectionist movement was mounting in the late 1970s and the 1980s.
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  43. Rod Preece (2007). Thoughts Out of Season on the History of Animal Ethics. Society and Animals 15 (4):365-378.score: 164.0
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  44. Cathryn Bailey (2005). On the Backs of Animals: The Valorization of Reason in Contemporary Animal Ethics. Ethics and the Environment 10 (1):1-17.score: 162.0
    : Despite the fact that feminists have compellingly drawn connections between traditional notions of reason and the oppression of women and nature, many animal ethicists fail to deeply incorporate these insights. After detailing the links between reason and the oppression of women and animals, I argue that the work of philosophers such as Tom Regan and Peter Singer fails to reflect that what feminists have called is not the mere inclusion of emotion, but a recognition of the inherent continuity (...)
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  45. Jacky Turner & Joyce D'Silva (eds.) (2006). Animals, Ethics, and Trade: The Challenge of Animal Sentience. Earthscan.score: 160.0
    can be adapted and adopted by developing countries. IFC sees this as being an area where we may be able to benchmark and promote positive change. ● The force of global trade initiatives also influences animal welfare.
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  46. Robert Francescotti (2007). Animal Mind and Animal Ethics: An Introduction. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 11 (3):239-252.score: 156.0
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  47. D. DeGrazia (1998). Animal Ethics Around the Turn of the Twenty-First Century. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 11 (2):111-129.score: 156.0
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  48. M. Dol, Soemini Kasanmoentalib, Susanne Lijmbach, E. Rivas & Ruud van den Bos (2002). Animal Consciousness and Animal Ethics. Van Gorcum and Co.score: 156.0
    Dutch investigators continue to play a key role in animal behavior studies today . The present collection of current Dutch writings on animal consciousness ...
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  49. J. M. Dieterle (2011). Animal Ethics in Context. Environmental Ethics 33 (2):223-224.score: 156.0
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  50. Hugh Lehman (1998). Marcel Dol, Soemini Kasanmoentalib, Susanne Lijmbch, Esteban Rivas, Ruud Van den Bos, Animal Consciousness and Animal Ethics: Perspectives From the Netherlands. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 11 (1):68-71.score: 156.0
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