Search results for 'animal rights' (try it on Scholar)

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Bibliography: Animal Rights in Applied Ethics
  1. Moral Rights (1987). Animal Liberation or Animal Rights?, Peter Singer. The Monist 70 (1).score: 480.0
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  2. Steven M. Wise & Animal Rights (2004). One Step at a Time'. In Cass R. Sunstein & Martha Craven Nussbaum (eds.), Animal Rights: Current Debates and New Directions. Oxford University Press.score: 270.0
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  3. Uriah Kriegel (2013). Animal Rights: A Non‐Consequentialist Approach. In K. Petrus & M. Wild (eds.), Animal Minds and Animal Ethics. Transcript.score: 93.0
    It is a curious fact about mainstream discussions of animal rights that they are dominated by consequentialist defenses thereof, when consequentialism in general has been on the wane in other areas of moral philosophy. In this paper, I describe an alternative, non‐consequentialist ethical framework (combining Kantian and virtue‐ethical elements) and argue that it grants (conscious) animals more expansive rights than consequentialist proponents of animal rights typically grant. The cornerstone of this non‐consequentialist framework is the thought (...)
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  4. A. S. Franklin, B. K. Tranter & R. D. White (2001). Explaining Support for Animal Rights: A Comparison of Two Recent Approaches to Humans, Nonhuman Animals, and Postmodernity. Society and Animals 9 (2):127-144.score: 91.0
    Questions on "animal rights" in a cross-national survey conducted in 1993 provide an opportunity to compare the applicability to this issue of two theories of the socio-political changes summed up in "postmodernity": Inglehart's (1997) thesis of "postmaterialist values" and Franklin's (1999) synthesis of theories of late modernity. Although Inglehart seems not to have addressed human-nonhuman animal relations, it is reasonable to apply his theory of changing values under conditions of "existential security" to "animal rights." Inglehart's (...)
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  5. David DeGrazia (2002). Animal Rights: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.score: 90.0
    This volume provides a general overview of the basic ethical and philosophical issues of animal rights. It asks questions such as: Do animals have moral rights? If so, what does this mean? What sorts of mental lives do animals have, and how should we understand welfare? By presenting models for understanding animals' moral status and rights, and examining their mental lives and welfare, David DeGrazia explores the implications for how we should treat animals in connection with (...)
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  6. Marc Bekoff (1997). Deep Ethology, Animal Rights, and the Great Ape/Animal Project: Resisting Speciesism and Expanding the Community of Equals. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 10 (3):269-296.score: 90.0
    In this essay I argue that the evolutionary and comparative study of nonhuman animal (hereafter animal) cognition in a wide range of taxa by cognitive ethologists can readily inform discussions about animal protection and animal rights. However, while it is clear that there is a link between animal cognitive abilities and animal pain and suffering, I agree with Jeremy Bentham who claimed long ago the real question does not deal with whether individuals can (...)
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  7. Stephen St C. Bostock (1993). Zoos and Animal Rights: The Ethics of Keeping Animals. Routledge.score: 90.0
    Zoos and animal rights seem utterly opposed to each other. In this controversial and timely book, Stephen Bostock argues that they can develop a more harmonious relationship. He examines the diverse ethical and technical issues involved, including human cruelty, human domination over animals, the well-being of wild animals outside their natural habitat, and the nature of wild and domestic animals. In his analysis, Bostock draws attention to the areas which give rise to misconceptions. This book explores the long (...)
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  8. Gary E. Varner (1998). In Nature's Interests?: Interests, Animal Rights, and Environmental Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 90.0
    This book offers a powerful response to what Varner calls the "two dogmas of environmental ethics"--the assumptions that animal rights philosophies and anthropocentric views are each antithetical to sound environmental policy. Allowing that every living organism has interests which ought, other things being equal, to be protected, Varner contends that some interests take priority over others. He defends both a sentientist principle giving priority to the lives of organisms with conscious desires and an anthropocentric principle giving priority (...)
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  9. John M. Kistler (2002). People Promoting and People Opposing Animal Rights: In Their Own Words. Greenwood Press.score: 90.0
    Explores the many issues surrounding the animal rights and animal welfare movements through personal interview responses from rights activists.
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  10. Aaron Garrett, Richard Dean, Humphrey Primatt, John Oswald & Thomas Young (eds.) (1713/2000). Animal Rights and Souls in the Eighteenth Century. Thoemmes Press.score: 90.0
    The publication of 'Animal Rights and Souls in the 18th Century' will be welcomed by everyone interested in the development of the modern animal liberation movement, as well as by those who simply want to savour the work of enlightenment thinkers pushing back the boundaries of both science and ethics. At last these long out-of-print texts are again available to be read and enjoyed - and what texts they are! Gems like Bougeant's witty reductio of the Christian (...)
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  11. Marna A. Owen (2009). Animal Rights: Noble Cause or Needless Effort? Twenty-First Century Books.score: 90.0
    Discusses the history of animal rights; laws about how animals are treated; moral issues involved in using animals in such fields as medical research and ...
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  12. Cass R. Sunstein & Martha Craven Nussbaum (eds.) (2004). Animal Rights: Current Debates and New Directions. Oxford University Press.score: 90.0
    Cass Sunstein and Martha Nussbaum bring together an all-star cast of contributors to explore the legal and political issues that underlie the campaign for animal rights and the opposition to it. Addressing ethical questions about ownership, protection against unjustified suffering, and the ability of animals to make their own choices free from human control, the authors offer numerous different perspectives on animal rights and animal welfare. They show that whatever one's ultimate conclusions, the relationship between (...)
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  13. Sue Donaldson & Will Kymlicka (2011). Zoopolis: A Political Theory of Animal Rights. OUP Oxford.score: 90.0
    Zoopolis offers a new agenda for the theory and practice of animal rights. Most animal rights theory focuses on the intrinsic capacities or interests of animals, and the moral status and moral rights that these intrinsic characteristics give rise to. Zoopolis shifts the debate from the realm of moral theory and applied ethics to the realm of political theory, focusing on the relational obligations that arise from the varied ways that animals relate to human societies (...)
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  14. Paul Waldau (2010). Animal Rights: What Everyone Needs to Know. Oxford University Press.score: 90.0
    General information -- The animals themselves -- Philosophical arguments -- Laws -- Political realities -- Social realities -- Education and the arts -- Contemporary sciences -- Major figures and organizations in the animal rights movement -- The future of animal rights.
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  15. Stephen Cooke (2012). Animal Rights and Environmental Terrorism. Journal of Terrorism Research 4 (2):26-36.score: 90.0
    Many paradigmatic forms of animal rights and environmental activism have been classed as terrorism both in popular discourse and in law. This paper argues that the labelling of many violent forms of direct action carried out in the name of animal rights or environmentalism as ‘terrorism’ is incorrect. Furthermore, the claim is also made that even those acts which are correctly termed as terrorism are not necessarily wrongful acts. The result of this analysis is to call (...)
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  16. Hon-Lam Li (1997). &Quot;abortion and Degrees of Personhood: Understanding the Impasse of the Abortion Problem (and the Animal Rights Problem)&Quot;. Public Affairs Quarterly 11 (1):1-19.score: 90.0
    I argue that the personhood of a fetus is analogous to the the heap. If this is correct, then the moral status or intrinsic value of a fetus would be supervenient upon the fetus's biological development. Yet to compare its claim vis-a-vis its mother's, we need to consider not only their moral status, but also the type of claim they each have. Thus we have to give weight to the two factors or variables of the mother's moral status and her (...)
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  17. Tom Regan (2009). The Case for Animal Rights. In Steven M. Cahn (ed.), Exploring Ethics: An Introductory Anthology. Oxford University Press.score: 90.0
    More than twenty years after its original publication, The Case for Animal Rights is an acknowledged classic of moral philosophy, and its author is recognized as the intellectual leader of the animal rights movement. In a new and fully considered preface, Regan responds to his critics and defends the book's revolutionary position.
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  18. David M. Holt (2008). Unlikely Allies Against Factory Farms: Animal Rights Advocates and Environmentalists. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 25 (2):169-171.score: 90.0
    I examine the risks and opportunities associated with social movement coalition building in attempts to block or curtail the rise of Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) in the United States. As producers have scaled up animal production facilities, environmentalists and animal rights activists, along with numerous other social actors, have begun anti-CAFO campaigns. I argue that while the CAFO has mobilized a diverse group of social actors, these individuals and organizations do not all have the same (...)
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  19. Irina Knopp (2011). United States V Stevens: Gnawing Away at Freedom of Speech or Paving the Way for Animal Rights? [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 24 (3):331-349.score: 90.0
    This article examines United States v. Stevens, a case recently decided by the Supreme Court, and its relation to animal law and freedom of speech issues, specifically the contention between the two, caused by the statute in question at the heart of the case. While animal rights advocates wish to frame the case through an anti-animal cruelty perspective, those seeking to protect freedom of speech have made the statute an issue of First Amendment rights. Is (...)
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  20. Hon-Lam Li & Anthony Yeung (eds.) (2007). New Essays in Applied Ethics: Animal Rights, Personhood and the Ethics of Killing. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 90.0
    This collection of new essays aims to address some of the most perplexing issues arising from death and dying, as well as the moral status of persons and animals. Leading scholars, including Peter Singer and Gerald Dworkin, investigate diverse topics such as animal rights, vegetarianism, lethal injection, abortion and euthanasia.
     
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  21. Ingrid Newkirk (2009). The Peta Practical Guide to Animal Rights: Simple Acts of Kindness to Help Animals in Trouble. St. Martin's Griffin.score: 90.0
    With more than two million members and supporters, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) is the world’s largest animal-rights organization, and its founder and president, Ingrid Newkirk, is one of the most well-known and most effective activists in America. She has spearheaded worldwide efforts to improve the treatment of animals in manufacturing, entertainment, and elsewhere. Every day, in laboratories, food factories, and other industries, animals by the millions are subjected to inhumane cruelty. In this accessible guide, (...)
     
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  22. Mark Rowlands (1998). Animal Rights: A Philosophical Defence. St. Martin's Press.score: 90.0
    The question of the nature and extent of our moral obligations to non-human animals has featured prominently in recent moral debate. This book defends the novel position that a contradictarian moral theory can be used to justify the claim that animals possess a substantial and wide-ranging set of moral rights. Critiquing the rival accounts of Peter Singer and Tom Regan, this study shows how an influential form of the social contract idea can be extended to make sense of the (...)
     
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  23. Mark Rowlands (2009). Animal Rights: Moral Theory and Practice. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 90.0
    Animal rights and moral theories -- Arguing for one's species -- Utilitarianism and animals : Peter Singer's case for animal liberation -- Tom Regan : animal rights as natural rights -- Virtue ethics and animals -- Contractarianism and animal rights -- Animal minds.
     
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  24. Corey Lee Wrenn (2014). Abolition Then and Now: Tactical Comparisons Between the Human Rights Movement and the Modern Nonhuman Animal Rights Movement in the United States. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (2):177-200.score: 90.0
    This article discusses critical comparisons between the human and nonhuman abolitionist movements in the United States. The modern nonhuman abolitionist movement is, in some ways, an extension of the anti-slavery movement of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and the ongoing human Civil Rights movement. As such, there is considerable overlap between the two movements, specifically in the need to simultaneously address property status and oppressive ideology. Despite intentional appropriation of terminology and numerous similarities in mobilization efforts, there has been (...)
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  25. Matteo Mameli & Lisa Bortolotti (2006). Animal Rights, Animal Minds, and Human Mindreading. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (2):84-89.score: 87.0
    Do non-human animals have rights? The answer to this question depends on whether animals have morally relevant mental properties. Mindreading is the human activity of ascribing mental states to other organisms. Current knowledge about the evolution and cognitive structure of mindreading indicates that human ascriptions of mental states to non-human animals are very inaccurate. The accuracy of human mindreading can be improved with the help of scientific studies of animal minds. But the scientific studies by themselves do not (...)
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  26. David Sztybel (2001). Animal Rights: Autonomy and Redundancy. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 14 (3):259-273.score: 84.0
    Even if animal liberation were to be adopted, would rights for animals be redundant – or even deleterious? Such an objection, most prominently voiced by L. W. Sumner and Paul W. Taylor, is misguided, risks an anthropocentric and anthropomorphic conception of autonomy and freedom, overly agent-centered rights conceptions, and an overlooking of the likely harmful consequences of positing rights for humans but not for nonhuman animals. The objection in question also stems from an overly pessimistic construal (...)
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  27. Paola Cavalieri (2001). The Animal Question: Why Nonhuman Animals Deserve Human Rights. Oxford University Press.score: 81.0
    How much do animals matter--morally? Can we keep considering them as second class beings, to be used merely for our benefit? Or, should we offer them some form of moral egalitarianism? Inserting itself into the passionate debate over animal rights, this fascinating, provocative work by renowned scholar Paola Cavalieri advances a radical proposal: that we extend basic human rights to the nonhuman animals we currently treat as "things." Cavalieri first goes back in time, tracing the roots of (...)
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  28. Wesley J. Smith (2009). A Rat is a Pig is a Dog is a Boy: The Human Cost of the Animal Rights Movement. Encounter Books.score: 81.0
    Smith believe that granting "rights" to animals would inevitably diminish human dignity.
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  29. John M. Kistler (2000). Animal Rights: A Subject Guide, Bibliography, and Internet Companion. Greenwood Press.score: 78.0
    Presents an introduction to the subject, suggestions on searching the Internet, and a bibliography of literature on animal nature, fatal and nonfatal uses, ...
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  30. Alejandra Mancilla (2013). Animal Rights with a Grain of Salt. [REVIEW] Society and Animals 21 (3):318-319.score: 76.0
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  31. Corey Lee Wrenn (2013). Resonance of Moral Shocks in Abolitionist Animal Rights Advocacy: Overcoming Contextual Constraints. Society and Animals 21 (4):379-394.score: 76.0
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  32. Erin Evans (2010). Constitutional Inclusion of Animal Rights in Germany and Switzerland: How Did Animal Protection Become an Issue of National Importance? Society and Animals 18 (3):231-250.score: 76.0
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  33. Jamie L. DeLeeuw, Luke W. Galen, Cassandra Aebersold & Victoria Stanton (2007). Support for Animal Rights as a Function of Belief in Evolution, Religious Fundamentalism, and Religious Denomination. Society and Animals 15 (4):353-363.score: 76.0
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  34. Carrie Packwood Freeman (2010). Framing Animal Rights in the “Go Veg” Campaigns of U.S. Animal Rights Organizations. Society and Animals 18 (2):163-182.score: 76.0
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  35. Emily Gaarder (2008). Risk & Reward: The Impact of Animal Rights Activism on Women. Society and Animals 16 (1):1-22.score: 76.0
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  36. Justin R. Goodman & Clinton R. Sanders (2011). In Favor of Tipping the Balance: Animal Rights Activists in Defense of Residential Picketing. Society and Animals 19 (2):137-155.score: 76.0
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  37. Jessica Greenebaum (2009). "I'm Not an Activist!": Animal Rights Vs. Animal Welfare in the Purebred Dog Rescue Movement. Society and Animals 17 (4):289-304.score: 76.0
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  38. Wesley V. Jamison, Caspar Wenk & James V. Parker (2000). Every Sparrow That Falls: Understanding Animal Rights Activism as Functional Religion. Society and Animals 8 (1):305-330.score: 76.0
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  39. Brenda J. Lutz & James M. Lutz (2011). Interest Groups and Pro-Animal Rights Legislation. Society and Animals 19 (3):261-277.score: 76.0
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  40. Nicole R. Pallotta (2008). Origin of Adult Animal Rights Lifestyle in Childhood Responsiveness to Animal Suffering. Society and Animals 16 (2):149-170.score: 76.0
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  41. Caspar Wenk, James Parker & Wesley Jamison (2000). Every Sparrow That Falls: Understanding Animal Rights Activism as Functional Religion. Society and Animals 8 (3):305-330.score: 76.0
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  42. Clinton R. Sanders & Justin R. Goodman (2011). In Favor of Tipping the Balance: Animal Rights Activists in Defense of Residential Picketing. Society and Animals 19 (2):137-155.score: 76.0
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  43. Cassandra Aebersold, Luke Galen, Victoria Stanton & Jamie DeLeeuw (2007). Support for Animal Rights as a Function of Belief in Evolution, Religious Fundamentalism, and Religious Denomination. Society and Animals 15 (4):353-363.score: 76.0
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  44. Christiane Bailey (2013). Zoopolis. A Political Renewal of Animal Rights Theories. Dialogue:1-13.score: 75.0
    Book Panel on Zoopolis including articles by Clare Palmer, Dinesh Wadiwel and Laura Janara and a reply by Donaldson and Kymlicka.
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  45. Mylan Engel (2010). The Philosophy of Animal Rights: A Brief Introduction for Students and Teachers. Lantern Books.score: 75.0
    The book also contains an extensive bibliography of references and philosophical resources.
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  46. Roger Scruton (2000). Animal Rights and Wrongs. Metro in Association with Demos.score: 75.0
    This paperback edition is fully updated with new chapters on the livestoick crisis, fishing and BSE and a layman's guide introduction to philosophical concepts, ...
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  47. Miles Barton (1987). Animal Rights. Gloucester Press.score: 75.0
  48. Marc Bekoff & Carron A. Meaney (eds.) (1998). Encyclopedia of Animal Rights and Animal Welfare. Greenwood Press.score: 75.0
  49. Georges Chapouthier & Jean-Claude Nouët (eds.) (1998). The Universal Declaration of Animal Rights: Comments and Intentions. Ligue Française des Droits De L'Animal.score: 75.0
  50. Patience Coster (2012). Animal Rights. Rosen Central.score: 75.0
     
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