Search results for 'arousal' (try it on Scholar)

339 found
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  1.  8
    C. H. Vanderwolf & T. E. Robinson (1981). Reticulo-Cortical Activity and Behavior: A Critique of the Arousal Theory and a New Synthesis. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (3):459-476.
    It is traditionally believed that cerebral activation (the presence of low voltage fast electrical activity in the neocortex and rhythmical slow activity in the hippocampus) is correlated with arousal, while deactivation (the presence of large amplitude irregular slow waves or spindles in both the neocortex and the hippocampus) is correlated with sleep or coma. However, since there are many exceptions, these generalizations have only limited validity. Activated patterns occur in normal sleep (active or paradoxical sleep) and during states of (...)
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  2. Kim Wallen & Elisabeth A. Lloyd (2011). Female Sexual Arousal: Genital Anatomy and Orgasm in Intercourse. Hormones and Behavior 59:780-792.
    In men and women sexual arousal culminates in orgasm, with female orgasm solely from sexual intercourse often regarded as a unique feature of human sexuality. However, orgasm from sexual intercourse occurs more reliably in men than in women, likely reflecting the different types of physical stimulation men and women require for orgasm. In men, orgasms are under strong selective pressure as orgasms are coupled with ejaculation and thus contribute to male reproductive success. By contrast, women's orgasms in intercourse are (...)
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  3.  6
    Steven Schwartz (1974). Arousal and Recall: Effects of Noise on Two Retrieval Strategies. Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (5):896.
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  4.  4
    Lewis J. Kleinsmith & Stephen Kaplan (1964). Interaction of Arousal and Recall Interval in Nonsense Syllable Paired-Associate Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 67 (2):124.
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  5.  1
    M. Johnna Butter (1970). Differential Recall of Paired Associates as a Function of Arousal and Concreteness-Imagery Levels. Journal of Experimental Psychology 84 (2):252.
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  6.  6
    Peter Suedfeld & P. Bruce Landon (1970). Motivational Arousal and Task Complexity. Journal of Experimental Psychology 83 (2p1):329.
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  7.  1
    Kenneth A. Deffenbacher, Gary J. Platt & Mark A. Williams (1974). Differential Recall as a Function of Socially Induced Arousal and Retention Interval. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (4):809.
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  8.  3
    Eric D. Curton & Daniel S. Lordahl (1974). Effects of Attentional Focus and Arousal on Time Estimation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (5):861.
  9.  3
    D. E. Berlyne, Donna M. Borsa, Jane H. Hamacher & Isolde D. Koenig (1966). Paired-Associate Learning and the Timing of Arousal. Journal of Experimental Psychology 72 (1):1.
  10.  5
    Barbara U. Archer & Robert R. Margolin (1970). Arousal Effects in Intentional Recall and Forgetting. Journal of Experimental Psychology 86 (1):8.
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  11.  3
    Marjorie Powers & V. K. Kumar (1974). Scaling Words on Degree of Arousal and Short- and Long-Term Retention. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (5):1039.
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  12.  3
    Richard G. Stennett (1957). The Relationship of Performance Level to Level of Arousal. Journal of Experimental Psychology 54 (1):54.
  13.  3
    Donna M. Cornsweet (1969). Use of Cues in the Visual Periphery Under Conditions of Arousal. Journal of Experimental Psychology 80 (1):14.
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  14.  3
    A. Steven Frankel (1969). Effects of Arousal on Hierarchically Organized Responses. Journal of Experimental Psychology 82 (2):385.
  15.  1
    Robert Hockey (1973). Changes in Information-Selection Patterns in Multisource Monitoring as a Function of Induced Arousal Shifts. Journal of Experimental Psychology 101 (1):35.
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  16.  2
    Stephen J. Bacon (1974). Arousal and the Range of Cue Utilization. Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (1):81.
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  17.  2
    Wolfgang Schönpflug (1966). Arousal, Adaptation Level, and Accentuation of Judgment. Journal of Experimental Psychology 72 (3):443.
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  18.  1
    Barbara S. Uehling & Robert Sprinkle (1968). Recall of a Serial List as a Function of Arousal and Retention Interval. Journal of Experimental Psychology 78 (1):103.
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  19.  1
    John W. Osborne (1972). Interaction of Arousal and Number of Learning Trials in Paired-Associate Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 95 (1):135.
  20.  1
    John Davis & John Lamberth (1974). Affective Arousal and Energization Properties of Positive and Negative Stimuli. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (2):196.
  21.  1
    Gary W. Patton (1968). Tachistoscopic Recognition Thresholds as a Function of Arousal Level. Journal of Experimental Psychology 78 (2p1):354.
  22. Alvin David, Mark Moore & Dan Rusu (2002). Unconscious Information Processing, Hypnotic Amnesia, and the Misattribution of Arousal: Schachter and Singer's Theory Revised. Journal of Cognitive and Behavioral Psychotherapies 2 (1):23-33.
     
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  23. Gerda Smets (1973). Aesthetic Judgment and Arousal. [Leuven]Leuven University Press.
     
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  24. Roger Whitehead & Scott D. Schliebner (2001). Arousal: Conscious Experience and Brain Mechanisms. In Peter G. Grossenbacher (ed.), Finding Consciousness in the Brain: A Neurocognitive Approach. John Benjamins 187-220.
  25. Thomas S. Smith & Gregory T. Stevens (1996). Emergence, Self-Organization, and Social Interaction: Arousal-Dependent Structure in Social Systems. Sociological Theory 14 (2):131-153.
    The understanding of emergent, self-organizing phenomena has been immensely deepened in recent years on the basis of simulation-based theoretical research. We discuss these new ideas, and illustrate them using examples from several fields. Our discussion serves to introduce equivalent self-organized phenomena in social interaction. Interaction systems appear to be structured partly by virtue of such emergents. These appear under specific conditions: When cognitive buffering is inadequate relative to the levels of stress persons are subjected to, anxiety-spreading has the potential of (...)
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  26.  37
    Larry Cahill & James L. McGaugh (1995). A Novel Demonstration of Enhanced Memory Associated with Emotional Arousal. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (4):410-421.
    The relationship between emotional arousal and long-term memory is addressed in two experiments in which subjects viewed either a relatively emotionally neutral short story or a closely matched but more emotionally arousing story and were tested for retention of the story 2 weeks later. Experiment 1 provides essential replication of the results of Heuer and Reisberg and illustrates the common interpretive problem posed by the use of different stimuli in the neutral versus emotional stories. In Experiment 2, identical slides (...)
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  27. William S. Robinson (2004). Colors, Arousal, Functionalism, and Individual Differences. Psyche 10 (2).
    Some philosophers have regarded the connection between hues and certain arousal or affective qualities as so intimate as to make them inseparable, and this “necessary concomitance view” has been invoked to defend functionalism against arguments based on inverted spectra. Support for the necessary concomitance view has sometimes been thought to accrue from experiments in psychology. This paper examines three experiments, two of which apparently offer support for the view. It argues that careful consideration of these experiments undermines this appearance (...)
     
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  28.  9
    Mara Mather & Matthew Sutherland (2009). Disentangling the Effects of Arousal and Valence on Memory for Intrinsic Details. Emotion Review 1 (2):118-119.
    Kensinger (2009) and Mather (2007) both argue that intrinsic features of emotional items are remembered better than intrinsic features of non-emotional items. However, Kensinger attributes these effects to negative valence whereas Mather attributes them to arousal. In this paper, we note several reasons why arousal may be the driving factor even when a study reveals more detailed memory for negative items than for positive items. We also reanalyze previous data (Mather & Nesmith, 2008) to show that although both (...)
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  29.  3
    Kristy A. Nielson & Mitchell A. Meltzer (2009). Modulation of Long-Term Memory by Arousal in Alexithymia: The Role of Interpretation. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (3):786-793.
    Moderate physiological or emotional arousal induced after learning modulates memory consolidation, helping to distinguish important memories from trivial ones. Yet, the contribution of subjective awareness or interpretation of arousal to this effect is uncertain. Alexithymia, which is an inability to describe or identify one’s emotional and arousal states even though physiological responses to arousal are intact, provides a tool to evaluate the role of arousal interpretation. Participants scoring high and low on alexithymia learned a list (...)
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  30.  4
    A. Morris, A. CleAry & M. Still (2008). The Role of Autonomic Arousal in Feelings of Familiarity. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (4):1378-1385.
    Subjective feelings of familiarity associated with a stimulus tend to be strongest when specific information about the previous encounter with the stimulus is difficult to retrieve . Recognizing: The judgment of previous occurrence. Psychological Review, 87, 252–271.]). When a stimulus has been encountered previously and the circumstances of the encounter cannot be recollected, additional cognitive resources may be directed toward recollection processes; this resource allocation is accompanied by autonomic arousal [Dawson, M. E., Filion, D. L., & Schell, A. M. (...)
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  31.  29
    K. Yarrow, Patrick Haggard & J. Rothwell (2004). Action, Arousal, and Subjective Time. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (2):373-390.
    Saccadic chronostasis refers to the subjective temporal lengthening of the first visual stimulus perceived after an eye movement. It has been quantified using a duration discrimination task. Most models of human duration discrimination hypothesise an internal clock. These models could explain chronostasis as a transient increase in internal clock speed due to arousal following a saccade, leading to temporal overestimation. Two experiments are described which addressed this hypothesis by parametrically varying the duration of the stimuli that are being judged. (...)
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  32.  11
    Mary F. Dallman (2006). Make Love, Not War: Both Serve to Defuse Stress-Induced Arousal Through the Dopaminergic “Pleasure” Network. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):227-228.
    Nell restricts cruelty to hominids, although good evidence suggests that secondary aggression in rodents and particularly primates may be considered cruel. A considerable literature shows that glucocorticoid secretion stimulated by stress facilitates learning, memory, arousal, and aggressive behavior. Either secondary aggression (to a conspecific) or increased affiliative behavior reduces stressor-induced activity, suggesting the reward system can be satisfied by other behaviors than cruelty.
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  33.  14
    Jenefer Robinson (2013). Three Theories of Emotion—Three Routes for Musical Arousal. In Tom Cochrane, Bernardino Fantini & Klaus R. Scherer (eds.), The Emotional Power of Music: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Musical Arousal, Expression, and Social Control. OUP Oxford 155.
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  34.  36
    Jamie Dow (2007). A Supposed Contradiction About Emotion-Arousal in Aristotle's "Rhetoric". Phronesis 52 (4):382 - 402.
    Aristotle, in the Rhetoric, appears to claim both that emotion-arousal has no place in the essential core of rhetorical expertise and that it has an extremely important place as one of three technical kinds of proof. This paper offers an account of how this apparent contradiction can be resolved. The resolution stems from a new understanding of what Rhetoric I. I refers to - not emotions, but set-piece rhetorical devices aimed at manipulating emotions, which do not depend on the (...)
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  35.  10
    Lee Ellis (1995). Extending Arousal Theory and Reflecting on Biosocial Approaches to Social Science. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (3):554-554.
    This commentary extends arousal theory to suggest an explanation for the well-established inverse correlation between church attendance and involvement in crime. In addition, the results of two surveys of social scientists are reviewed to reveal just how little impact the biosocial/sociobiological perspective has had thus far on social science.
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  36.  7
    R. J. R. Blair (2011). Should Affective Arousal Be Grounded in Perception-Action Coupling? Emotion Review 3 (1):109-110.
    Decety (2011) considers the cognitive neuroscience of empathy and, in particular, his three-component model of empathic responding. His position is highly influential with its emotional awareness/understanding and emotional regulation components representing clear extensions of previous theorizing on empathy. In this brief commentary, I will critically consider the third of his components: affective arousal. In particular, I will consider the implications of the literature to the proposed computations, based on perception—action coupling, that underlie this component of his model. I will (...)
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  37.  16
    L. Cosand, T. Cavanagh, A. Brown, C. Courtney, A. Rissling, A. Schell & M. Dawson (2008). Arousal, Working Memory, and Conscious Awareness in Contingency Learning☆. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (4):1105-1113.
    There are wide individual differences in the ability to detect a stimulus contingency embedded in a complex paradigm. The present study used a cognitive masking paradigm to better understand individual differences related to contingency learning. Participants were assessed on measures of electrodermal arousal and on working memory capacity before engaging in the contingency learning task. Contingency awareness was assessed both by trial-by-trial verbal reports obtained during the task and by a short post-task recognition questionnaire. Participants who became aware had (...)
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  38.  1
    Derek Matravers, Arousal Theories.
    This survey article looks at various arousal theories which aim to illuminate the connection between music and the emotions.
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  39.  4
    Heather Hoffmann, Kathryn Peterson & Hana Garner (2012). Field Conditioning of Sexual Arousal in Humans. Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology 2.
    Background: Human sexual classical conditioning effects are less robust compared with those obtained in other animals. The artificiality of the laboratory environment and/or the unconditioned stimulus (US) used (e.g. watching erotic film clips as opposed to participating in sexual activity) may contribute to this discrepancy. The present experiment used a field study design to explore the conditioning of human sexual arousal. Method: Seven heterosexual couples were instructed to include a novel, neutrally preferred scent as the conditioned stimulus (CS+) during (...)
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  40.  4
    Adrian Raine (1995). Psychopathy and Violence: Arousal, Temperament, Birth Complications, Maternal Rejection, and Prefrontal Dysfunction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (3):571-573.
    The key questions arising from Mealey's analysis are: Do environmental factors such as early maternal rejection also contribute to the emotional deficits observed in psychopaths? Are there psychophysiological protective factors for antisocial behavior that have clinical implications? Does a disinhibited temperament and low arousal predispose to primary psychopathy? Would primary or secondary psychopaths be most characterized by prefrontal dysfunction?
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  41.  4
    Holger Ursin (2000). Emotions and Reward – but No Arousal? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (2):217-218.
    This commentary argues for the inclusion of the neurophysiological arousal concept to help understanding the brain mechanisms of emotions and reward and the cognitive mechanisms involved.
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  42. Robert E. Thayer (1990). The Biopsychology of Mood and Arousal. Oxford University Press Usa.
    What is the biological function of daily mood variations? What is the relationship between mood and such factors as exercise, time of day, nutrition, stress, and illness? Drawing on his own wide-ranging research concerning subjective assessments of mood and on extensive research by others, Dr. Thayer presents a comprehensive theory of normal mood states, viewing them as subjective components of two biological arousal systems, one which people find energizing, and the other which people describe as producing tension. The author (...)
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  43.  1
    Ruth S. Ogden, David Moore, Leanne Redfern & Francis McGlone (2015). The Effect of Pain and the Anticipation of Pain on Temporal Perception: A Role for Attention and Arousal. Cognition and Emotion 29 (5):910-922.
  44.  3
    Daniel Lundqvist, Pernilla Juth & Arne Öhman (2014). Using Facial Emotional Stimuli in Visual Search Experiments: The Arousal Factor Explains Contradictory Results. Cognition and Emotion 28 (6):1012-1029.
  45.  7
    Sandrine Gil & Sylvie Droit-Volet (2012). Emotional Time Distortions: The Fundamental Role of Arousal. Cognition and Emotion 26 (5):847-862.
  46.  4
    Bertram Gawronski & Derek G. V. Mitchell (2014). Simultaneous Conditioning of Valence and Arousal. Cognition and Emotion 28 (4):577-595.
  47.  16
    Lisa Feldman Barrett (1998). Discrete Emotions or Dimensions? The Role of Valence Focus and Arousal Focus. Cognition and Emotion 12 (4):579-599.
  48. A. R. Luria & E. D. Homskaya (1970). Frontal Lobes and the Regulation of Arousal Processes. In D. Mostofsky (ed.), Attention: Contemporary Theory and Analysis. Appleton-Century-Crofts 303--330.
     
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  49. Eugene R. Delay & Walter Isaac (1983). Age and Arousal in the Rat. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 21 (4):294-296.
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  50.  26
    J. S. Adelman & Z. Estes (2013). Emotion and Memory: A Recognition Advantage for Positive and Negative Words Independent of Arousal. Cognition 129 (3):530-535.
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