Search results for 'atomism, Aristotle' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John King-Farlow (1985). Facts, Agency and Aristotle's “Is”: Logical Atomism in Early Metaphysics? Metaphilosophy 16 (2‐3):166-177.score: 120.0
  2. David J. Furley (1976). Aristotle and the Atomists on Motion in a Void. In Peter K. Machamer & Robert G. Turnbull (eds.), Motion and Time, Space and Matter. Ohio State University Press. 83--100.score: 120.0
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  3. D. Kahn (2001). Between Atomism, Alchemiy and Theology: Reception of Antoine de Villon's and Etienne de Clave's Refutation of Aristotle, Paracelsus and the Cabalists (August 24-25, 1624). [REVIEW] Annals of Science 58 (3):241-286.score: 120.0
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  4. David J. Furley (1967). Two Studies in the Greek Atomists: Study I, Indivisible Magnitudes; Study Ii, Aristotle and Epicurus on Voluntary Action. Princeton, N.J.,Princeton University Press.score: 72.0
  5. Travis Dumsday (2014). Some Ontological Consequences of Atomism. Ratio 27 (3).score: 54.0
    Is there a fundamental layer of objects in nature? And if so what sorts of things populate it? Among those who answer ‘yes’ to the first question, a common answer to the second is ‘atoms,’ where an atom is understood in the original sense of an object that is spatially unextended, indivisible, and wholly lacking in proper parts (whether actual or potential). Here I explore some of the ontological consequences of atomism. First, if atoms are real, then whatever motion they (...)
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  6. Lukáš Novák (2009). Conceptual Atomism, “Aporia Generis” and a Way Out for Leibniz and the Aristotelians. Studia Neoaristotelica 6 (1):15-49.score: 54.0
    De modo, quo Leibniz et Aristotelici aporiam generis solvere possunt, doctrina de conceptibus simpliciter simplicibus non respuendaDoctrina de conceptibus simpliciter simplicibus, in quos omnes notiones ultimatim possunt resolvi, (a recentioribus “atomismus conceptualis” vocata) firmiter irradicata est in occidentali philosophica traditione. Originem suam quidem ab Aristotele trahens semper apud peripateticos adfuit, purissime tamen expressa in operibus Leibnitii invenitur. Nihilominus, ab initio haec doctrina etiam difficultate quadam patiebatur, quae “aporia generis” vulgo dicitur. Difficillime est enim explicatu, quomodo simplicitas absoluta conceptuum primitivorum (seu (...)
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  7. Lindsay Judson (ed.) (1995). Aristotle's Physics: A Collection of Essays. Clarendon Press.score: 54.0
    The Physics is one of Aristotle's masterpieces - a work of extraordinary intellectual power which has had a profound influence on the development of metaphysics and the philosophy of science, as well as on the development of physics itself. This collection of ten new essays by leading Aristotelian scholars examines a wide range of issues in the Physics and related works, including method, causation and explanation, chance, teleology, the infinite, the nature of time, the critique of atomism, the role (...)
     
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  8. William Newman (2009). The Significance of "Chymical Atomism". Early Science and Medicine 14 (1):248-264.score: 42.0
  9. Fred D. Miller (1982). Aristotle Against the Atomists. In Norman Kretzmann (ed.), Infinity and Continuity in Ancient and Medieval Thought. Cornell University Press. 87--111.score: 40.0
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  10. James F. Ross, The Fate of the Analysts: Aristotle's Revenge*: Software Everywhere.score: 36.0
    SUMMARY: If you think of analytic philosophy as disciplined argumentation, but with distinctive doctrinal commitments [to: positivism, logical atomism, ideal languages, verificationism, physicalistic reductionism, materialism, functionalism, connectivism, computational accounts of perception, and inductive accounts of language learning], then THAT analytic philosophy is fast going the way of acid rock and the plastic LP. Not because the method has betrayed the doctrines. Rather, the doctrines disintegrate under the method.
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  11. Devin Henry (forthcoming). The Failure of Evolution in Antiquity. In Georgia Irby (ed.), Blackwell Companion to Ancient Science, Medicine and Technology. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 36.0
    The intellectual history of evolutionary theory really does not begin in earnest until the late seventeenth/early eighteenth century. Prior to that, the idea that species might have evolved over time was not a serious possibility for most naturalists and philosophers. There is certainly no substantive debate in antiquity about evolution in the modern sense. There were really only two competing explanations for how living things came to have the parts they do: design or blind chance. Ancient Greek Atomism, for example, (...)
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  12. John E. Murdoch (2009). Beyond Aristotle : Indivisibles and Infinite Divisibility in the Later Middle Ages. In Christophe Grellard & Aurélien Robert (eds.), Atomism in Late Medieval Philosophy and Theology. Brill. 9--15.score: 36.0
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  13. Joachim Schummer (2004). Editorial: Substances Versus Reactions. Hyle 10 (1):3 - 4.score: 24.0
    Is chemistry primarily about things or about processes, about chemical substances or about chemical reactions? Is a chemical reaction defined by the change of certain substances, or are substances defined by their characteristic chemical reactions? What appears to be a play on words to the modern scientist, is actually one of the most fundamental ontological question since antiquity, prompted by the most radical change – the chemical change or the ‘coming-to-be and passing-away’ as Aristotle’s treatise on theoretical chemistry came (...)
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  14. Malcolm Schofield (2002). Leucippus, Democritus and the Οὐ Μα̑λλον Principle: An Examination of Theophrastus "Phys. Op." Fr. 8. Phronesis 47 (3):253 - 263.score: 24.0
    This paper is a piece of detective work. Starting from an obvious excrescence in the transmitted text of Simplicius's treatment of the foundations of Presocratic atomism near the beginning of his "Physics" commentary, it excavates a Theophrastean correction to Aristotle's tendency to lump Leucippus and Democritus together: Theophrastus made application of the οὐ μ[unrepresentable symbol]λλον principle in the sphere of ontology an innovation by Democritus. Along the way it shows Simplicius reordering his Theophrastean source in his efforts to find (...)
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  15. Malcolm Schofield (2002). Leucippus, Democritus and the Oυ Μαλλoν Principle: An Examination of Theophrastus Phys.Op. Fr. 8. Phronesis 47 (3):253-263.score: 24.0
    This paper is a piece of detective work. Starting from an obvious excrescence in the transmitted text of Simplicius's treatment of the foundations of Presocratic atomism near the beginning of his "Physics" commentary, it excavates a Theophrastean correction to Aristotle's tendency to lump Leucippus and Democritus together: Theophrastus made application of the οὐ μ[unrepresentable symbol]λλον principle in the sphere of ontology an innovation by Democritus. Along the way it shows Simplicius reordering his Theophrastean source in his efforts to find (...)
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  16. Miriam C. D. Peixoto (2011). L'activité de l'âme démocritéenne. Chôra 9:217-242.score: 24.0
    The thought of the ancient atomists about the activity of the soul in the body is an important chapter in the history of reflection on the soul in ancient philosophy. A review of testimonies and fragments attributed to Democritus of Abdera shows its singular conception of the soul as a complex network of transactions through which it exercises, inside compound bodies, its role in driving principle of beings animated. These texts show the tension and dynamism that characterize the activity of (...)
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  17. Paul Needham (2006). Substance and Modality. Philosophy of Science 73 (5):829-840.score: 24.0
    The Aristotelian distinction between actual and potential presence of a substance in a mixture forms part of a conception of mixture which stands in contrast to atomist and Stoic theories as propounded by the ancients. But the central ideas on which these theories are built need not be combined and opposed to one another in precisely the ways envisaged by these ancient theories. This is well illustrated by Duhem, who maintained the Aristotelian idea that the original ingredients are only potentially, (...)
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  18. John Henry (2011). A Short History of Scientific Thought. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 24.0
    Machine generated contents note: -- Introduction -- Setting the Scene -- Plato and Aristotle -- From the Roman Empire to the Empire of Islam -- The Western Middle Ages -- The Renaissance -- New Methods of Science -- Bringing Mathematics and Natural Philosophy Together -- Practice and Theory in Renaissance Medicine: William Harvey and the Circulation of the Blood -- The Spirit of System: Rene; Descartes and the Mechanical Philosophy -- The Royal Society and Experimental Philosophy -- Experiment, Mathematics, (...)
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  19. Barry Smith (2001). Objects and Their Environments: From Aristotle to Ecological Ontology. In The Life and Motion of Socio-Economic Units. Taylor and Francis.score: 18.0
    What follows is a contribution to the theory of space and of spatial objects. It takes as its starting point the philosophical subfield of ontology, which can be defined as the science of what is: of the various types and categories of objects and relations in all realms of being. More specifically, it begins with ideas set forth by Aristotle in his Categories and Metaphysics, two works which constitute the first great contributions to ontological science. Because Aristotle’s ontological (...)
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  20. Achille Varzi, Mereology.score: 8.0
    Mereology (from the Greek μερος, ‘part’) is the theory of parthood relations: of the relations of part to whole and the relations of part to part within a whole. Its roots can be traced back to the early days of philosophy, beginning with the Presocratic atomists and continuing throughout the writings of Plato (especially the Parmenides and the Thaetetus), Aristotle (especially the Metaphysics, but also the Physics, the Topics, and De partibus animalium ), and Boethius (especially In Ciceronis Topica (...)
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  21. Keimpe Algra (1995). Concepts of Space in Greek Thought. E.J. Brill.score: 8.0
    This book provides detailed information about the theories of place and space of the ancient atomists, Plato, Aristotle, Peripatetics, Stoics and others, about ...
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  22. C. C. W. Taylor (ed.) (1998). Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy: Volume XVI, 1998. Clarendon Press.score: 8.0
    Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy is an annual volume of original articles, which may be of substantial length, on a wide range of topics in ancient philosophy, and review articles of major books. The 1998 volume is broad in scope, as ever, featuring four pieces on Aristotle, two on Plato, and one each on Xenophanes, the Atomists, and Plutarch. -/- 'An excellent periodical.' Mary Margaret MacKenzie, Times Literary Supplement -/- 'This ... annual collection ... has become standard reading among (...)
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  23. Evelina Domnitch & Dmitry Gelfand (2011). Hydrogeny. Continent 1 (3):156-157.score: 8.0
    Nature's simplest atom and mother of all matter, hydrogen feeds the stars as well as interlaces the molecules of their biological descendants – to whom it ultimately whispers the secrets of quantum reality. Hydrogen’s most prevalent earthly guise lies within the composition of water. A slight electrical disturbance can split water into hydrogen and oxygen gas, resulting in diaphanous bubble clouds slowly rising towards the liquid’s surface. Though the founding fathers of electrochemistry posited that the mass of liberated bubbles is (...)
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  24. Jan Bigaj (2012). Rola negacji w opisie świata według arystotelesowskiej Metafizyki. ARGUMENT 2 (2):265 - 291.score: 8.0
    The Role of Negation in the Description of the World According to Aristote’s Metaphysics. The notions of ‘being’ and ‘non-being’ have entered philosophical language, forming the basis of ontology and meontology, as the counterparts of the Greek expressions to on and to me on (nominalised forms, affirmative and negative, of the participle of the verb einai). Originally, however, these expressions did not have any objectifying meaning, but played the role of meta-language names, representing the copula einai in all its forms, (...)
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  25. Marcelino Rodríguez Donis (1997). Azar, Naturaleza y Arte En Los Atomistas y En Platón. Anuario Filosófico 30 (57):21-70.score: 8.0
    This paper aims to analyze the idea of randomness in Greek philo-sophy since Empedocle to Plato to show determinism as unavoidable companion of most deterministic doctrines. Despite their adherence to determinism, even Plato and Aristotle introduce randomness to account for the various forms of reality, following so Empedocle and the atomists. There are as many contentions for randomness as for necessity in Greek and Latin thought.
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