Search results for 'attachments' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  9
    Dan Lainer-Vos (2012). Manufacturing National Attachments: Gift-Giving, Market Exchange and the Construction of Irish and Zionist Diaspora Bonds. Theory and Society 41 (1):73-106.
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  2.  90
    Bart van Leeuwen (2007). A Formal Recognition of Social Attachments: Expanding Axel Honneth's Theory of Recognition. Inquiry 50 (2):180 – 205.
    Axel Honneth draws a distinction between three types of recognition: (1) love, (2) respect and (3) social esteem. In his The Struggle for Recognition, the recognition of cultural particularity is situated in the third sphere. It will here be argued that the logic of recognition of cultural identity also demands a non-evaluative recognition, namely a respect for difference. Difference-respect is formal because it is a recognition of the value of a particular culture not "for society" or "as such", but for (...)
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  3.  20
    Bart van Leeuwen (2006). Social Attachments as Conditions for the Condition of the Good Life? A Critique of Will Kymlicka's Moral Monism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 32 (3):401-428.
    The moral justification of Will Kymlicka's theory of minority rights is unconvincing. According to Kymlicka, cultural embeddedness is a necessary condition for personal autonomy (which is, in turn, the precondition for the good life) and for that reason liberals should be concerned about culture. I will criticize this instrumentalism of social attachments and the moral monism behind it. On the basis of a modification of Axel Honneth's theory of recognition, I will reject the false opposition between the instrumental value (...)
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  4.  12
    Anthony Cunningham (1999). Kantian Ethics and Intimate Attachments. American Philosophical Quarterly 36 (4):279 - 294.
    This essay questions whether recent attempts to reconcile Kantian ethics and intimate attachments can be successful. Defenders have argued that Kantian commitments would leave enough room to pursue the sorts of intimate attachments that provide so much of the meaning and structures of most lives. However, close attention to the letter and spirit of Kant's ethics suggests that imperfect duties would demand far more of conscientious Kantians than defenders have acknowledged. The duties to prevent injustice and alleviate suffering (...)
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  5.  16
    Margaret Moore (2013). Place-Related Attachments and Global Distributive Justice. Journal of Global Ethics 9 (2):215 - 226.
    This paper is interested in place-related attachments. It discusses the way in which territory or land is treated in theories of global distributive justice, and argues that this fails to capture the normatively significant relationship between peoples and places. This paper argues that any adequate theory of justice in territory has to begin by recognizing that territory is a claimant-relative good, and that this should be an important point of departure for theorizing about land and justice. Not only do (...)
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  6.  14
    Katerina Zabrodska & Constance Ellwood (2011). Subjectivity as a Play of Territorialization: Exploring Affective Attachments to Place Through Collective Biography. Human Affairs 21 (2):184-195.
    In this paper the authors seek to contribute to a new ontology of an embodied, desiring subject through an exploration of their own subjectivities and of the ways in which subjectivities are produced and transformed through affective attachments to place. Using the method of collective biography and drawing on Deleuze and Guattari’s concepts of desire and territorialization they examine their affective responses and attachments to place: Australia and the Czech Republic. As a point of departure for their analysis, (...)
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  7. Arthur Fine (1986). Unnatural Attitudes: Realist and Instrumentalist Attachments to Science. Mind 95 (378):149-179.
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  8.  10
    Emmanuelle Cheyns (2014). Making “Minority Voices” Heard in Transnational Roundtables: The Role of Local NGOs in Reintroducing Justice and Attachments. Agriculture and Human Values 31 (3):439-453.
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  9.  5
    Christoph Scheepers (2003). Syntactic Priming of Relative Clause Attachments: Persistence of Structural Configuration in Sentence Production. Cognition 89 (3):179-205.
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  10. Wendy Brown (1993). Wounded Attachments. Political Theory 21 (3):390-410.
  11. Raffaele Rodogno (2014). Chapter Six. Attachments and the Moral Psychology of Value Conflicts. In Jesper Garsdal & Johanna Seibt (eds.), How is Global Dialogue Possible?: Foundational Reseach on Value Conflicts and Perspectives for Global Policy. De Gruyter 129-142.
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  12.  21
    Lynn A. Jansen (2004). Child Organ Donation, Family Autonomy, and Intimate Attachments. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 13 (2):133-142.
    What standard or principle should guide decisionmaking concerning the permissibility of allowing children to be organ donors? For a long time, it has been widely assumed that the best interest of the child is the appropriate standard. But recently, several critics have charged that this standard fails to give due weight to the interests of the family and the intimate relationships that the family makes possible.1,2 This article reviews and rejects both the best-interest standard and the alternative standard recommended by (...)
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  13. Jane Bennett & Wendy Brown (2003). The Enchantment of Modern Life: Attachments, Crossings, and Ethics. Political Theory 31 (3):461-470.
     
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  14.  30
    Marianne Moyaert (2010). Interreligious Dialogue and the Value of Openness; Taking the Vulnerability of Religious Attachments Into Account. Heythrop Journal 51 (5):730-740.
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  15.  17
    Stanley Bates (2002). Review of Jane Bennett, The Enchantment of Modern Life: Attachments, Crossings, and Ethics. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (2).
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  16.  15
    Brice Erickson (2010). Syme Viannou (P.) Muhly The Sanctuary of Hermes and Aphrodite at Syme Viannou IV. Animal Images of Clay. Handmade Figurines; Attachments; Mouldmade Plaques. With a Contribution by Eleni Nodarou and Christina Rathossi. (Library of the Archaeological Society at Athens 256.) Pp. Xxii + 214, Ills, B/W & Colour Pls. Athens: Archaeological Society at Athens, 2008. Paper. ISBN: 978-960-8145-71-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 60 (02):553-555.
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  17. Raymond D. Boisvert (2002). Jane Bennett, The Enchantment of Modern Life: Attachments, Crossings, and Ethics Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 22 (4):249-251.
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  18.  5
    Rey Chow (2001). Fateful Attachments: On Collecting, Fidelity, and Lao She. Critical Inquiry 28 (1):286-304.
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  19. W. Brown (1993). Wounded Attachments. Political Theory 21 (3):390-410.
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  20. Jane Bennett (forthcoming). The Enchantment of Modern Life: Attachments, Crossings. Ethics.
     
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  21.  3
    Irene N. H. Harwood, Walter Stone & Malcolm Pines (eds.) (2012). Self Experiences in Group, Revisited: Affective Attachments, Intersubjective Regulations, and Human Understanding. Routledge.
    Since the publication of Self Experiences in Groupin 1998-the first book to apply self psychology and intersubjectivity to group work-there have been tremendous advancements in the areas of affect, attachment, infant research, ...
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  22. Jeremy Holmes (2016). Attachments: Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, Psychoanalysis: The Selected Works of Jeremy Holmes. Routledge.
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  23. B. Van Leeuwen (2006). Social Attachments as Conditions for the Condition of the Good Life? Philosophy and Social Criticism 32 (3):401-28.
     
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  24. Katharine Wolfe (2016). Together in Need: Relational Selfhood, Vulnerability to Harm, and Enriching Attachments. Southern Journal of Philosophy 54 (1):129-148.
    Connections between one's own welfare and that of others abound if we pause to look for them, although philosophical theories of selfhood have only very recently begun to incorporate these connections. This essay draws on recent work on need to argue that one of the strongest expressions of these connections is to be found in the relational needs that they can generate. While paying heed to needs that arise from the relational nature of selfhood at large, this essay pays particular (...)
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  25. Joseph Raz (2001). Value, Respect, and Attachment. Cambridge University Press.
    The book is a contribution to the study of values, as they affect both our personal and our public life. It defends the view that values are necessarily universal, on the ground that that is a condition of their intelligibility. It does, however, reject most common conceptions of universality, like those embodied in the writings on human rights. It aims to reconcile the universality of value with (a) the social dependence of value and (b) the centrality to our life of (...)
     
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  26. Diana Sartori (2012). La politica fuori dalla storia della politica. Scienza and Politica. Per Una Storia Delle Dottrine 24 (46).
    Wendy Brown’s approach in Politics out of History is characterized by an attempt to analyze the presence of the past which can be read not only under the light of Nietzsche’s legacy, but also through a comparison with Hannah Arendt’s conception of the gap between the past and the future. Like Arendt, Brown aims to look at the present as the site of politics and freedom, even though the former conceives the break with tradition as the unavoidable starting point, while (...)
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  27.  4
    Niels Christian Nickelsen (2010). Rethinking Interventionist Research: Navigating Oppositional Networks in a Danish Hospital. Journal of Research Practice 5 (2):Article M4.
    This article reports on a researcher's experience of being invited to improve upon an organisational situation in a hospital in Denmark. Being engaged with different networks of participants in the organisational situation, the researcher found himself wrapped up in various agendas, with different sections of the staff trying to persuade him to support their own respective interests. The article theorises these persuasions as "seductions." Consequently, the task of the researcher involves selecting, prioritising, and working upon his connections with various networks, (...)
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  28.  2
    Paul O'Leary (1993). Ethical Attentiveness. Studies in Philosophy and Education 12 (2-4):139-151.
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  29. Simon Blackburn (1993). Essays in Quasi-Realism. Oxford University Press.
    This volume collects some influential essays in which Simon Blackburn, one of our leading philosophers, explores one of the most profound and fertile of philosophical problems: the way in which our judgments relate to the world. This debate has centered on realism, or the view that what we say is validated by the way things stand in the world, and a variety of oppositions to it. Prominent among the latter are expressive and projective theories, but also a relaxed pluralism that (...)
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  30. Ian Hunter (2006). The History of Theory. Critical Inquiry 33 (1):78-112.
    Do you see now why it feels so good to be a critical mind? Why critique, this most ambiguous pharmakon, has become such a potent euphoric drug? You are always right! When naïve believers are clinging forcefully to their objects... you can turn all of those attachments into so many fetishes and humiliate all the believers by showing that it is nothing but their own projection, that you, yes you alone, can see. But as soon as naïve believers are (...)
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  31.  97
    Paul Guyer (1993). Kant and the Experience of Freedom: Essays on Aesthetics and Morality. Cambridge University Press.
    This collection of essays by one of the preeminent Kant scholars of our time transforms our understanding of both Kant's aesthetics and his ethics. Guyer shows that at the very core of Kant's aesthetic theory, disinterestedness of taste becomes an experience of freedom and thus an essential accompaniment to morality itself. At the same time he reveals how Kant's moral theory includes a distinctive place for the cultivation of both general moral sentiments and particular attachments on the basis of (...)
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  32. Carol D. Raupp (1999). Treasuring, Trashing or Terrorizing: Adult Outcomes of Childhood Socialization About Companion Animals. Society and Animals 7 (2):141-159.
    Being hit or being given away are subabusive, common behaviors that harm companion animals. Violent childhood socialization increases the risk of adult abuse of animal companions, but relatively little is known about the origins of societally tolerated maltreatment of pets by adults. University students completed surveys about general attitudes toward animals, family socializaton, and current relationships with pets. These students generally had positive childhood socialization about pets and reported high levels of current attachment. Adults whose parents had given children's companion (...)
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  33. Philip Pettit (2015). The Robust Demands of the Good: Ethics with Attachment, Virtue, and Respect. OUP Oxford.
    Philip Pettit offers a new insight into moral psychology. He shows that attachments such as love, and certain virtues such as honesty, require their characteristic behaviours not only as things actually are, but also in cases where things are different from how they actually are. He explores the implications of this idea for key moral issues.
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  34. Jessica Wolfendale (2007). My Avatar, My Self: Virtual Harm and Attachment. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 9 (2):111-119.
    Multi-user online environments involve millions of participants world-wide. In these online communities participants can use their online personas – avatars – to chat, fight, make friends, have sex, kill monsters and even get married. Unfortunately participants can also use their avatars to stalk, kill, sexually assault, steal from and torture each other. Despite attempts to minimise the likelihood of interpersonal virtual harm, programmers cannot remove all possibility of online deviant behaviour. Participants are often greatly distressed when their avatars are harmed (...)
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  35.  23
    R. Jay Wallace (2013). The View From Here: On Affirmation, Attachment, and the Limits of Regret. OUP Usa.
    The View from Here is a study of our must fundamental attitudes toward the past. The book explores the dynamics of affirmation and regret, tracing the connections of each to our ongoing attachments. The focus is on situations in which our attachments commit us to affirming events or decisions that we know to have been unfortunate or regrettable.
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  36.  7
    Frederic Schick (1997). Making Choices: A Recasting of Decision Theory. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a unique introductory overview of decision theory. It is completely non-technical, without a single formula in the book. Written in a crisp and clear style it succinctly covers the full range of philosophical issues of rationality and decision theory, including game theory, social choice theory, prisoner's dilemma and much else. The book aims to expand the scope and enrich the foundations of decision theory. By addressing such issues as ambivalence, inner conflict, and the constraints imposed upon us (...)
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  37.  6
    Katherine Tullmann (forthcoming). Sympathy & Fascination. British Journal of Aesthetics:ayw003.
    Why do we form strong emotional attachments to unlikeable and immoral characters during our engagements with fictions? These pro-attitudes persist even as we realize that we would loathe these people if we were to encounter them in real-life. In this paper, I explore the implications of the sympathy for the devil phenomenon. I begin by considering several popular explanations, including simulation, aesthetic distancing, pre-focusing, and the ‘best of all characters’. I conclude that each one is inadequate. I then propose (...)
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  38.  21
    Nick Riggle (2015). On the Aesthetic Ideal. British Journal of Aesthetics 55 (4):433-447.
    How should we pursue aesthetic value, or incorporate it into our lives, if we want to? Is there an ideal of aesthetic life? Philosophers have proposed numerous answers to the analogous question in moral philosophy, but the aesthetic question has received relatively little attention. There is, in essence, a single view, which is that one should develop a sensibility that would give one sweeping access to aesthetic value. I challenge this view on two grounds. First, it threatens to undermine our (...)
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  39.  1
    Davina Cooper & Didi Herman (2013). Up Against the Property Logic of Equality Law: Conservative Christian Accommodation Claims and Gay Rights. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 21 (1):61-80.
    This paper explores conservative Christian demands that religious-based objections to providing services to lesbians and gay men should be accommodated by employers and public bodies. Focusing on a series of court judgments, alongside commentators’ critical accounts, the paper explores the dominant interpretation of the conflict as one involving two groups with deeply held, competing interests, and suggests this interpretation can be understood through a social property framework. The paper explores how religious beliefs and sexual orientation are attachments whose power (...)
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  40.  38
    Paul Richard Blum, Cultivating Talents and Social Responsibility. Https://Inside.Loyola.Edu/Teams/Peace_and_justice_studies/Lists/Team%20Discussion/Attachments/1/Blum %20cultivating%20talents%20revised.Pdf.
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  41.  3
    Katherine Tullmann (2016). Sympathy and Fascination. British Journal of Aesthetics 56 (2):115-129.
    Why do we form strong emotional attachments to unlikeable and immoral characters during our engagements with fictions? These pro-attitudes persist even as we realize that we would loathe these people if we were to encounter them in real-life. In this paper, I explore the implications of the sympathy for the devil phenomenon. I begin by considering several popular explanations, including simulation, aesthetic distancing, pre-focusing, and the ‘best of all characters’. I conclude that each one is inadequate. I then propose (...)
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  42. Bruce D. Perry (2002). Childhood Experience and the Expression of Genetic Potential: What Childhood Neglect Tells Us About Nature and Nurture. [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 3 (1):79-100.
    Studies of childhood abuse and neglect haveimportant lessons for considerations of natureand nurture. While each child has uniquegenetic potentials, both human and animalstudies point to important needs that everychild has, and severe long-term consequencesfor brain function if those needs are not met. The effects of the childhood environment,favorable or unfavorable, interact with all theprocesses of neurodevelopment (neurogenesis,migration, differentiation, apoptosis,arborization, synaptogenesis, synapticsculpting, and myelination). The time coursesof all these neural processes are reviewed herealong with statements of core principles forboth genetic and (...)
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  43.  5
    David Campbell (2001). Conviction Seeking Efficacy: Sustainable Agriculture and the Politics of Co-Optation. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 18 (4):353-363.
    Proponents of sustainable agriculture seek deeply rooted social changes, but to advance this agenda requires political credibility and work with diverse partners. Asthe literature on political co-optation makesclear, the tension between conviction andcredibility is persistent and unavoidable; nota problem to be solved so much as a built-incondition of movement politics. Drawing on acase history of California's largestsustainable agriculture organization, astructural assessment is made of the strategicchoices facing movement leaders, organizationaltensions that accompany these choices, andperceived gains and losses. The case historydemonstrates (...)
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  44.  93
    Dirk Baltzly, Stoicism. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Stoicism was one of the new philosophical movements of the Hellenistic period. The name derives from the porch (stoa poikilê) in the Agora at Athens decorated with mural paintings, where the members of the school congregated, and their lectures were held. Unlike ‘epicurean,’ the sense of the English adjective ‘stoical’ is not utterly misleading with regard to its philosophical origins. The Stoics did, in fact, hold that emotions like fear or envy (or impassioned sexual attachments, or passionate love of (...)
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  45. Michael Locke McLendon (2014). Rousseau and the Minimal Self: A Solution to the Problem of Amour-Propre. European Journal of Political Theory 13 (3):341-361.
    Over the past few decades, scholars have reassessed the role of amour-propre in Rousseau’s thought. While it was once believed that he had an entirely negative valuation of the emotion, it is now widely held that he finds it useful and employs it to strengthen moral attachments, conjugal love, civic virtue and moral heroism. At the same time, scholars are divided as to whether this positive amour-propre is an antidote to the negative or dangerous form. Some scholars are confident (...)
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  46. David Wiggins (1991). Categorical Requirements: Kant and Hume on the Idea of Duty. The Monist 74 (1):83-106.
    If the theory advanced below is correct, then what is the difference (I know she [Philippa Foot]] will ask) between the moral must/must not and the must/must not of etiquette or the clubhouse? Looking forward to the conclusion I shall reach, let me reply, roughly and readily, that the difference will reside not in anything formal but in the depth, spread, and felt authority of the attachments to which the moral must/must not appeals-and categorically appeals.
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  47.  7
    Sara Ahmed (2004). Collective Feelings: Or, the Impressions Left by Others. Theory, Culture and Society 21 (2):25-42.
    This article examines ‘collective feelings’ by considering how ‘others’ create impressions on the surfaces of bodies. Rather than considering ‘collective feeling’ as ‘fellow feeling’ or in terms of feeling ‘for’ the collective, the article suggests that how we respond to others in intercorporeal encounters creates the impression of a collective body. In other words, how we feel about others is what aligns us with a collective, which paradoxically ‘takes shape’ only as an effect of such alignments. The article considers different (...)
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  48.  15
    M. Preston-Shoot & J. McKimm (2010). Prepared for Practice? Law Teaching and Assessment in UK Medical Schools. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (11):694-699.
    A revised core curriculum for medical ethics and law in UK medical schools has been published. The General Medical Council requires medical graduates to understand law and ethics and behave in accordance with ethical and legal principles. A parallel policy agenda emphasises accountability, the development of professionalism and patient safety. Given the renewed focus on teaching and learning law alongside medical ethics and the development of professional identity, this survey aimed to identify how medical schools are responding to the preparation (...)
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  49.  90
    Pauline Kleingeld, Cosmopolitanism. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    The word ‘cosmopolitan’, which derives from the Greek word kosmopolitês (‘citizen of the world’), has been used to describe a wide variety of important views in moral and socio political philosophy. The nebulous core shared by all cosmopolitan views is the idea that all human beings, regardless of their political affiliation, do (or at least can) belong to a single community, and that this community should be cultivated. Different versions of cosmopolitanism envision this community in different ways, some focusing on (...)
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  50.  41
    C. Wilson (2013). Grief and the Poet. British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (1):77-91.
    Poetry, drama and the novel present readers and viewers with emotionally significant situations that they often experience as moving, and their being so moved is one of the principal motivations for engaging with fictions. If emotions are considered as action-prompting beliefs about the environment, the appetite for sad or frightening drama and literature is difficult to explain, insofar nothing tragic or frightening is actually happening to the reader, and people do not normally enjoy being sad or frightened. The paper argues (...)
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