Search results for 'attributive use' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Wojciech Rostworowski (2013). The Attributive Use and Russell's Paradigm. Filozofia Nauki 2.score: 180.0
    According to the prevailing view, Russell’s theory of descriptions provides an adequate semantic account of sentences with definite descriptions in the attributive use. The author challenges this assumption. Firstly, he presents two general ‘Straw­sonian’ objections to Russell’s theory, which, as he argues, are valid in the case of attributive assertions. Those are arguments against the so called existential reading and the uniqueness-reading of an attributively used sentence of the form “The F is G”. Finally, the author presents his (...)
     
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  2. A. P. Martinich (1977). The Attributive Use of Proper Names. Analysis 37 (4):159 - 163.score: 150.0
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  3. Takashi Yagisawa (1985). The Referential and the Attributive: A Distinction in Use? Southern Journal of Philosophy 23 (1):109-125.score: 120.0
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  4. M. Ichael R. Use (2004). I May Be Old Fashioned but… Reviewed by M ICHAEL R USE, 183 Dodd Hall, Department of Philosophy, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306‐1500, USA. [REVIEW] Annals of Science 61 (3).score: 120.0
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  5. Wojciech Rostworowski (forthcoming). Roundabout Semantic Significance of the 'Attributive/Referential' Distinction. Kriterion - Journal of Philosophy 27 (1):30-40.score: 114.0
    In this paper, I argue that contrary to the approach widely taken in the literature, it is possible to retain Russell's theory of definite descriptions and grant some semantic significance to the distinction between the attributive and the referential use. The core of the argumentation is based on recognition of the so-called "roundabout" way in which the use of a definite description may be significant to the semantic features of the sentence: it is a case where the use of (...)
     
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  6. James R. Beebe (2003). Attributive Uses of Prosentences. Ratio 16 (1):1–15.score: 100.0
    Defenders of the prosentential theory of truth claim that the English language contains prosentences which function analogously to their better known cousins – pronouns. Statements such as ‘That is true’ or ‘It is true’, they claim, inherit their content from antecedent statements, just as pronouns inherit their reference from antecedent singular terms. Prosentential theorists claim that the content of these prosentences is exhausted by the content of their antecedents. They then use the notion of the inheritance of content from an (...)
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  7. Charles Sayward (1993). Definite Descriptions, Negation and Necessitation. Russell 13:36-47.score: 66.0
    The principal question asked in this paper is: in the case of attributive usage, is the definite description to be analyzed as Russell said or is it to be treated as a referring expression, functioning semantically as a proper name? It answers by defending the former alternative.
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  8. Thomas D. Bontly (2005). Conversational Implicature and the Referential Use of Descriptions. Philosophical Studies 125 (1):1 - 25.score: 60.0
    This paper enters the continuing fray over the semantic significance of Donnellan’s referential/attributive distinction. Some holdthat the distinction is at bottom a pragmatic one: i.e., that the difference between the referential use and the attributive use arises at the level of speaker’s meaning rather the level of sentence-or utterance-meaning. This view has recently been challenged byMarga Reimer andMichael Devitt, both of whom argue that the fact that descriptions are regularly, that is standardly, usedto refer defeats the pragmatic approach. (...)
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  9. John E. Taplin (1971). Effect of Initial Instance on Attribute Identification of Concepts Using a Selection Procedure. Journal of Experimental Psychology 88 (2):177.score: 56.0
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  10. Scott Soames (2009). Philosophical Essays: Natural Language: What It Means and How We Use It. Princeton University Press.score: 54.0
    The origins of these essays -- Introduction -- Presupposition -- A projection problem for speaker presupposition -- Language and linguistic competence -- Linguistics and psychology -- Semantics and psychology -- Semantics and semantic competence -- The necessity argument -- Truth, meaning, and understanding -- Truth and meaning in perspective -- Semantics and pragmatics -- Naming and asserting -- The gap between meaning and assertion : why what we literally say often differs from what our words literally mean -- Drawing the (...)
     
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  11. Annette Kaltenbaugh (2005). Plagiarism. The Technological, Intellectual, and Personal Facets of the Principles of Attribution, Use, and Acknowledgment. Journal of Information Ethics 14 (2):50-60.score: 50.0
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  12. Ilhan Inan (2006). Are "Attributive” Uses of Definite Descriptions Really Attributive? Kriterion 20:7-13.score: 50.0
  13. Krešimir Agbaba (2009). Attributive” Uses of Definite Descriptions Are Always Attributive. Kriterion 22:1-6.score: 50.0
  14. Ilhan Inan (2006). Are “Attributive” Uses of Definite Descriptions Really Attributive? Kriterion 20:7-13.score: 50.0
  15. Mahrad Almotahari & Adam Hosein (forthcoming). Is Anything Just Plain Good? Philosophical Studies:1-24.score: 42.0
    Geach (Analysis 17: 33–42, 1956) and Thomson (J Philos 94:273–298, 1997, Normativity, 2008) have argued that nothing is just plain good, because ‘good’ is, logically, an attributive adjective. The upshot, according to Geach and Thomson, is that consequentialism is unacceptable, since its very formulation requires a predicative (non-attributive) use of ‘good’. Reactions to the argument have, for the most part, been uniform. Authors have converged on two challenging objections (Ross, The right and the good, 1930; Pidgen, Philos Q (...)
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  16. Douglas Walton (1999). Can an Ancient Argument of Carneades on Cardinal Virtues and Divine Attributes Be Used to Disprove the Existence of God? Philo 2 (2):5-13.score: 42.0
    An ancient argument attributed to the philosopher Carneades is presented that raises critical questions about the concept of an all-virtuous Divine being. The argument is based on the premises that virtue involves overcoming pains and dangers, and that only a being that can suffer or be destroyed is one for whom there are pains and dangers. The conclusion is that an all-virtuous Divine (perfect) being cannot exist. After presenting this argument, reconstructed from sources in Sextus Empiricus and Cicero, this paper (...)
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  17. Julia Lukewich, Renée Corbin, Elizabeth G. VanDenKerkhof, Dana S. Edge, Tyler Williamson & Joan E. Tranmer (forthcoming). Identification, Summary and Comparison of Tools Used to Measure Organizational Attributes Associated with Chronic Disease Management Within Primary Care Settings. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice:n/a-n/a.score: 40.0
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  18. Katherine Nelson (1976). Some Attributes of Adjectives Used by Young Children. Cognition 4 (1):13-30.score: 40.0
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  19. John Ryan & M. W. Boscia (2003). Using Attribution Theory to Help Frame Moral Dilemmas: An Empirical Test of the President Clinton–Monica Lewinski Case. Teaching Business Ethics 7 (2):123-137.score: 40.0
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  20. N. V. Costantino (1979). A Critique of Some Grounds and Methods Which Are Used to Legitimize the Practice of Attributing Effectiveness to Non-Human Agents. Journal of Thought 14 (2):131-37.score: 40.0
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  21. Honghai Feng, Hao Xu, Baoyan Liu, Bingru Yang, Zhuye Gao & Yueli Li (2006). Data Mining, Retrieval and Management-Using Rough Set to Find the Factors That Negate the Typical Dependency of a Decision Attribute on Some Condition Attributes. In O. Stock & M. Schaerf (eds.), Lecture Notes in Computer Science. Springer-Verlag. 713-720.score: 40.0
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  22. F. Kawczynski (2007). On Attributive and Referential Uses of Definite Descriptions. Filozofia Nauki 15 (4 (60)):15-35.score: 40.0
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  23. M. C. LaFollette (1994). Avoiding Plagiarism: Some Thoughts on Use, Attribution, and Acknowledgment. Journal of Information Ethics 3 (2):25-35.score: 40.0
     
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  24. Pratibha Paliwal & Albert E. Goss (1981). Attributes of Schematic Faces in Preschoolers' Use of Names of Emotions. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 17 (3):139-142.score: 40.0
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  25. John M. Polimeni (2005). Simulating Agricultural Conversion to Residential Use in the Hudson River Valley: Scenario Analyses and Case Studies. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 22 (4):377-393.score: 38.0
    Land use changes threaten agricultural land. If agricultural land is going to be preserved, the social and economic causes of conversion must be understood. However, analyzing the causes of agricultural conversion is complex because trends need to be documented before analyzing the causes. One of the leading uses of agricultural land is for residential purposes. This paper projects residential development in a Hudson River Valley watershed within Dutchess County in New York State using an integrated modeling framework consisting of an (...)
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  26. Carmen Valor, Isabel Carrero & Raquel Redondo (2014). The Influence of Knowledge and Motivation on Sustainable Label Use. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (4):591-607.score: 38.0
    Sustainable labels are considered the best way for consumers to identify brands with environmental or social attributes on the shelves, and therefore promoted as a means to develop the so-called “ethical markets”. However, little is known about how consumers use these brands. This paper tries to offer complementary theoretical insights on the determinants of sustainable label use by drawing on the economic model of information search; in particular, it examines the influence of two factors on the purchase of such labels: (...)
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  27. Thomas E. Patton (1997). Explaining Referential/Attributive. Mind 106 (422):245-261.score: 32.0
    Kaplan, Stalnaker and Wettstein all urge a two-stage theory of language whereon the propositions expressed by sentences are generated prior to being evaluated. A new ambiguity for sentences emerges, propositional rather syntactic or semantic. Kaplan and Wettstein then propose to explain Donnellan's referential/attributive ambiguity as simply being two-stage propositional ambiguity. This is tacitly seen as further confirmation for two-stage theory. Modal ambiguities are prime motivators for two-stage theory which distinguishes local from exotic evaluation to explain them. But if sentences (...)
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  28. James Conant (1998). Wittgenstein on Meaning and Use. Philosophical Investigations 21 (3):222–250.score: 30.0
    Wittgenstein is usually taken to have held that the use of a term is not mentally constrained. That is utterly wrong. A use of language unconstrained by meaning is attributed by him to "meaning-blind" or "aspect-blind" creatures, not to us. We observe meaning when an aspect dawns on us; meaning is the impression (Eindruck) of a term as fitting something; hence, unlike pain, it cannot stand alone. That is a mentalistic theory of meaning: use is determined by images (Vorstellungen) that (...)
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  29. A. Bezuidenhout (1997). Pragmatics, Semantic Undetermination and the Referential/Attributive Distinction. Mind 106 (423):375-409.score: 30.0
    It has long ben recognised that there are referential uses of definite descriptions. It is not as widely recognised that there are atttributives uses of idexicals and other such paradigmatically singular terms. I offer an account of the referential/attributive distinction which is intended to give a unified treatment of both sorts of cases. I argue that the best way to account for the referential/attributive distinction is to treat is as semantically underdetermined which sort of propositions is expressed in (...)
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  30. Kent Johnson, Keith Donnellan.score: 30.0
    Keith Donnellan (1931 – ) began his studies at the University of Maryland, and earned his Bachelor’s degree from Cornell University. He stayed on at Cornell, earning a Master’s and a PhD in 1961. He also taught at there for several years before moving to UCLA in 1970, where he is currently Emeritus Professor of Philosophy. Donnellan’s work is mainly in the philosophy of language, with an emphasis on the connections between semantics and pragmatics. His most influential work was his (...)
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  31. Henry Jackman, Temporal Externalism, Use and Meaning.score: 30.0
    Our ascriptions of content to utterances in the past attribute to them a level of determinacy that extends beyond what could supervene upon the usage up to the time of those utterances. If one accepts the truth of such ascriptions, one can either (1) argue that future use must be added to the supervenience base that determines meaning, or (2) argue that such cases show that meaning does not supervene upon use at all. The following will argue against authors such (...)
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  32. Valerie Stoker (2007). Vedic Language and Vaiṣṇava Theology:Madhva's Use of Nirukta in His Ṛgbhāṣya. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 35 (2):169-199.score: 30.0
    This article explores the way in which Madhva (1238–1317), the founder of the Dvaita Vedānta system of Hindu thought, reformulates the traditional exegetic practice of nirukta or “word derivation” to validate his pluralistic, hierarchical, and Vaiṣṇava reading of the Ṛgvedic hymns. Madhva’s Ṛgbhāṣya (RB) is conspicuous for its heavy reliance on and unique deployment of this exegetical tactic to validate several key features of his distinctive theology. These features include his belief in Viṣṇu’s unique possession of all perfect attributes (guṇaparipūrṇatva) (...)
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  33. Christian Beyer (2001). A Neo-Husserlian Theory of Speaker's Reference. Erkenntnis 54 (3):277-297.score: 30.0
    It is not well known that in his Göttingen period (1900–1916) Edmund Husserl developed a kind of direct reference theory, anticipating,among other things, the distinction between referential and attributive use of adefinite description, which was rediscovered by Keith Donnellan in 1966 and further analysed by Saul Kripke in 1977. This paper defends the claim that Husserl''s idea of the mental act given voice to in an utterance sheds new light on that distinction and particularly on cases where semantic referent (...)
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  34. Joseph Margolis & Evan Fales (1976). Donnellan on Definite Descriptions. Philosophia 6 (2):289-302.score: 30.0
    Donnellan's distinction between the referential and attributive uses of definite descriptions is shown not to cover exhaustive and exclusive alternatives but to fix the termini of a continuum of cases. in fact, donnellan's distinction rests on a mixed classification: the referential use, concerned with intended referents regardless of what speakers may say about them; the attributive use, concerned with definite descriptions used in using sentences, that something or other may satisfy. given this feature of his account, it is (...)
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  35. Matthew D. Adler, Happiness Surveys and Public Policy: What's the Use?score: 30.0
    This Article provides a comprehensive, critical overview of proposals to use happiness surveys for steering public policy. Happiness or “subjective well-being” surveys ask individuals to rate their present happiness, life-satisfaction, affective state, etc. A massive literature now engages in such surveys or correlates survey responses with individual attributes. And, increasingly, scholars argue for the policy relevance of happiness data: in particular, as a basis for calculating aggregates such as “gross national happiness,” or for calculating monetary equivalents for non-market goods based (...)
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  36. M. Millar (2012). Constraining the Use of Antibiotics: Applying Scanlon's Contractualism. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (8):465-469.score: 30.0
    Decisions to use antibiotics require that patient interests are balanced against the public good, that is, control of antibiotic resistance. Patients carry the risks of suboptimal antibiotic treatment and many physicians are reluctant to impose even small avoidable risks on patients. At the same time, antibiotics are overused and antibiotic-resistant microbes are contributing an increasing burden of adverse patient outcomes. It is the criteria that we can use to reject the use of antibiotics that is the focus of this paper. (...)
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  37. Murad D. Akhundov (2005). Social Influence on Physics and Mathematics: Local or Attributive? [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 36 (1):135 - 149.score: 30.0
    The article is devoted to the nature of science. To what extent are science and mathematics affected by the society in which they are developed? Philosophy of science has accepted the social influence on science, but limits it only to the context of discovery (a "locational" approach). An opposite "attributive" approach states that any part of science may be so influenced. L. Graham is sure that even the mathematical equations at the core of fundamental physical theories may display social (...)
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  38. Ruud Koolen, Martijn Goudbeek & Emiel Krahmer (2013). The Effect of Scene Variation on the Redundant Use of Color in Definite Reference. Cognitive Science 37 (2):395-411.score: 30.0
    This study investigates to what extent the amount of variation in a visual scene causes speakers to mention the attribute color in their definite target descriptions, focusing on scenes in which this attribute is not needed for identification of the target. The results of our three experiments show that speakers are more likely to redundantly include a color attribute when the scene variation is high as compared with when this variation is low (even if this leads to overspecified descriptions). We (...)
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  39. Bob Rigter (1982). Intensional Domains and the Use of Tense, Perfect and Modals in English. Journal of Semantics 1 (2):95-145.score: 30.0
    A theory for the use of tense and perfect in English should do three things: 1. It should provide rules defining the phrase markers in which tense and perfect can occur; 2. It should specify what extralinguistic phenomena correlate with the occurrence of tense and perfect in the structures that underlie English sentences; 3. It should provide rules which are sensitive to these extralinguistic phenomena, and which place either +PAST or −PAST under tense nodes and either HAVE or f) under (...)
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  40. Andres Luure (2002). Understanding Life. Sign Systems Studies 30 (1):315-325.score: 30.0
    This paper sketches a network of analogies reaching from linguosemiotics (including theory of reference in analytical philosophy of language) to biosemiotics. It results in the following proportion: attributive use of referring expressions : referential use of referring expressions : ‘generative’ use of referring expressions = signifying : referring : ‘poetic pointing’ = ‘functional’ semiosis : ‘adaptational’ semiosis : semiosis in the narrow sense.
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  41. Rachel Brown (2004). Righting Ecofeminist Ethics: The Scope and Use of Moral Entitlement. Environmental Ethics 26 (3):247-265.score: 30.0
    Rights have been criticized as incorporating features that are antithetical to ecofeminism: rights are allegedly inherently adversarial; they are based on a conception of the person that fails to reflect women’s experience, biased in an illegitimate way toward humans rather than nonhumans, overly formal, and incapable of admitting the importance of emotion in ethics. Such criticisms are founded in misunderstandings of the ways in which rights operate and may be met by an adequate theory of rights. The notions of entitlement (...)
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  42. Thomas Bøker Lund, Thorkild I. A. Sørensen, I. Anna S. Olsson, Axel Kornerup Hansen & Peter Sandøe (forthcoming). Is It Acceptable to Use Animals to Model Obese Humans? A Critical Discussion of Two Arguments Against the Use of Animals in Obesity Research. Journal of Medical Ethics:2011-100368.score: 30.0
    Animal use in medical research is widely accepted on the basis that it may help to save human lives and improve their quality of life. Recently, however, objections have been made specifically to the use of animals in scientific investigation of human obesity. This paper discusses two arguments for the view that this form of animal use, unlike some other forms of animal-based medical research, cannot be defended. The first argument leans heavily on the notion that people themselves are responsible (...)
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  43. Jack C. Swearengen (1999). Brownfields and Greenfields: An Ethical Perspective on Land Use. Environmental Ethics 21 (3):277-292.score: 30.0
    America’s industries and families continue to forsake cities for suburban and rural environs, in the process leaving nonproductive lands (brownfields) and simultaneously removing greenfield land from agriculturally or biologically productive use. In spite of noteworthy exceptions, urban regions which once functioned as vital communities continue in economic and social decline. Discussion or debate about the problem (or, indeed, whether it is a problem at all) invokes systems of values which often are not articulated. Some attribute the urban exodus to departure (...)
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  44. [deleted]Michiel Van Elk, Hein T. Van Schie, Ruby Van Den Heuvel & Harold Bekkering (2010). Semantics in the Motor System: Motor-Cortical Beta Oscillations Reflect Semantic Knowledge of End-Postures for Object Use. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 30.0
    In the present EEG study we investigated whether semantic knowledge for object use is represented in motor-related brain areas. Subjects were required to perform actions with everyday objects and to maintain either a meaningful or a meaningless end posture with the object. Analysis of the EEG data focused on the beta-frequency band, as previous studies have indicated that the maintenance of a posture is reflected in stronger beta-oscillations. Time frequency analysis indicated that the execution of actions resulting in a meaningless (...)
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  45. Megan Johanson & Anna Papafragou (2014). What Does Children's Spatial Language Reveal About Spatial Concepts? Evidence From the Use of Containment Expressions. Cognitive Science 38 (2):881-910.score: 30.0
    Children's overextensions of spatial language are often taken to reveal spatial biases. However, it is unclear whether extension patterns should be attributed to children's overly general spatial concepts or to a narrower notion of conceptual similarity allowing metaphor-like extensions. We describe a previously unnoticed extension of spatial expressions and use a novel method to determine its origins. English- and Greek-speaking 4- and 5-year-olds used containment expressions (e.g., English into, Greek mesa) for events where an object moved into another object but (...)
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  46. Nashid Kamal, Andrew Sloggett & John G. Cleland (1999). Area Variations in Use of Modern Contraception in Rural Bangladesh: A Multilevel Analysis. Journal of Biosocial Science 31 (3):327-341.score: 30.0
    This study in Bangladesh found that inter-cluster variation in the use of modern reversible methods of contraception was significantly attributable to the educational levels of the female family planning workers working in the clusters. Women belonging to clusters served by educated workers had a higher probability of being contraceptive users than those whose workers had only completed primary education. At the household level, important determinants of use were socioeconomic status and religion. At the individual level, the woman being the wife (...)
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  47. Martin Montminy (2005). What Use is Morgan's Canon? Philosophical Psychology 18 (4):399-414.score: 28.0
    Morgan's canon can be construed as claiming that an intentional explanation of a behavior should be ruled out if there exists an explanation of this behavior in terms of 'lower' mechanisms. Unfortunately, Morgan's conception of higher and lower faculties is based on dubious evolutionary considerations. I examine alternative interpretations of the terms 'higher' and 'lower', and show that none can turn the canon into a principle that is both correct and useful in drawing the line between thinkers and non-thinkers. In (...)
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  48. Murali Ramachandran (2008). Descriptions and Pressupositions: Strawson Vs. Russel. South African Journal of Philosophy 27 (3):242-257.score: 26.0
    A Russellian theory of (definite) descriptions takes an utterance of the form ‘The F is G' to express a purely general proposition that affirms the existence of a (contextually) unique F: there is exactly one F [which is C] and it is G. Strawson, by contrast, takes the utterer to presuppose in some sense that there is exactly one salient F, but this is not part of what is asserted; rather, when the presupposition is not met the utterance simply fails (...)
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  49. Jason Merchant, Genitives of Comparison in Greek.score: 26.0
    Abstract Standards of comparison in Greek can be marked either by a preposition or by use of the genitive case. The prepositional standards are compatible with both synthetic and analytic comparative forms, while genitive standards are found only with synthetic comparatives. I show that this follows if genitive case is assigned by the affix to its complement, and that this structure furthermore supports a straightforward semantic composition, both in predicative and attributive uses.
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  50. Krist Vaesen (2012). The Cognitive Bases of Human Tool Use. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (4):203-262.score: 24.0
    This article has two goals. First, it synthesizes and critically assesses current scientific knowledge about the cognitive bases of human tool use. Second, it shows how the cognitive traits reviewed help to explain why technological accumulation evolved so markedly in humans, and so modestly in apes.
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