Search results for 'autonomy of special sciences' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Peter Menzies & Christian List (2010). The Causal Autonomy of the Special Sciences. In Cynthia Mcdonald & Graham Mcdonald (eds.), Emergence in Mind. Oxford University Press.score: 820.0
    The systems studied in the special sciences are often said to be causally autonomous, in the sense that their higher-level properties have causal powers that are independent of those of their more basic physical properties. This view was espoused by the British emergentists, who claimed that systems achieving a certain level of organizational complexity have distinctive causal powers that emerge from their constituent elements but do not derive from them.2 More recently, non-reductive physicalists have espoused a similar view (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Paco Calvo & John Symons, Radical Embodiment and Morphological Computation: Against the Autonomy of (Some) Special Sciences.score: 648.0
    An asymmetry between the demands at the computational and algorithmic levels of description furnishes the illusion that the abstract profile at the computational level can be multiply realized, and that something is actually being shared at the algorithmic one. A disembodied rendering of the situation lays the stress upon the different ways in which an algorithm can be implemented. However, from an embodied approach, things look rather different. The relevant pairing, I shall argue, is not between implementation and algorithm, but (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. David Pineda (2011). Non-Committal Causal Explanations. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 24 (2):147-170.score: 546.0
    Some causal explanations are non-committal in that mention of a property in the explanans conveys information about the causal origin of the explanandum even if the property in question plays no causal role for the explanandum . Programme explanations are a variety of non-committal causal (NCC) explanations. Yet their interest is very limited since, as I will argue in this paper, their range of applicability is in fact quite narrow. However there is at least another variety of NCC explanations, causal (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Matthew C. Haug (2011). Abstraction and Explanatory Relevance; or, Why Do the Special Sciences Exist? Philosophy of Science 78 (5):1143-1155.score: 384.0
    Non-reductive physicalists have long held that the special sciences offer explanations of some phenomena that are objectively superior to physical explanations. This explanatory “autonomy” has largely been based on the multiple realizability argument. Recently, in the face of the local reduction and disjunctive property responses to multiple realizability, some defenders of non-reductive physicalism have suggested that autonomy can be grounded merely in human cognitive limitations. In this paper, I argue that this is mistaken. By distinguishing between (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Robert B. Glassman (2006). Metaphysics of Money: A Special Case of Emerging Autonomy in Evolving Subsystems. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (2):186-187.score: 384.0
    There is “something more” to money, as this incisive review shows. The target article's shortcoming is its overextension of the “drug” metaphor as a blend of features that do not fit the rationalistic economics and behavioral psychologies summarized as tool theories, but this may be resolved by viewing money as a particular case of the more general evolutionary phenomenon of emergent subsystem autonomy. (Published Online April 5 2006).
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Theo C. Meyering (2000). Physicalism and Downward Causation in Psychology and the Special Sciences. Inquiry 43 (2):181-202.score: 368.0
    Physicalism ? or roughly the view that the stuff that physics talks about is all the stuff there is ? has had a popular press in philosophical circles during the twentieth century. And yet, at the same time, it has become quite fashionable lately to believe that the mind matters in this world after all and that psychology is an autonomous science irreducible to physics. However, if (true, downward) mental causation implies non-reducibility and Physicalism implies the converse, it is hard (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Alex Rosenberg, Comments and Criticism on Multiple Realization and the Special Sciences.score: 360.0
    It is widely held that disciplines are autonomous when their taxonomies are “substrate neutral” and when the events, states and processes that realize their descriptive vocabulary are heterogeneous. This will be particularly true in the case of disciplines whose taxonomy consists largely in terms that individuate by function. Having concluded that the multiple realization of functional kinds is far less widespread than assumed or argued for, Shapiro cannot avail himself of the argument for the autonomy of the special (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Kent Johnson & Wayne Wright (2006). Colors as Properties of the Special Sciences. Erkenntnis 64 (2):139 - 168.score: 348.0
    We examine the pros and cons of color realism, exposing some desiderata on a theory of color: the theory should render colors as scientifically legitimate and correctly individuated, and it should explain how we have veridical color experiences. We then show that these desiderata can by met by treating colors as properties of the special sciences. According to our view, some of the major as properties of the special sciences. According to our view, some of the (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Amir Eshan Karbasizadeh (2008). Revising the Concept of Lawhood: Special Sciences and Natural Kinds. Synthese 162 (1):15 - 30.score: 344.3
    The Kripkean conception of natural kinds (kinds are defined by essences that are intrinsic to their members and that lie at the microphysical level) indirectly finds support in a certain conception of a law of nature, according to which generalizations must have unlimited scope and be exceptionless to count as laws of nature. On my view, the kinds that constitute the subject matter of special sciences such as biology may very well turn out to be natural despite the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Jonathan Cohen & Craig Callender (2010). Special Sciences, Conspiracy and the Better Best System Account of Lawhood. Erkenntnis 73 (3):427 - 447.score: 342.8
    An important obstacle to lawhood in the special sciences is the worry that such laws would require metaphysically extravagant conspiracies among fundamental particles. How, short of conspiracy, is this possible? In this paper we'll review a number of strategies that allow for the projectibility of special science generalizations without positing outlandish conspiracies: non-Humean pluralism, classical MRL theories of laws, and Albert and Loewer's theory. After arguing that none of the above fully succeed, we consider the conspiracy problem (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Mark Colyvan, The Undeniable Effectiveness of Mathematics in the Special Sciences.score: 342.0
    In many of the special sciences, mathematical models are used to provide information about specified target systems. For instance, population models are used in ecology to make predictions about the abundance of real populations of particular organisms. The status of mathematical models, though, is unclear and their use is hotly contested by some practitioners. A common objection levelled against the use of these models is that they ignore all the known, causally-relevant details of the often complex target systems. (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Daniele Dubois (1994). Identity and Autonomy of Psychology in Cognitive Sciences: Some Remarks From Language Processing and Knowledge Representation. World Futures 42 (1):71-78.score: 342.0
    (1994). Identity and autonomy of psychology in cognitive sciences: Some remarks from language processing and knowledge representation. World Futures: Vol. 42, No. 1-2, pp. 71-78.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Rosemary Deem (1996). The Future of Educational Research in the Context of the Social Sciences: A Special Case? British Journal of Educational Studies 44 (2):143 - 158.score: 333.0
    The paper examines the future prospects for educational research as conducted in UK universities and colleges of higher education in the light of current general changes in the organisation, funding and culture of higher education, and in respect of specific changes in the initial and in service training of teachers. It includes a critical examination of the claim made by some educational researchers that their research constitutes a special case, differentiated from other social science and humanities disciplines, both by (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Barry Loewer (2009). Why is There Anything Except Physics? Synthese 170 (2):217 - 233.score: 306.0
    In the course of defending his view of the relation between the special sciences and physics from Jaegwon Kim’s objections Jerry Fodor asks “So then, why is there anything except physics?” By which he seems to mean to ask if physics is fundamental and complete in its domain how can there be autonomous special science laws. Fodor wavers between epistemological and metaphysical understandings of the autonomy of the special sciences. In my paper I draw (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. H. G. Callaway & Paul Gochet (2007). Quine's Physicalism. In Filosofia, Scienza e Bioetica nel dibattito contemperano, Studi internazionali in onore di Evandro Agazzi, pp. 1105-1115.score: 306.0
    In this paper we briefly examine and evaluate Quine’s physicalism. On the supposition, in accordance with Quine’s views, that there can be no change of any sort without a physical change, we argue that this point leaves plenty of room to understand and accept a limited autonomy of the special sciences and of other domains of disciplinary and common-sense inquiry and discourse. The argument depends on distinguishing specific, detailed programs of reduction from the general Quinean strategy of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Markus Schrenk (2006). A Theory for Special Science Laws. In H. Bohse & S. Walter (eds.), Selected Papers Contributed to the Sections of GAP.6. mentis.score: 291.0
    This paper explores whether it is possible to reformulate or re-interpret Lewis’s theory of fundamental laws of nature—his “best system analysis”—in such a way that it becomes a useful theory for special science laws. One major step in this enterprise is to make plausible how law candidates within best system competitions can tolerate exceptions—this is crucial because we expect special science laws to be so called “ceteris paribus laws”. I attempt to show how this is possible and also (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Lydia Patton (forthcoming). Methodology of the Sciences. In Michael Forster & Kristin Gjesdal (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of German Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century. Oxford University Press.score: 288.0
    In the growing Prussian university system of the early nineteenth century, "Wissenschaft" (science) was seen as an endeavor common to university faculties, characterized by a rigorous methodology. On this view, history and jurisprudence are sciences, as much as is physics. Nineteenth century trends challenged this view: the increasing influence of materialist and positivist philosophies, profound changes in the relationships between university faculties, and the defense of Kant's classification of the sciences by neo-Kantians. Wilhelm Dilthey's defense of the independence (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Julie Zahle, Alban Bouvier, Byron Kaldis, Thomas Uevel & Jesús Zamora-Bonilla (2013). Special Issue: Papers From the Inaugural Meeting of ENPOSS (European Network for the Philosophy of the Social Sciences), University of Copenhagen, September 21-23, 2012. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 43 (3).score: 279.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Andreas Hüttemann & Alexander Reutlinger (forthcoming). Against the Statistical Account of Special Science Laws. In Vassilios Karakostas & Dennis Dieks (eds.), Recent Progress in Philosophy of Science: Perspectives and Foundational Problems. The Third European Philosophy of Science Association Proceedings. Springer.score: 273.0
    John Earman and John T. Roberts advocate a challenging and radical claim regarding the semantics of laws in the special sciences: the statistical account. According to this account, a typical special science law “asserts a certain precisely defined statistical relation among well-defined variables” (Earman and Roberts 1999) and this statistical relation does not require being hedged by ceteris paribus conditions. In this paper, we raise two objections against the attempt to cash out the content of special (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Brian L. Keeley (2000). Shocking Lessons From Electric Fish: The Theory and Practice of Multiple Realization. Philosophy Of Science 67 (3):444-465.score: 272.0
    This paper explores the relationship between psychology and neurobiology in the context of cognitive science. Are the sciences that constitute cognitive science independent and theoretically autonomous, or is there a necessary interaction between them? I explore Fodor's Multiple Realization Thesis (MRT) which starts with the fact of multiple realization and purports to derive the theoretical autonomy of special sciences (such as psychology) from structural sciences (such as neurobiology). After laying out the MRT, it is shown (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Carl Gillett (2003). The Metaphysics of Realization, Multiple Realizability, and the Special Sciences. Journal of Philosophy 100 (11):591-603.score: 271.5
  22. Jerry A. Fodor (2002). 18 Special Sciences (Or: The Disunity of Science As. In David J. Chalmers (ed.), Philosophy of Mind: Classical and Contemporary Readings. Oxford University Press. 126.score: 265.5
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. H. Kincaid (1999). Individualism and the Unity of Science: Essays on Reduction, Explanation and the Special Sciences (Steve Clarke). Australasian Journal of Philosophy 77 (4):518-518.score: 265.5
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Helen Meekosha (2010). The Complex Balancing Act of Choice, Autonomy, Valued Life, and Rights: Bringing a Feminist Disability Perspective to Bioethics. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (2):1-8.score: 264.0
    Disabled women were absent for many years from the discipline that has become known as women and gender studies. This field of study had its origins in the late 1970s following the second wave of feminism. In the latter decades of the twentieth century, disabled women and their allies introduced the necessary task of exploring disabled women's embodiment to the wider feminist community. A wealth of research now exists that incorporates disabled women's bodies into a range of disciplines: from literature, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Philip Kitcher (2004). On the Autonomy of the Sciences. Philosophy Today 48 (5):51-57.score: 263.3
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Jules Henry (1950). The Principle of Limits: With Special Reference to the Social Sciences. Philosophy of Science 17 (3):247-253.score: 261.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Faustino Luiz Couto Teixeira (2011). O “ensino do religioso” e as Ciências da Religião (Teaching “of the religious” and Sciences of Religion) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2011v9n23p839. [REVIEW] Horizonte 9 (23):839-861.score: 261.0
    Tendo em vista o amplo debate que divide a opinião de pesquisadores hoje no Brasil em torno da complexa questão do “ensino religioso” na escola pública, este artigo busca situar o tema na perspectiva das ciências da religião. Busca-se apontar a possibilidade de um aporte singular desse novo campo disciplinar no “ensino do religioso”. Sem cair num proselitismo problemático, busca-se mostrar a pertinência e plausibilidade de uma reflexão que favoreça a aproximação e o conhecimento por parte dos alunos das distintas (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. J. A. Fodor (1974). Special Sciences (Or: The Disunity of Science as a Working Hypothesis). Synthese 28 (2):97-115.score: 256.5
  29. Hinne Hettema (2013). Olga Pombo, Juan Manuel Torres, John Symons, and Shadid Rahman, Eds. , Special Sciences and the Unity of Science . Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 33 (4):315-317.score: 256.5
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Zbigniew Kuderowicz & Maciej Łęcki (1975). The Problem of the Relation of Philosophy to Special Sciences as Discussed in Cracow in the Period 1944—1974. Dialectics and Humanism 2 (2):147-155.score: 256.5
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. M. Buhr (1979). Place and the Function of Philosophy and Special Sciences in Contemporary-World. Filosoficky Casopis 27 (1):1-6.score: 256.5
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Giuseppina D'Oro (2011). Davidson and the Autonomy of the Human Sciences. In Jeff Malpas (ed.), Dialogues with Davidson: New Perspectives on his Philosophy. MIT.score: 256.5
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Jerry Fodor (1974). Special Sciences, or Disunity of Science as a Working Hypothesis. Synthese 28 (2):97--115.score: 256.5
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. A. Gajano (1993). Doctrina-Et-Disciplina-Unity of the Sciences and Autonomy of Reason in Descartes'regulae Ad Directionem Ingenii'. Giornale Critico Della Filosofia Italiana 13 (1):57-85.score: 256.5
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Torres Juan, Pombo Olga, Symons John & Rahman Shahid (eds.) (2012). Special Sciences and the Unity of Science. Springer.score: 256.5
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Lee McIntyre (2012). Explaining Explanation: Essays in the Philosophy of the Special Sciences. University Press of America.score: 256.5
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. A. Polikarov (1980). On the Relation of the Philosophy and the Special Sciences. Filosoficky Casopis 28 (2):177-189.score: 256.5
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. S. Sarkisjan (1980). The Penetrating of the Ideas of the Philosophy Into the Special Sciences. Filosoficky Casopis 28 (2):190-200.score: 256.5
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Robert D. Rupert (2008). Ceteris Paribus Laws, Component Forces, and the Nature of Special-Science Properties. Noûs 42 (3):349-380.score: 254.3
    Laws of nature seem to take two forms. Fundamental physics discovers laws that hold without exception, ‘strict laws’, as they are sometimes called; even if some laws of fundamental physics are irreducibly probabilistic, the probabilistic relation is thought not to waver. In the nonfundamental, or special, sciences, matters differ. Laws of such sciences as psychology and economics hold only ceteris paribus – that is, when other things are equal. Sometimes events accord with these ceteris paribus laws (c.p. (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Tim Crane (1999). The Autonomy of Psychology. In Rob Wilson & Frank Keil (eds.), The MIT Encyclopedia of the Cognitive Sciences. MIT Press.score: 243.0
    Psychology has been considered to have an autonomy from the other sciences (especially physical science) in at least two ways: in its subject-matter and in its methods. To say that the subject-matter of psychology is autonomous is to say that psychology deals with entities—properties, relations, states—which are not dealt with or not wholly explicable in terms of physical (or any other) science. Contrasted with this is the idea that psychology employs a characteristic method of explanation, which is not (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Klaus Ruthenberg (2011). Chemistry as the Special Science of the Elements. Metascience 20 (3):537-541.score: 243.0
    Chemistry as the special science of the elements Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11016-010-9458-4 Authors Klaus Ruthenberg, Faculty of Science, Coburg University of Applied Sciences, 96406 Coburg, Germany Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Jaegwon Kim (2005). Laws, Causation, and Explanation in the Special Sciences. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 27 (3/4):325 - 338.score: 243.0
    There is the general philosophical question concerning the relationship between physics, which is often taken to be our fundamental and all-encompassing science, on one hand and the special sciences, such as biology and psychology, each of which deals with phenomena in some specially restricted domain, on the other. This paper deals with a narrower question: Are there laws in the special sciences, laws like those we find, or expect to find, in basic physics? Three arguments that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. R. Thomas (2012). B. Buldt, B. Lowe and T. Muller (Eds.), Special Issue of Erkenntnis: Towards a New Epistemology of Mathematics_ ; B. Lowe and T. Muller (Eds.), _PhiMSAMP: Philosophy of Mathematics: Sociological Aspects and Mathematical Practice_; K. Francois, B. Lowe, T. Muller and B. Van Kerkhove (Eds.), _Foundations of the Formal Sciences VII: Bringing Together Philosophy and Sociology of Science. [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica 20 (2):258-260.score: 243.0
  44. R. G. Carpenter (1960). Principles and Procedures of Statistics, with Special Reference to the Biological Sciences. The Eugenics Review 52 (3):172.score: 243.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Michael Sollberger (2005). Commentary on Jaegwon Kim, "Laws, Causation, and Explanation in the Special Sciences". History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 27 (3/4):339 - 344.score: 243.0
    In the present commentary on Jaegwon Kim's Laws, Causation, and Explanation in the Special Sciences, I first give a short summary of the global problem. In a second step, I go on to sum up and comment on the three arguments which Kim gives to the disadvantage of 'strict' special-science laws. In so doing, I shall focus on the question whether ceteris paribus laws can still apply in special sciences.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Robert Thomas (2012). B. Buldt, B. Löwe and T. Müller (Eds.), Special Issue Towards a New Epistemology of Mathematics; B. Löwe and T. Müller (Eds.), PhiMSAMP: Philosophy of Mathematics: Sociological Aspects and Mathematical Practice; K. François, B. Löwe, T. Müller and B. Van Kerkhove (Eds.), Foundations of the Formal Sciences VII: Bringing Together Philosophy and Sociology of Science. [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica 20 (2):258-260.score: 243.0
  47. William Griffiths Black (1936). The Development and Present Status of Teacher Education in Western Canada, with Special Reference to the Curriculum: A Part of a Dissertation Submitted to the Faculty of the Division of the Social Sciences in Candidacy for the Degree of Philosophy. University of Chicago Libraries.score: 243.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Fredric L. Cheyette (1981). P. H. Sawyer, Ed., Names, Words and Graves: Early Medieval Settlement. Lectures Delivered in the University of Leeds, May 1978. Leeds, Eng.: School of History, University of Leeds, 1979. Paper. Pp. Vii, 93. £3.50.Actes du Xème Congrès des Historiens Médiévistes de l'Enseignement Supérieur Public, Lille-Villeneuve d'Ascq, 18–19 Mai 1979: Le Paysage Rural. Réalités Et Représentations.” (Numéro Spécial de la Revue du Nord, 62/244. Janvier-Mars, 1980.) Villeneuve d'Ascq: Université des Sciences Humaines, Lettres Et Arts. Paper. Pp. 319.Landscape History 1 (1979). Paper. Pp. 89; 28 Illustrations. May Be Ordered From the Editor, Dr. M. L. Faull, 3 Benjamin St., Wakefield, Eng. WF2 9AN.Lester J. Bilsky, Ed., Historical Ecology: Essays on Environment and Social Change. (National University Publications.) Port Washington, N.Y., and London: Kennikat Press, 1980. Pp. 195. $13.50. [REVIEW] Speculum 56 (3):677-678.score: 243.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Hans Kühner (1984). Between Autonomy and Planning: The Chinese Academy of Sciences in Transition. [REVIEW] Minerva 22 (1):13-44.score: 243.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. M. Siderits (1998). Epistemology, Meaning and Metaphysics After Matilal, Special Issue of Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences, Vol. 3, No. 2, Edited by Arindam Chakrabarti. [REVIEW] Philosophy East and West 48:503-513.score: 243.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000