Search results for 'behaviorism' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Hanoch Ben-Yami (2005). Behaviorism and Psychologism: Why Block's Argument Against Behaviorism is Unsound. Philosophical Psychology 18 (2):179-186.score: 18.0
    Ned Block ((1981). Psychologism and behaviorism. Philosophical Review, 90, 5-43.) argued that a behaviorist conception of intelligence is mistaken, and that the nature of an agent's internal processes is relevant for determining whether the agent has intelligence. He did that by describing a machine which lacks intelligence, yet can answer questions put to it as an intelligent person would. The nature of his machine's internal processes, he concluded, is relevant for determining that it lacks intelligence. I argue against (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Bruce A. Thyer (ed.) (1999). The Philosophical Legacy of Behaviorism. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 18.0
    The Philosophical Legacy of Behaviorism is the first book to describe the unique contributions of a behavioral perspective to the major issues of philosophy. Leading behavioral philosophers and psychologists have contributed chapters on: the origins of behaviorism as a philosophy of science; the basic principles of behaviorism; ontology; epistemology; values and ethics; free will, determinism and self-control; and language and verbal behavior. A concluding chapter provides an overview of some scholarly criticisms of behavioral philosophy. Far from espousing (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Fred A. Keijzer (2005). Theoretical Behaviorism Meets Embodied Cognition: Two Theoretical Analyses of Behavior. Philosophical Psychology 18 (1):123-143.score: 18.0
    This paper aims to do three things: First, to provide a review of John Staddon's book Adaptive dynamics: The theoretical analysis of behavior. Second, to compare Staddon's behaviorist view with current ideas on embodied cognition. Third, to use this comparison to explicate some outlines for a theoretical analysis of behavior that could be useful as a behavioral foundation for cognitive phenomena. Staddon earlier defended a theoretical behaviorism, which allows internal states in its models but keeps these to a minimum (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Tyrus Fisher (2011). Quine's Behaviorism and Linguistic Meaning: Why Quine's Behaviorism is Not Illicit. Philosophia 39 (1):51-59.score: 18.0
    Some of Quine’s critics charge that he arrives at a behavioristic account of linguistic meaning by starting from inappropriately behavioristic assumptions (Kripke 1982, 14; Searle 1987, 123). Quine has even written that this account of linguistic meaning is a consequence of his behaviorism (Quine 1992, 37). I take it that the above charges amount to the assertion that Quine assumes the denial of one or more of the following claims: (1) Language-users associate mental ideas with their linguistic expressions. (2) (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Gary Hatfield, Behaviorism and Naturalism.score: 18.0
    In Cambridge History of Philosophy, 18701945, ed. by Thomas Baldwin (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003), 640648. Key words: behaviorism, neobehaviorism, Watson, Singer, Holt, Perry, Tolman, Hull, Skinner.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Beth Preston (1994). Behaviorism and Mentalism: Is There a Third Alternative? Synthese 100 (2):167-96.score: 18.0
    Behaviorism and mentalism are commonly considered to be mutually exclusive and conjunctively exhaustive options for the psychological explanation of behavior. Behaviorism and mentalism do differ in their characterization of inner causes of behavior. However, I argue that they are not mutually exclusive on the grounds that they share important foundational assumptions, two of which are the notion of an innerouter split and the notion of control. I go on to argue that mentalism and behaviorism are not conjunctively (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. M. Moskopp Kurthen, Linke D. & Reuter D. B. (1991). The Locked-in Syndrome and the Behaviorist Epistemology of Other Minds. Theoretical Medicine 12 (March):69-79.score: 18.0
    In this paper, the problem of correct ascriptions of consciousness to patients in neurological intensive care medicine is explored as a special case of the general philosophical other minds problem. It is argued that although clinical ascriptions of consciousness and coma are mostly based on behavioral evidence, a behaviorist epistemology of other minds is not likely to succeed. To illustrate this, the so-called total locked-in syndrome, in which preserved consciousness is combined with a total loss of motor abilities due to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Ullin T. Place (1993). A Radical Behaviorist Methodology for the Empirical Investigation of Private Events. Behavior and Philosophy 20 (21):25-35.score: 18.0
    Skinner has repeatedly asserted that he does not deny either the existence of private events or the possibility of studying them scientifically. But he has never explained how his position in this respect differs from that of the mentalist or provided a practical methodology for the investigation of private events within a radical behaviorist perspective. With respect to the first of these deficiencies, I argue that observation statements describing a public state of affairs in the common public environment of two (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Richard N. Manning (2013). Sellarsian Behaviorism, Davidsonian Interpretivism, and First Person Authority. [REVIEW] Philosophia:1-24.score: 18.0
    Roughly, behaviorist accounts of self-knowledge hold that first persons acquire knowledge of their own minds in just the same way other persons do: by means of behavioral evidence. One obvious problem for such accounts is that the fail to explain the great asymmetry between the authority of first person as opposed to other person attributions of thoughts and other mental states and events. Another is that the means of acquisition seems so different: other persons must infer my mental contents from (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Ullin T. Place (1992). Eliminative Connectionism: Its Implications for a Return to an Empiricist/Behaviorist Linguistics. Behavior and Philosophy 20 (1):21-35.score: 18.0
    For the past three decades linguistic theory has been based on the assumption that sentences are interpreted and constructed by the brain by means of computational processes analogous to those of a serial-digital computer. The recent interest in devices based on the neural network or parallel distributed processor (PDP) principle raises the possibility ("eliminative connectionism") that such devices may ultimately replace the S-D computer as the model for the interpretation and generation of language by the brain. An analysis of the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Richard F. Kitchener (1977). Behavior and Behaviorism. Behaviorism 5:11-68.score: 18.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. William A. Rottschaefer (1983). Verbal Behaviorism and Theoretical Mentalism: An Assessment of Marras-Sellars Dialogue. Philosophy Research Archives 9:511-534.score: 18.0
    Sellars’ verbal behaviorism demands that linguistic episodes be conceptual in an underivative sense and his theoretical mentalism that thoughts as postulated theoretical entities be modelled on linguistic behaviors. Marras has contended that Sellars’ own methodology requires that semantic categories be theoretical. Thus linguistic behaviors can be conceptual in only a derivative sense. Further he claims that overt linguistic behaviors cannot serve as a model for all thought because thought is primarily symbolic. I support verbal behaviorism by showing that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Vicki L. Lee (1988). Beyond Behaviorism. L. Erlbaum Associates.score: 18.0
    Beyond Behaviorism explores and contrasts means and ends psychology with conventional psychology -- that of stimuli and response. The author develops this comparison by exploring the general nature of psychological phenomena and clarifying many persistent doubts about psychology. Dr. Lee contrasts conventional psychology (stimuli and responses) involving reductionistic, organocentric, and mechanistic metatheory with alternative psychology (means and ends) that is autonomous, contextual, and evolutionary.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Thomas Natsoulas (1983). Perhaps the Most Difficult Problem Faced by Behaviorism. Behaviorism 11 (April):1-26.score: 18.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. B. F. Skinner (1974). Behaviorism at Fifty. New York,J. Norton Publishers.score: 16.0
    Each of us is uniquely subject to certain kinds of stimulation from a small part of the universe within our skins. Mentalistic psychologies insist that other kinds of events, lacking the physical dimensions of stimuli, are accessible to the owner of the skin within which they occur. One solution often regarded as behavioristic, granting the distinction between public and private events and ruling the latter out of consideration, has not been successful. A science of behavior must face the problem of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Ned Block (1981). Psychologism and Behaviorism. Philosophical Review 90 (1):5-43.score: 15.0
    Let psychologism be the doctrine that whether behavior is intelligent behavior depends on the character of the internal information processing that produces it. More specifically, I mean psychologism to involve the doctrine that two systems could have actual and potential behavior _typical_ of familiar intelligent beings, that the two systems could be exactly alike in their actual and potential behavior, and in their behavioral dispositions and capacities and counterfactual behavioral properties (i.e., what behaviors, behavioral dispositions, and behavioral capacities they would (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. C. Grant Luckhardt (1983). Wittgenstein and Behaviorism. Synthese 56 (September):319-338.score: 15.0
  18. David L. Boyer (1984). A Widely Accepted but Nonetheless Astonishingly Flimsy Argument Against Analytical Behaviorism. Philosophia 14 (August):153-172.score: 15.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Laurence D. Smith (1986). Behaviorism And Logical Positivism: A Reassessment Of The Alliance. Stanford: Stanford University Press.score: 15.0
    ONE Introduction The history of psychology in the twentieth century is a story of the divorce and remarriage of psychology and philosophy. ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Owen J. Flanagan & T. McCreadie-Albright (1974). Malcolm and the Fallacy of Behaviorism. Philosophical Studies 26 (December):425-30.score: 15.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. V. J. Mcgill (1966). Behaviorism and Phenomenology. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 26 (June):578-588.score: 15.0
  22. Rochelle J. Johnson (1963). A Commentary on Radical Behaviorism. Philosophy of Science 30 (July):274-285.score: 15.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. W. D. Joske (1961). Behaviorism as a Scientific Theory. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 22 (September):61-68.score: 15.0
  24. Larry Hauser, Behaviorism. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 15.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Mark Rowlands (1991). A Defense of Behaviorism. Behavior and Philosophy 19 (1):93-100.score: 15.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. C. D. Rollins (1962). Price's Objections to Behaviorism. Journal of Philosophy 59 (September):547-548.score: 15.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Herbert I. Hochberg (1959). Physicalism, Behaviorism and Phenomena. Philosophy of Science 26 (April):93-103.score: 15.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. V. J. Mcgill & Livingston Welch (1946). A Behaviorist Analysis of Emotions. Philosophy of Science 13 (April):100-122.score: 15.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Raymond J. Nelson (1975). Behaviorism, Finite Automata, and Stimulus-Response Theory. Theory and Decision 6 (August):249-67.score: 15.0
    In this paper it is argued that certain stimulus-response learning models which are adequate to represent finite automata (acceptors) are not adequate to represent noninitial state input-output automata (transducers). This circumstance suggests the question whether or not the behavior of animals if satisfactorily modelled by automata is predictive. It is argued in partial answer that there are automata which can be explained in the sense that their transition and output functions can be described (roughly, Hempel-type covering law explanation) while their (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Paul A. Weiss (1942). Cosmic Behaviorism. Philosophical Review 51 (July):345-356.score: 15.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Willard V. Quine (1980). Sellars on Behaviorism, Language, and Meaning. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 61 (January-April):26-30.score: 15.0
    Accession Number: WOS:A1980JY66900002 Document Type: Article Language: English Reprint Address: QUINE, WV (reprint author), HARVARD UNIV,CAMBRIDGE,MA 02138 Publisher: BLACKWELL PUBL LTD, 108 COWLEY RD, OXFORD, OXON, ENGLAND OX4 1JF Web of Science Category: Philosophy Subject Category: Philosophy IDS Number: JY669 ISSN: 0031-5621.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. James Levine (2009). The Mathematical Roots Of Russell's Naturalism And Behaviorism. The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 4 (1).score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Charles Henry Chase (1927). Trundle-Bed Philosophy; Being a Critique Upon the Modern Cafeteria Method of Education and Pseudo-Scientific Behaviorism. East Lansing, Mich.,The Author.score: 15.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Philip N. Chase & Anne C. Watson (2004). Unconscious Cognition and Behaviorism. Journal of Mind and Behavior 25 (2):145-159.score: 15.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Houghton Dalrymple (1977). Some Logical Muddles in Behaviorism. Southwestern Philosophical Studies 2 (April):64-72.score: 15.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Frank Diehl (1934). An Historical and Critical Study of Radical Behaviorism as a Philosophical Doctrine. Baltimore.score: 15.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Dagfinn Follesdal (1982). Intentionality and Behaviorism. In Logic, Methodology & Philosophy Of Science. Amsterdam: North-Holland.score: 15.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Dale Jacquette (1985). Logical Behaviorism and the Simulation of Mental Episodes. Journal of Mind and Behavior 6 (3):325-332.score: 15.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Arthur Elwin Main (1931). The New Psychology, Behaviorism, and Christian Experience. [Plainfield, N.J.].score: 15.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Jay Moore (2008). Conceptual Foundations of Radical Behaviorism. Sloan Pub..score: 15.0
  41. Bobby Newman (1992). The Reluctant Alliance: Behaviorism and Humanism. Prometheus Books.score: 15.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Nathan Stemmer (1995). A Behaviorist Account to Theory and Simulation Theories of Folk Psychology. Behavior and Philosophy 23 (1):29-41.score: 15.0
  43. G. E. Zuriff (1985). Behaviorism: A Conceptual Reconstruction. Columbia University Press.score: 15.0
  44. G. E. Zuriff (1986). Précis of Behaviorism: A Conceptual Reconstruction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):687.score: 15.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Peter Boghossian (2006). Behaviorism, Constructivism, and Socratic Pedagogy. Educational Philosophy and Theory 38 (6):713–722.score: 12.0
    This paper examines the relationship among behaviorism, constructivism and Socratic pedagogy. Specifically, it asks if a Socratic educator can be a constructivist or a behaviorist. In the first part of the paper, each learning theory, as it relates to the Socratic project, is explained. In the last section, the question of whether or not a Socratic teacher can subscribe to a constructivist or a behaviorist learning theory is addressed. The paper concludes by stating that while Socratic pedagogy shares some (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. P. Harzem (2004). Behaviorism for New Psychology: What Was Wrong with Behaviorism and What is Wrong with It Now. Behavior and Philosophy 32 (1):5-12.score: 12.0
    The evolution of behaviorism from its explicit beginning with John B. Watson's declaration in 1913 to the behaviorisms of the present is considered briefly. Contributions of behaviorism to scientific psychology then and now are critically assessed, arriving at the conclusion that regardless of whether or not its opponents and proponents are aware, the essential points of behaviorism have now been absorbed into all of scientific psychology. It will assist the progress of the science of psychology if its (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Jon D. Ringen (1976). Explanation, Teleology, and Operant Behaviorism. Philosophy of Science 43 (June):223-253.score: 12.0
    B. F. Skinner's claim that "operant behavior is essentially the field of purpose" is systematically explored. It is argued that Charles Taylor's illuminating analysis of the explanatory significance of common-sense goal-ascriptions (1) lends some (fairly restricted) support to Skinner's claim, (2) considerably clarifies the conceptual significance of differences between operant and respondent behavior and conditioning, and (3) undercuts influential assertions (e.g., Taylor's) that research programs for behavioristic psychology share a "mechanistic" orientation. A strategy is suggested for assessing the plausibility of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. John Collier, Some Limitations of Behaviorist and Computational Models of Mind.score: 12.0
    The purpose of this paper is to describe some limitations on scientific behaviorist and computational models of the mind. These limitations stem from the inability of either model to account for the integration of experience and behavior. Behaviorism fails to give an adequate account of felt experience, whereas the computational model cannot account for the integration of our behavior with the world. Both approaches attempt to deal with their limitations by denying that the domain outside their limits is a (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. J. McKenzie Alexander (2002). Behaviorism and Altruistic Acts. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (2):252-252.score: 12.0
    Rachlin's idea that altruism, like self-control, is a valuable, temporally extended pattern of behavior, suggests one way of addressing common problems in developing a rational choice explanation of individual altruistic behavior. However, the form of Rachlin's explicitly behaviorist account of altruistic acts suffers from two faults, one of which questions the feasibility of his particular behaviorist analysis.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Gordon G. Gallup (1998). Mirrors and Radical Behaviorism: Reflections on C. M. Heyes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):119-119.score: 12.0
    Heyes's attempt to reinterpret research on primate cognition from the standpoint of radical behaviorism is strong on dialogue and debate but weak on evidence. Recent evidence concerning self-recognition, for example, shows that her arguments about differential recovery from anesthetization and species differences in face touching as alternative accounts of the behavior of primates in the presence of mirrors) are invalid.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000