Search results for 'bibtex-import' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Jon Barwise & Robin Cooper (1981). Generalized Quantifiers and Natural Language. Linguistics and Philosophy 4 (2):159--219.score: 30.0
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jon Barwise (1979). On Branching Quantifiers in English. Journal of Philosophical Logic 8 (1):47 - 80.score: 30.0
  3. Marcin Mostowski (1998). Computational Semantics for Monadic Quantifiers. Journal of Applied Non--Classical Logics 8 (1-2):107--121.score: 30.0
    The paper gives a survey of known results related to computational devices (finite and push–down automata) recognizing monadic generalized quantifiers in finite models. Some of these results are simple reinterpretations of descriptive—feasible correspondence theorems from finite–model theory. Additionally a new result characterizing monadic quantifiers recognized by push down automata is proven.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Mary Dalrymple, Makoto Kanazawa, Yookyung Kim, Sam McHombo & Stanley Peters (1998). Reciprocal Expressions and the Concept of Reciprocity. Linguistics and Philosophy 21 (2):159-210.score: 30.0
  5. Stanley Peters & Dag Westerståhl (2006). Quantifiers in Language and Logic. Clarendon Press.score: 30.0
    Quantification is a topic which brings together linguistics, logic, and philosophy. Quantifiers are the essential tools with which, in language or logic, we refer to quantity of things or amount of stuff. In English they include such expressions as no, some, all, both, and many. Peters and Westerstahl present the definitive interdisciplinary exploration of how they work - their syntax, semantics, and inferential role. Quantifiers in Language and Logic is intended for everyone with a scholarly interest in the exact treatment (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Dag Westerståhl (1984). Some Results on Quantifiers. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 25 (2):152--169.score: 30.0
  7. Gila Sher (1990). Ways of Branching Quantifers. Linguistics and Philosophy 13 (4):393 - 422.score: 30.0
    Branching quantifiers were first introduced by L. Henkin in his 1959 paper ‘Some Remarks on Infmitely Long Formulas’. By ‘branching quantifiers’ Henkin meant a new, non-linearly structured quantiiier-prefix whose discovery was triggered by the problem of interpreting infinitistic formulas of a certain form} The branching (or partially-ordered) quantifier-prefix is, however, not essentially infinitistic, and the issues it raises have largely been discussed in the literature in the context of finitistic logic, as they will be here. Our discussion transcends, however, the (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. B. Geurts (2005). Monotonicity and Processing Load. Journal of Semantics 22 (1):97-117.score: 30.0
    Starting out from the assumption that monotonicity plays a central role in interpretation and inference, we derive a number of predictions about the complexity of processing quantified sentences. A quantifier may be upward entailing (i.e. license inferences from subsets to supersets) or downward entailing (i.e. license inferences from supersets to subsets). Our main predictions are the following: If the monotonicity profiles of two quantifying expressions are the same, they should be equally easy or hard to process, ceteris paribus. Sentences containing (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. M. Magidor & J. I. Malitz (1977). Compact Extensions of L(Q). Annals of Mathematical Logic 11 (2):217--261.score: 30.0
  10. Marcin Mostowski & Dominika Wojtyniak (2004). Computational Complexity of the Semantics of Some Natural Language Constructions. Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 127 (1-3):219--227.score: 30.0
  11. James H. Schmerl & Stephen G. Simpson (1982). On the Role of Ramsey Quantifiers in First Order Arithmetic. Journal of Symbolic Logic 47 (2):423-435.score: 30.0
  12. Gilad B. Avi & Yoad Winter (2003). Monotonicity and Collective Quantification. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 12 (2):127--151.score: 30.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. D. M. Gabbay & J. M. E. Moravcsik (1974). Branching Quantifiers, English and Montague Grammar. Theoretical Linguistics 1:140--157.score: 30.0
  14. F. Guenthner & J. P. Hoepelman (1976). A Note on the Representation of Branching Quantifiers. Theoretical Linguistics 3:285--289.score: 30.0
  15. Jaakko Hintikka (1976). Partially Ordered Quantifiers Vs. Partially Ordered Ideas. Dialectica 30 (1):89--99.score: 30.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Jaakko Hintikka (1974). Quantifiers Vs. Quantificational Theory. Linguistic Inquiry 5:153--77.score: 30.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Juha Kontinen (2004). Definability of Second Order Generalized Quantifiers. Dissertation, score: 30.0
    We study second order generalized quantifiers on finite structures. One starting point of this research has been the notion of definability of Lindström quantifiers. We formulate an analogous notion for second order generalized quantifiers and study definability of second order generalized quantifiers in terms of Lindström quantifiers.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Per Lindström (1966). First Order Predicate Logic with Generalized Quantifiers. Theoria 32:186--195.score: 30.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. A. Macintyre (1980). Ramsey Quantifiers in Arithmetic. In L. Pacholski, J. Wierzejewski & A. J. Wilkie (eds.), Model Theory of Algebra and Arithmetics. Springer--Verlag. 186--210.score: 30.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. C. T. Mcmillan, R. Clark, P. Moore, C. Devita & M. Grossman (2005). Neural Basis for Generalized Quantifiers Comprehension. Neuropsychologia 43:1729--1737.score: 30.0
  21. C. T. Mcmillan, R. Clark, P. Moore & M. Grossman (2006). Quantifiers Comprehension in Corticobasal Degeneration. Brain and Cognition 65:250--260.score: 30.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. E. Stenius (1976). Comments on Jaakko Hintikka's Paper 'Quantifiers Vs. Quantification Theory'. Dialectica 30 (1):67--88.score: 30.0
  23. Jaap Does (1993). Sums and Quantifiers. Linguistics and Philosophy 16 (5):509--550.score: 30.0
  24. Alberto Vanzo (forthcoming). Kant on Existential Import. Kantian Review 19 (2).score: 18.0
    This paper reconstructs Kant’s view on the existential import of categorical sentences. Kant is widely taken to have held that affirmative sentences (the "A" and "I" sentences of the traditional square of opposition) have existential import, whereas negative sentences ("E" and "O") lack existential import. The paper challenges this standard interpretation. It is argued that Kant ascribes existential import only to affirmative synthetic sentences. However, the reasons for this do not fall within the remit of Kant’s formal logic. Unlike traditional (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Anne C. Bellows & Michael W. Hamm (2001). Local Autonomy and Sustainable Development: Testing Import Substitution in More Localized Food Systems. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 18 (3):271-284.score: 18.0
    Community initiatives to create more localized food systems ofteninclude the strategy of import substitution, i.e., increasing local foodproduction for local consumption. The purpose of this policy iseffectively to supplant some level of imported food into the region. Weargue that such action can carry social and environmental risks as wellas benefits and we have developed research parameters to measure theimpact of such strategies. Harriet Friedmann's seminal work (1991) onthe employment of import substitution by transnational corporationsprovides a framework to identify possible advantages (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. George Bowles & Thomas E. Gilbert (1993). The Probabilistic Import of Illatives. Argumentation 7 (3):247-262.score: 18.0
    It is not only overtly probabilistic illatives like ‘makes it certain that’ but also apparently non-probabilistic ones like ‘therefore’ that have probabilistic import. Illatives like ‘therefore’ convey the meaning that the premise confers on the conclusion a probability not only greater than 0 but also greater than 1/2. But because they do not say whether that probability is equal to or less than 1, these illatives are appropriately called ‘neutral’.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. John N. Martin (2011). Existential Import in Cartesian Semantics. History and Philosophy of Logic 32 (3):211-239.score: 12.0
    The paper explores the existential import of universal affirmative in Descartes, Arnauld and Malebranche. Descartes holds, inconsistently, that eternal truths are true even if the subject term is empty but that a proposition with a false idea as subject is false. Malebranche extends Descartes? truth-conditions for eternal truths, which lack existential import, to all knowledge, allowing only for non-propositional knowledge of contingent existence. Malebranche's rather implausible Neoplatonic semantics is detailed as consisting of three key semantic relations: illumination by which God's (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Michael Böttner (1988). A Note on Existential Import. Studia Logica 47 (1):35 - 40.score: 12.0
    It is shown that a linguistically well-motivated semantical analysis of certain extensions of categorical sentences is compatible with a semantics that fulfils the so-called existential import condition, but is not compatible with a semantics that does not fulfil this condition.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Robert Streiffer & Thomas Hedemann (2005). The Political Import of Intrinsic Objections to Genetically Engineered Food. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (2):191-210.score: 12.0
    Many people object to genetically engineerehd (GE) food because they believe that it is unnatural or that its creation amounts to playing God. These objections are often referred to as intrinsic objections, and they have been widely criticized in the agricultural bioethics literature as being unsound, incompatible with modern science, religious, inchoate, and based on emotion instead of reason. Many of their critics also argue that even if these objections did have some merit as ethicalobjections, their quasi-religious nature means that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Katarina Perovic (forthcoming). The Import of the Original Bradley's Regress(Es). Axiomathes:1-20.score: 12.0
    Much of the recent metaphysical literature on the problem of the relational unity of complexes leaves the impression that Bradley (or some Bradleyan argument) has uncovered a serious problem to be addressed. The problem is thought to be particularly challenging for trope theorists and realists about universals. In truth, there has been little clarity about the nature and import of the original Bradley’s regress arguments. In this paper, I offer a careful analysis and reconstruction of the arguments in Bradley’s Appearance (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Jon D. Ringen (1982). The Explanatory Import of Dispositions: A Defense of Scientific Realism. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1982:122 - 133.score: 12.0
    It is widely assumed that disposition predicates do not designate entities which could be causal factors in the production of natural phenomena. Yet, the fact that an object has a given dispositional property is often taken to help explain behavior exhibited by objects to which the disposition is ascribed. Instrumentalist, realist, and rationalist analyses of disposition predicates embody three quite distinct views of how both assumptions could be correct. It is argued that the instrumentalist fails to capture basic intuitions concerning (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Jan van Eijck, Syllogistics = Monotonicity + Symmetry + Existential Import.score: 12.0
    Syllogistics reduces to only two rules of inference: monotonicity and symmetry, plus a third if one wants to take existential import into account. We give an implementation that uses only the monotonicity and symmetry rules, with an addendum for the treatment of existential import. Soundness follows from the monotonicity properties and symmetry properties of the Aristotelean quantifiers, while completeness for syllogistic theory is proved by direct inspection of the valid syllogisms. Next, the valid syllogisms are decomposed in terms of the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Saloua Chatti & Fabien Schang (2013). The Cube, the Square and the Problem of Existential Import. History and Philosophy of Logic 34 (2):101 - 132.score: 12.0
    (2013). The Cube, the Square and the Problem of Existential Import. History and Philosophy of Logic: Vol. 34, No. 2, pp. 101-132. doi: 10.1080/01445340.2013.764962.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Shu-hsien Liu (1971). The Religious Import of Confucian Philosophy: Its Traditional Outlook and Contemporary Significance. Philosophy East and West 21 (2):157-175.score: 12.0
    Confucianism has usually been regarded as a secular moral philosophy with no religious import at all. In china, However, Confucianism has been mentioned along with buddhism and taoism as one of the three religions (the so-Called san-Chiao) for centuries. This means that we must revise and broaden our traditional concept of religion. The confucian tradition certainly has its unique way of expressing its ultimate and therefore religious concern. The present essay is an attempt to uncover the religious import in confucian (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Jill Rusin (2012). Characterizing Skepticisms Import. International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 2 (2):99-114.score: 12.0
    This paper discusses a common contemporary characterization of skepticism and skeptical arguments-that their real importance is instrumental, that they “drive progress in philosophy.“ I explore two possible contrasts to the idea that skepticism's significance is thus wholly methodological. First, I recall for the reader a range of views that can be understood as `truth in skepticism' views. These concessive views are those most clearly at odds with the idea that skepticism is false, but instrumentally valuable. Considering the contributions of such (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Jan De Rijck, Linos Vandekerckhove, Frauke Christ & Zeger Debyser (2007). Lentiviral Nuclear Import: A Complex Interplay Between Virus and Host. Bioessays 29 (5):441-451.score: 12.0
    Although the capacity to infect non-dividing cells is a hallmark of lentiviruses, nuclear import is still barely understood. More than 100 research papers have been dedicated to this topic during the last 15 years, yet, more questions have been raised than answers. The signal-facilitating translocation of the viral preintegration complex (PIC) through the nuclear pore complex (NPC) remains unknown. It is clear, however, that nuclear import is the result of a complex interplay between viral and cellular components. In this review, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. David Sosa (1996). The Import of the Puzzle About Belief. Philosophical Review 105 (3):373-402.score: 10.0
    Relocating Kripke's puzzle about belief, this paper investigates i) in what the puzzle consists, exactly; ii) the method used in its construction; and iii) relations between meaning and rationality. Essential to Kripke's puzzle is a normative notion of contradictory belief. Different positions about the meaning of names yield different views of what constitutes the attribution of contradictory belief; and Kripke's puzzle unwittingly _imports a Millian assumption. Accordingly, the puzzle about belief is not independent of positions about the meaning of names.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Bennett W. Helm (2009). The Import of Human Action. In Jesus Aguilar & Andrei Buckareff (eds.), Philosophy of Action. Automatic Press/Vip. 89--100.score: 9.0
    My central philosophical concern for many years has been with what it is to be a person. Of course, we persons are agents, indeed agents of a special sort, so understanding personhood has of course led me to think about that special sort of agency. Yet my background in the philosophy of mind leads me to think that any account of this special sort of agency must appeal to psychological capacities that are themselves grounded in an account of the relation (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Horacio Arló-Costa (2001). Bayesian Epistemology and Epistemic Conditionals: On the Status of the Export-Import Laws. Journal of Philosophy 98 (11):555-593.score: 9.0
    Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use, available at http://www.jstor.org/about/terms.html. JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use provides, in part, that unless you have obtained prior permission, you may not download an entire issue of a journal or multiple copies of articles, and you may use content in the JSTOR archive only for your personal, non-commercial use.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Rudolf A. Makkreel (1990). Imagination and Interpretation in Kant: The Hermeneutical Import of the Critique of Judgment. University of Chicago Press.score: 9.0
    In this illuminating study of Kant's theory of imagination and its role in interpretation, Rudolf A. Makkreel argues against the commonly held notion that Kant's transcendental philosophy is incompatible with hermeneutics. The charge that Kant's foundational philosophy is inadequate to the task of interpretation can be rebutted, explains Makkreel, if we fully understand the role of imagination in his work. In identifying this role, Makkreel also reevaluates the relationship among Kant's discussions of the feeling of life, common sense, and the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. B. Russell & Hugh MacColl (1905). The Existential Import of Propositions. Mind 14 (55):398-402.score: 9.0
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Mario Mignucci (2007). Aristotle on the Existential Import of Propositions. Phronesis 52 (2):121 - 138.score: 9.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Justin Skirry (2004). Descartes's Conceptual Distinction and its Ontological Import. Journal of the History of Philosophy 42 (2):121-144.score: 9.0
    : Descartes' conceptual distinction (or distinctio rationis) is commonly understood to be a distinction created by the mind's activity without a foundation in re. This paper challenges this understanding partially based on a letter to an unknown correspondent in which Descartes claims not to admit distinctions without a foundation. He goes on to claim that his conceptual distinction is not a distinctio rationis ratiocinantis (i.e. a distinction of reasoning reason) but is something like a formal distinction or, more precisely, a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Sandra D. Mitchell (2007). The Import of Uncertainty. The Pluralist 2 (1):58 - 71.score: 9.0
    In this paper I argue that two domains of uncertainty should inform our strategies for making social policy on new genetic technologies. The first is biological complexity, which includes both unknown consequences on known variables and unknown unknowns. The second is value pluralism, which includes both moral conflict and moral pluralism. This framework is used to investigate policy on genetically modified food and suggests that adaptive management is required to track changes in biological knowledge of these interventions and that less (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Karel Lambert (1963). Existential Import Revisited. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 4 (4):288-292.score: 9.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Horacio Arlo-Costa, Bayesian Epistemology and Epistemic Conditionals: On the Status of the Export-Import Laws.score: 9.0
    The notion of probability occupies a central role in contemporary epistemology and cognitive science. Nevertheless, the classical notion of probability is hard to reconcile with the central notions postulated by the epistemological tradition.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Colin Radford (1995). MacColl, Russell, the Existential Import of Propositions, and the Null- Class. Philosophical Quarterly 45 (180):316-331.score: 9.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Scott Carson (2000). Aristotle on Existential Import and Nonreferring Subjects. Synthese 124 (3):343-360.score: 9.0
1 — 50 / 1000