Search results for 'biophilosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Charles Wolfe (2015). Was Canguilhem a Biochauvinist? Goldstein, Canguilhem and the Project of Biophilosophy. In Medicine and Society, New Perspectives in Continental Philosophy. Springer Netherlands
    Georges Canguilhem is known to have regretted, with some pathos, that Life no longer serves as an orienting question in our scientific activity. He also frequently insisted on a kind of uniqueness of organisms and/or living bodies – their inherent normativity, their value-production and overall their inherent difference from mere machines. In addition, Canguilhem acknowledged a major debt to the German neurologist-theoretician Kurt Goldstein, author most famously of The Structure of the Organism in 1934; along with Merleau-Ponty, Canguilhem was the (...)
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  2.  11
    Charles Wolfe & Andy Wong, The Return of Vitalism: Canguilhem, Bergson and the Project of Biophilosophy.
    The eminent French biologist and historian of biology François Jacob once notoriously declared, “On n’interroge plus la vie dans les laboratoires” : 20-25): laboratory research no longer inquires into the notion of ‘Life’. In the mid-twentieth century, from the immediate post-war period to the late 1960s, French philosophers of science such as Georges Canguilhem, Raymond Ruyer and Gilbert Simondon returned to Jacob’s statement with an odd kind of pathos: they were determined to reverse course. Not by imposing a different kind (...)
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  3.  3
    Spyridon A. Koutroufinis (2014). Introduction: The Need for a New Biophilosophy. In Life and Process: Towards a New Biophilosophy. De Gruyter 1-36.
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  4. Charles T. Wolfe, The Return of Vitalism: Canguilhem and French Biophilosophy in the 1960s.
    The eminent French biologist and historian of biology, François Jacob, once notoriously declared “On n’interroge plus la vie dans les laboratoires”: laboratory research no longer inquires into the notion of ‘Life’. Nowadays, as David Hull puts it, “both scientists and philosophers take ontological reduction for granted… Organisms are ‘nothing but’ atoms, and that is that.” In the mid-twentieth century, from the immediate post-war period to the late 1960s, French philosophers of science such as Georges Canguilhem, Raymond Ruyer and Gilbert Simondon (...)
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  5.  4
    Charles T. Wolfe (2015). “Was Canguilhem a Biochauvinist? Goldstein, Canguilhem and the Project of ‘Biophilosophy’". In Darian Meacham (ed.), Medicine and Society, New Continental Perspectives (Dordrecht: Springer, Philosophy and Medicine Series, 2015). Springer 197-212.
    Canguilhem is known to have regretted, with some pathos, that Life no longer serves as an orienting question in our scientific activity. He also frequently insisted on a kind of uniqueness of organisms and/or living bodies – their inherent normativity, their value-production and overall their inherent difference from mere machines. In addition, Canguilhem acknowledged a major debt to the German neurologist-theoretician Kurt Goldstein, author most famously of The Structure of the Organism in 1934; along with Merleau-Ponty, Canguilhem was the main (...)
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  6. Bernhard Rensch (1971). Biophilosophy. New York,Columbia University Press.
  7. Bernhard Rensch (1972). Spinoza's Identity Theory and Modern Biophilosophy. Philosophical Forum 3 (2):193.
     
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  8.  1
    Michael Allen Fox (1988). Bridges Between Biology and Philosophy. Biophilosophy: Analytic and Holistic Perspectives. (1988). By Rolf Sattler. Springer, Berlin. Pp. Xvi+284. DM 66. [REVIEW] Bioessays 9 (4):138-139.
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  9. Stephen T. Asma (1994). Following Form and Function: Reflections on Nineteenth Century Biophilosophy. Dissertation, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale
    This work is an examination of the metaphysical presuppositions involved in the science of organic form. Taking the dichotomy of structuralism versus functionalism in nineteenth century biology as the central subject of my study, I explore a network of unquestioned premises and isolate areas where empirical research programs and underlying metaphysical commitments both inform and hinder each other. ;I begin with the Cuvier-Geoffroy debate of 1830--a debate that clearly articulates the tensions between structuralist and functionalist approaches to organic form. On (...)
     
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  10. Diego Cano Espinosa (2008). Autonomy of Biology and Non-Reductionism in the Biophilosophy of Francisco J. Ayala. Pensamiento 64 (240):267-287.
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  11.  7
    Spyridon A. Koutroufinis (ed.) (2014). Life and Process: Towards a New Biophilosophy. De Gruyter.
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  12. Bernhard Rensch (1971). Biophilosophy. Translated by C.A.M. Sym. --. Columbia University Press.
     
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  13. S. Spassov (1998). Metaphysics and Vitalism in Henri Bergson's Biophilosophy: A New Look. Analecta Husserliana 52:197-208.
     
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  14. Henryk Szarski (1990). The Validity of Biological Sciences. A Review of Rolf Sattler, "Biophilosophy. Analytic and Holistic Perspectives". [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 5 (1):93.
     
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  15. James L. Bernat (2002). The Biophilosophical Basis of Whole-Brain Death. Soc Philos Policy 19 (2):324-42.
    Notwithstanding these wise pronouncements, my project here is to characterize the biological phenomenon of death of the higher animal species, such as vertebrates. My claim is that the formulation of “whole- brain death ” provides the most congruent map for our correct understanding of the concept of death. This essay builds upon the foundation my colleagues and I have laid since 1981 to characterize the concept of death and refine when this event occurs. Although our society's well-accepted program of multiple (...)
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  16.  48
    Charles T. Wolfe, The Return of Vitalism.
    The eminent French biologist and historian of biology, François Jacob, once notoriously declared "On n‘interroge plus la vie dans les laboratoires": laboratory research no longer inquires into the notion of Life‘. Nowadays, as David Hull puts it, "both scientists and philosophers take ontological reduction for granted… Organisms are ‗nothing but‘ atoms, and that is that." In the mid-twentieth century, from the immediate post-war period to the late 1960s, French philosophers of science such as Georges Canguilhem, Raymond Ruyer and Gilbert Simondon (...)
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  17. Vanessa Nicola Labrea & Norman Roland Madarasz (2015). Organismo e função reguladora: determinações do vivo em Georges Canguilhem. Veritas 60 (2):242-263.
    O artigo compreende o cerne da obra de Georges Canguilhem como um ponto de cruzamento entre problemáticas fundamentalmente médico biológicas e problemáticas sócio-políticas. A consideração histórica descontinuísta do desenvolvimento de conceitos científicos e a classificação da técnica enquanto prótese do organismo vivo, entre outras particularidades, situam o pensamento canguilhemeano na fronteira entre áreas do conhecimento demarcadas separadamente. O que integra e individualiza o seu trabalho filosófico é a ponderação do vital enquanto categoria de base para intelecção e reconstrução de problemas (...)
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  18.  1
    David R. Griffin (2014). Evolution Without Tears: A Third Way Beyond Neo-Darwinism and Intelligent Design. In Spyridon A. Koutroufinis (ed.), Life and Process: Towards a New Biophilosophy. De Gruyter 255-274.
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  19.  41
    Henry P. Stapp (2014). The Effect of Mind Upon Brain. In Spyridon A. Koutroufinis (ed.), Life and Process: Towards a New Biophilosophy. De Gruyter 183-214.
    A physics-based understanding of how our conscious thoughts can affect our physically described brains is described. This understanding depends on the shift from the mechanical conception of nature that prevailed in science from the time of Isaac Newton until the dawn of the twentieth century to the psychophysical conception that emerged from the findings of Planck, Bohr, and Heisenberg.. This shift converted the role of our conscious thoughts from that of passive observers of a causally closed physically described universe to (...)
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  20.  5
    Barbara Muraca (2014). Teleology and the Life Sciences: Between Limit Concept and Ontological Necessity. In Spyridon A. Koutroufinis (ed.), Life and Process: Towards a New Biophilosophy. De Gruyter 37-72.
    Against the background of the current discussion about self-organization theories and complexity theories and their application within biology and ecology, the question of teleology gains a new significance. Some scholars insist on the total elimination of any reference to teleology from the realm of the natural sciences. However, it seems especially hard to eradicate teleological expressions from scientific language when the issue of understanding living beings is at stake. For this reason, other scholars opt for a middle path that allows (...)
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  21.  2
    Renate Falkner & Gernot Falkner (2014). The Experience of Environmental Phosphate Fluctuations by Cyanobacteria: An Essay on the Teleological Feature of Physiological Adaptation. In Spyridon A. Koutroufinis (ed.), Life and Process: Towards a New Biophilosophy. De Gruyter 73-98.
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  22.  2
    Pete A. Y. Gunter (2014). Quantum Biology: A Live Option. In Spyridon A. Koutroufinis (ed.), Life and Process: Towards a New Biophilosophy. De Gruyter 171-182.
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  23.  1
    Joseph E. Earley (2014). Life in the Interstices: Systems Biology and Process Thought. In Spyridon A. Koutroufinis (ed.), Life and Process: Towards a New Biophilosophy. De Gruyter 157-170.
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  24.  1
    Spyridon A. Koutroufinis (2014). Beyond Systems Theoretical Explanations of an Organism’s Becoming: A Process Philosophical Approach. In Life and Process: Towards a New Biophilosophy. De Gruyter 99-132.
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  25. John B. Cobb (2014). A Fourth Variable in Evolution. In Spyridon A. Koutroufinis (ed.), Life and Process: Towards a New Biophilosophy. De Gruyter 215-254.
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  26. Jonathan T. Delafield-Butt (2014). Process and Action: Whitehead’s Ontological Units and Perceptuomotor Control Units. In Spyridon A. Koutroufinis (ed.), Life and Process: Towards a New Biophilosophy. De Gruyter 133-156.
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  27. David Livingstone Smith (ed.) (2016). How Biology Shapes Philosophy: New Foundations for Naturalism. Cambridge University Press.
    How Biology Shapes Philosophy is a seminal contribution to the emerging field of biophilosophy. It brings together work by philosophers who draw on biology to address traditional and not so traditional philosophical questions and concerns. Thirteen essays by leading figures in the field explore the biological dimensions of ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, gender, semantics, rationality, representation, and consciousness, as well as the misappropriation of biology by philosophers, allowing the reader to critically interrogate the relevance of biology for philosophy. Both rigorous (...)
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  28. Robert J. Valenza (2014). Covariance and Evolution. In Spyridon A. Koutroufinis (ed.), Life and Process: Towards a New Biophilosophy. De Gruyter 275-306.
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  29. S. E. Wilmer & Audronė Žukauskaitė (eds.) (2015). Resisting Biopolitics: Philosophical, Political, and Performative Strategies. Routledge.
    The topic of biopolitics is a timely one, and it has become increasingly important for scholars to reconsider how life is objectified, mobilized, and otherwise bound up in politics. This cutting-edge volume discusses the philosophical, social, and political notions of biopolitics, as well as the ways in which biopower affects all aspects of our lives, including the relationships between the human and nonhuman, the concept of political subjectivity, and the connection between art, science, philosophy, and politics. In addition to tracing (...)
     
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