Search results for 'biopolitics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Robin James (2014). Neoliberal Noise: Attali, Foucault, & the Biopolitics of Uncool. Culture, Theory, and Critique 52 (2):138-158.
    Is it even possible to resist or oppose neoliberalism? I consider two responses that translate musical practices into counter-hegemonic political strategies: Jacques Attali’s theory of “composition” and the biopolitics of “uncool.” Reading Jacques Attali’s Noise through Foucault’s late work, I argue that Attali’s concept of “repetition” is best understood as a theory of neoliberal biopolitics, and his theory composition is actually a model of deregulated subjectivity. Composition is thus not an alternative to neoliberalism but its quintessence. An (...)
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  2.  50
    Catherine Mills (2011). Futures of Reproduction: Bioethics and Biopolitics. Springer.
    Issues in reproductive ethics, such as the capacity of parents to ‘choose children’, present challenges to philosophical ideas of freedom, responsibility and harm. This book responds to these challenges by proposing a new framework for thinking about the ethics of reproduction that emphasizes the ways that social norms affect decisions about who is born. The book provides clear and thorough discussions of some of the dominant problems in reproductive ethics - human enhancement and the notion of the normal, reproductive liberty (...)
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  3.  8
    Maarten Simons (2006). Learning as Investment: Notes on Governmentality and Biopolitics. Educational Philosophy and Theory 38 (4):523–540.
    The ‘European Space of Higher Education’ could be mapped as an infrastructure for entrepreneurship and a place where the distinction between the social and the economic becomes obsolete. Using Foucault's understanding of biopolitics and discussing the analyses of Agamben and Negri/Hardt it is argued that the actual governmental configuration, i.e. the economisation of the social, also has a biopolitical dimension. Focusing on the intersection between a politicisation and economisation of human life allows us to discuss a kind of ‘bio‐economisation’ (...)
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  4.  74
    Penelope Deutscher (2010). Reproductive Politics, Biopolitics and Auto-Immunity: From Foucault to Esposito. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (2):217-226.
    The contingent cultural, epistemological and ontological status of biology is highlighted by changes in attitudes towards reproductive politics in the history of feminist movements. Consider, for example, the American, British, and numerous European instances of feminist sympathy for eugenics at the turn of the century. This amounted to a specific formation of the role, in late nineteenth and early twentieth century feminisms, of concepts of biological risk and defence, which were transformed into the justificatory language of rights claims. In this (...)
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  5.  4
    Christopher R. Mayes & Donald B. Thompson (2015). What Should We Eat? Biopolitics, Ethics, and Nutritional Scientism. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (4):587-599.
    Public health advocates, government agencies, and commercial organizations increasingly use nutritional science to guide food choice and diet as a way of promoting health, preventing disease, or marketing products. We argue that in many instances such references to nutritional science can be characterized as nutritional scientism. We examine three manifestations of nutritional scientism: the simplification of complex science to increase the persuasiveness of dietary guidance, superficial and honorific references to science in order to justify cultural or ideological views about food (...)
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  6.  6
    Kristóf Fenyvesi (2014). Dionysian Biopolitics: Karl Kerényi's Concept of Indestructible Life. Comparative Philosophy 5 (2).
    Scholar of religion Karl Kerényi’s last book, Dionysos, is a grand attempt at reinterpreting ζωη ( zoe ), the Greek concept of indestructible life, which he distinguishes from βίος (bios), finite life. In Kerényi’s view, the meaning and sensual experience of zoe was expressed in its richest form in the Cretan beginnings of the cult of Dionysos. The major characteristics of this cult, as Kerényi describes, were beyond the cultural, political, and sexual limits of the Christian interpretations of life and (...)
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  7.  5
    Ada S. Jaarsma (2013). Kierkegaard, Biopolitics and Critique in the Present Age. The European Legacy 18 (7):850-866.
    This essay examines the relevance of Kierkegaard’s analysis of “the present age” for our own age, focusing specifically on the existential implications of neoliberalism and biopolitics. By examining the significance of Kierkegaard’s view of ethical and religious existence-stages, I argue that his concerns about leveling and despair bear directly upon pressing problems concerning sexuality, identity, and political exclusions. Kierkegaard becomes an ally of contemporary critical theory, and, in this alliance, Kierkegaard’s religious existentialism foregrounds the spiritual or religious dimensions of (...)
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  8.  8
    Alpar Losonc (2008). Biopolitics and/or Biopower. Filozofija I Društvo 19 (1):153-189.
    The author of this article thematizes the meanings of life in political philosophy. There are two answers to the question concerning the legitimacy of life in the political philosophy. The first, negative, answer is connected to Arendt, the second is connected to Michel Foucault who has delineated the genesis of the biopolitics in the Western tradition and argued that, since the classical age, "deduction" based on the practice of sovereign power has become merely one element in a range of (...)
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  9.  3
    Majia Holmer Nadesan (2011). The Biopolitics of Transactional Capitalism. Mediatropes 3 (1):23-57.
    In the spring of 2010, major newspapers in the U.S. announced arrival of a “recovery” from the economic recession precipitated by the 2008 financial crisis. This essay examines the biopolitics of recovery in the wake of the disaster capitalism of the financial meltdown, arguing that twentieth-century social welfare biopolitics that derived wealth from the populace have been replaced by new forms of financial power whose global circulations and convergences exploit wealth informatically and transactionally, rather than biopolitically, through devices (...)
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  10.  13
    Roberto Esposito (2012). Terms of the Political Community, Immunity, Biopolitics. Fordham University Press.
    An invaluable introduction to the breadth and rigor of Esposito's thought, the book will also welcome readers already familiar with Esposito's characteristic skill in overturning and breaking open the language of politics.
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  11.  23
    Lorenzo Chiesa & Alberto Toscano (eds.) (2009). The Italian Differences: Between Nihilism and Biopolitics. Re.Press.
    This volume brings together essays by different generations of Italian thinkers which address, whether in affirmative, problematizing or genealogical registers, ...
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  12. Shelley Tremain (2008). The Biopolitics of Bioethics and Disability. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (2/3):101-106.
  13. Stephen Morton & Stephen Bygrave (eds.) (2008). Foucault in an Age of Terror: Essays on Biopolitics and the Defence of Society. Palgrave Macmillan.
  14.  13
    Thomas Lemke (2005). “A Zone of Indistinction”–A Critique of Giorgio Agamben's Con-Cept of Biopolitics. Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 7 (1):3-13.
  15.  12
    Nicolae Morar & Colin Koopman (2012). The Birth of the Concept of Biopolitics – A Critical Notice of Lemke's Biopolitics. Theory and Event 15 (4).
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  16. Lisa Guenther (2012). Resisting Agamben: The Biopolitics of Shame and Humiliation. Philosophy and Social Criticism 38 (1):59-79.
    In Remnants of Auschwitz , Giorgio Agamben argues that the hidden structure of subjectivity is shame. In shame, I am consigned to something that cannot be assumed, such that the very thing that makes me a subject also forces me to witness my own desubjectification. Agamben’s ontological account of shame is problematic insofar as it forecloses collective responsibility and collapses the distinction between shame and humiliation. By recontextualizing three of Agamben’s sources – Primo Levi, Robert Antelme and Maurice Blanchot – (...)
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  17.  7
    J. P. Bishop (2008). Biopolitics, Terri Schiavo, and the Sovereign Subject of Death. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (6):538-557.
    Humanity does not gradually progress from combat to combat until it arrives at universal reciprocity, where the rule of law finally replaces warfare; humanity installs each of its violences in a system of rules and thus proceeds from domination to domination. (Foucault, 1984, 85)In this essay, I take a note from Michel Foucault regarding the notion of biopolitics. For Foucault, biopolitics has both repressive and constitutive properties. Foucault's claim is that with the rise of modern government, the state (...)
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  18. James Hughes (2010). Technoprogressive Biopolitics and Human Enhancement. In Jonathan D. Moreno & Sam Berger (eds.), Progress in Bioethics: Science, Policy, and Politics. MIT Press
    A principal challenge facing the progressive bioethics project is the crafting of a consistent message on biopolitical issues that divide progressives. -/- The regulation of enhancement technologies is one of the issues central to this emerging biopolitics, pitting progressive defenders of enhancement, “technoprogressives,” against progressive critics. This essay [PDF] will argue that technoprogressive biopolitics express the consistent application of the core progressive values of the Enlightenment: the right of individuals to control their own bodies, brains and reproduction according (...)
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  19. Timothy C. Campbell (2011). Improper Life: Technology and Biopolitics From Heidegger to Agamben. Univ of Minnesota Press.
    Has biopolitics actually become thanatopolitics, a field of study obsessed with death? Is there something about the nature of biopolitical thought today that makes it impossibile to deploy affirmatively? If this is true, what can life-minded thinkers put forward as the merits of biopolitical reflection? These questions drive Improper Life.Campbell argues that a "crypto-thanatopolitics" can be teased out of Heidegger's critique of technology and that some of the leading scholars of biopolitics---including Michel Foucault, Giorgio Agamben, and Peter Sloterdijk---have (...)
     
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  20.  16
    Alison Bashford (2006). Global Biopolitics and the History of World Health. History of the Human Sciences 19 (1):67-88.
    Many scholars have historicized biopolitics with reference to the emergence of sovereign nations and their colonial extensions over the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. This article begins to conceptualize and trace the history of biopolitics beyond the nation, arguing that the history of world health - the great 20th-century reach of 19th-century health and hygiene - should be understood as a vital politics of population on a newly large field of play. This substantive history of world health and (...)
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  21.  17
    Jeffrey P. Bishop (2008). Biopolitics, Terri Schiavo, and the Sovereign Subject of Death. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (6):538-557.
    Humanity does not gradually progress from combat to combat until it arrives at universal reciprocity, where the rule of law finally replaces warfare; humanity installs each of its violences in a system of rules and thus proceeds from domination to domination. In this essay, I take a note from Michel Foucault regarding the notion of biopolitics. For Foucault, biopolitics has both repressive and constitutive properties. Foucault's claim is that with the rise of modern government, the state became exceedingly (...)
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  22.  12
    M. T. Lysaught (2009). Docile Bodies: Transnational Research Ethics as Biopolitics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 34 (4):384-408.
    This essay explores the claim that bioethics has become a mode of biopolitics. It seeks to illuminate one of the myriad of ways that bioethics joins other institutionalized discursive practices in the task of producing, organizing, and managing the bodies—of policing and controlling populations—in order to empower larger institutional agents. The focus of this analysis is the contemporary practice of transnational biomedical research. The analysis is catalyzed by the enormous transformation in the political economy of transnational research that has (...)
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  23.  3
    C. Venn (2007). Cultural Theory, Biopolitics, and the Question of Power. Theory, Culture and Society 24 (3):111-124.
    This article displaces the terrain upon which the question of power in modern societies has been framed by reference to the concept of hegemony. It presents a genealogy of power which pays attention to what has been at stake in the shifts in the effectivity of the concept of hegemony for cultural theory from the 1960s, correlating the mutations in the analyses of power to shifts in the analysis of the relations of culture, politics and the economy. Questions of the (...)
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  24.  11
    Anthony Burke (2011). Humanity After Biopolitics. Angelaki 16 (4):101 - 114.
    Against the background of a profound critique of human rights, cosmopolitan universalism and humanistic political agency offered by writers as diverse as Giorgio Agamben, Hannah Arendt and Jenny Edkins, this essay seeks to recover and rethink the figure of humanity. Arguing that the critique of biopolitics and sovereignty unwittingly frustrates visions of human dignity and agency that can serve as a resource against its abuses, the essay argues that a vision of interdependent, indebted, and dispersed human being ? one (...)
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  25.  33
    Terry Flew (2012). Michel Foucault's The Birth of Biopolitics and Contemporary Neo-Liberalism Debates. Thesis Eleven 108 (1):44-65.
    Neo-liberalism has become one of the boom concepts of our time. From its original reference point as a descriptor of the economics of the ‘Chicago School’ or authors such as Friedrich von Hayek, neo-liberalism has become an all-purpose concept, explanatory device and basis for social critique. This presentation evaluates Michel Foucault’s 1978–79 lectures, published as The Birth of Biopolitics, to consider how he used the term neo-liberalism, and how this equates with its current uses in critical social and cultural (...)
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  26.  87
    John Protevi, The Terri Schiavo Case: Biopolitics and Biopower: Agamben and Foucault.
    While Agamben acknowledges the Arendtian and Foucaultian thesis of the modernity of biopower, he will claim that sovereignty and biopolitics are equally ancient and essentially intertwined in the originary gesture of all politics; sovereignty is the power to decide the state of exception whereby bare life or zoe is exposed "underneath" political life or bios. Agamben then finds in the concentration camp the modern biopolitical paradigm, in which the state of exception has become the rule and we have all (...)
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  27.  11
    Florelle D'Hoest & Tyson E. Lewis (2015). Exhausting the Fatigue University: In Search of a Biopolitics of Research. Ethics and Education 10 (1):49-60.
    Today it would seem that being fatigued is a fairly common physical and psychological effect of educational systems based on an increasing demand for high-yield performance quotas. In higher education, ‘publish or perish’ is a kind of imperative to perform, perform better, and perform optimally leading to an overall economy of fatigue. In this paper we provide a critical theory of what we are calling the ‘fatigue university.’ While highlighting the negative costs of fatigue, we also provide a philosophical distinction (...)
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  28.  3
    C. Venn (2009). Neoliberal Political Economy, Biopolitics and Colonialism: A Transcolonial Genealogy of Inequality. Theory, Culture and Society 26 (6):206-233.
    Foucault’s analysis of the relation of power and the economy in the lectures given at the Collège de France between 1975 and 1979 opens up modern societies for a radically different interrogation of the relations of force inscribed in historically heterogeneous forms of wealth creation and distribution, but more specifically within the period of liberal capitalism. Its vast scope clears the ground for genealogies of power, political economy and race that demonstrate their intertwinement, yet he underplays several elements which have (...)
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  29.  23
    Mark Ge Kelly (2010). International Biopolitics: Foucault, Globalisation and Imperialism. Theoria 57 (123):1-26.
    In this article, I present a new Foucauldian reading of the international, via Foucault's concept of 'biopolitics'. I begin by surveying the existing Foucauldian perspectives on the international, which mostly take as their point of departure Foucault's concept of 'governmentality', and mostly diagnose a 'global governmentality' or 'global biopolitics' in the current era of globalisation. Against these majority positions, I argue that analysis of the contemporary international through the lens of Foucauldian biopolitics in fact shows us that (...)
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  30.  48
    Jiangxia Yu & Jingwei Liu (2009). The New Biopolitics. Journal of Academic Ethics 7 (4):287-296.
    The biotech revolution profoundly changes and reconstructs the Foucaultian concept of biopolitics from different dimensions. It declares the coming of the Age of Biocapitalism, which opens a new pattern of modern power allocation of life governance and shows people two prospects simultaneously: utopian hopes and dystopian desperation. Biocapitalism has not only produced ethical degeneration and cultural shock, but more importantly, has opened new areas for political hegemony and economic aggression through the reconstruction of biopolitics, and the enhancement of (...)
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  31.  2
    Vanessa Lemm (2015). Nietzsche and biopolitics: Four Readings of Nietzsche as a biopolitical thinker. Ideas Y Valores 64 (158):223-248.
    La recepción durante el siglo XX se preguntó si la filosofía nietzscheana era a-, im- o anti-política, es decir, si podía ser asimilada por la democracia, o si era antimoderna, elitista y reaccionaria. El italiano Roberto Esposito ha propuesto leerla como formando e informando el paradigma de la biopolítica. Se discuten cuatro lecturas de esa biopolítica: como formadora del paradigma de la inmunidad, como tanatopolítica, como liberal y neoliberal, y como biopolítica afirmativa. Twentieth-century readers wondered if Nietzschean philosophy was apolitical, (...)
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  32.  48
    Robert Sinnerbrink (2005). From Machenschaft to Biopolitics: A Genealogical Critique of Biopower. Critical Horizons 6 (1):239-265.
    This paper develops a genealogical critique of the concepts of biopower and biopolitics in the work of Foucault and Agamben. It shows how Heidegger's reflections on Machenschaft or machination prefigure the concepts of biopower and biopolitics. It develops a critique of Foucault's account of biopolitics as a system of managing the biological life of populations culminating in neo-liberalism, and a critique of Agamben's presentation of biopolitics as the metaphysical foundation of Western political rationality. Foucault's ethical turn (...)
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  33.  11
    J. Cheney-Lippold (2011). A New Algorithmic Identity: Soft Biopolitics and the Modulation of Control. Theory, Culture and Society 28 (6):164-181.
    Marketing and web analytic companies have implemented sophisticated algorithms to observe, analyze, and identify users through large surveillance networks online. These computer algorithms have the capacity to infer categories of identity upon users based largely on their web-surfing habits. In this article I will first discuss the conceptual and theoretical work around code, outlining its use in an analysis of online categorization practices. The article will then approach the function of code at the level of the category, arguing that an (...)
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  34.  11
    André Duarte (2006). Heidegger and Foucault, Critics of Modernity: Humanism, Technics and Biopolitics. Trans/Form/Ação 29 (2):95-114.
    I intend to discuss Foucault's and Heidegger's critical diagnosis of Modernity emphasizing its continuities. Generally speaking, it is possible to argue that in Heidegger philosophical reflection assumes itself as essentially historical, while in Foucault's case historical investigation assumes itself as an essentially philosophical task. Although recognizing the differences between Foucault's and Heidegger's general theoretical approaches, I argue that both consider that, in order to understand who we are today, it is necessary to elaborate a critical understanding of Modernity. In both (...)
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  35. John Marks (2008). Michel Foucault : Biopolitics and Biology. In Stephen Morton & Stephen Bygrave (eds.), Foucault in an Age of Terror: Essays on Biopolitics and the Defence of Society. Palgrave Macmillan
     
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  36.  1
    Anke Snoek & Craig L. Fry (2015). Lessons in Biopolitics and Agency: Agamben on Addiction. The New Bioethics 21 (2):128-141.
    The concepts of ‘biopolitics’ and ‘naked life’ have become increasingly relevant in the debate on substance dependency due to the growing prominence of neuroscience in defining the nature of addiction1 and its threat to agency. However, these concepts are not necessarily well understood, and therefore may lead to oversight rather than insight. In this article we review the literature on Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben, whose founding works on both concepts shed a different light on addiction. We argue that the (...)
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  37.  10
    Claire Blencowe (2010). Foucault's and Arendt's 'Insider View' of Biopolitics: A Critique of Agamben. History of the Human Sciences 23 (5):113-130.
    This article revisits Arendt’s and Foucault’s converging accounts of modern (bio)politics and the entry of biological life into politics. Agamben’s influential account of these ideas is rejected as a misrepresentation both because it de-historicizes biological/organic life and because it occludes the positivity of that life and thus the discursive appeal and performative force of biopolitics. Through attention to the genealogy of Arendt’s and Foucault’s own ideas we will see that the major point of convergence in their thinking is their (...)
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  38.  7
    M. Gane (2008). Foucault on Governmentality and Liberalism: The Birth of Biopolitics: Lectures at the College de France, 1978--1979 by Michel Foucault, Trans. Graham Burchell Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2008, Pp. 346 Security, Territory, Population: Lectures at the College de France, 1977--1978 by Michel Foucault, Trans. Graham Burchell Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007, Pp. 401. [REVIEW] Theory, Culture and Society 25 (7-8):353-363.
    Foucault announced that his lectures of 1977—78 would be on `biopolitics'; in the end, they were on governmentality: from the pastoral of souls to the raison d'état . He announced his lectures of 1978—79 would also be on `biopolitics', but then presented lectures based on textual analysis, examining the way Smith and Ferguson invented a distinctive conception of civil society from that of Hobbes, Rousseau or Montesquieu, one that opened a site of civil society. These latter lectures continued (...)
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  39.  6
    Alexander V. Oleskin (2008). Biopolitics. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:517-523.
    Biopolitics, originally interpreted as the subfield of political science focusing on biological (evolutionary) factors involved in political behavior, has faced conceptual and organizational differences during the forty-year period of its development. It has recently been redefined as the totality of all applications of biology to social and political concepts, problems and practical issues and concerns. In these new terms, biopolitics represents a promising interdisciplinary area of research, whose potential with respect to political philosophy and political science is exemplified (...)
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  40.  6
    Laura Bazzicalupo & Clarissa Clò (2008). The Ambivalences of Biopolitics. Diacritics 36 (2):109-116.
    In this essay Laura Bazzicalupo surveys the contemporary biopolitical landscape from the war on terror to biotechnology to migration. Characterizing the biopolitical chiefly as a move from the juridical toward the normalizing, Bazzicalupo both critiques recent neomaterialist theorizations of biopower as vitalist and singles out some currents of feminist thought for their modern, anticommunitarian bias. A discussion of Arendt's analysis of depoliticization is then taken up from the perspective of immunity, one indebted to the thought of Roberto Esposito. She concludes (...)
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  41.  7
    Gordon Hull (2013). Biopolitics Is Not (Primarily) About Life: On Biopolitics, Neoliberalism, and Families. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 27 (3):322-335.
    The emergence of topics such as reprogenetics and genetic testing for hereditary diseases attests to the continued salience of Foucault's analyses of biopolitics. His various discussions pose at least two problems for contemporary appropriation of the work. First, it is unclear what the "life" on which biopolitics operates actually refers to.1 Second, it is unclear how biopolitics relates to the economy, either in the classical form of the family/household (oikos) or in the current form of neoliberalism.2 In (...)
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  42.  4
    T. Terranova (2009). Another Life: The Nature of Political Economy in Foucault's Genealogy of Biopolitics. Theory, Culture and Society 26 (6):234-262.
    The article focuses on the relation established by Foucault in the two lecture courses Security, Territory, Population and The Birth of Biopolitics between life, nature and political economy. It explores the ways in which liberalism constructs a notion of economic nature as a phenomenon of circulation of aleatory series of events and poses the latter as an internal limit to sovereign power. It argues that the entwinement of vital and economic processes provides the means of internal redefinition of the (...)
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  43.  6
    Alex Houen (2008). Sovereignty, Biopolitics and the Use of Literature : Michel Foucault and Kathy Acker. In Stephen Morton & Stephen Bygrave (eds.), Foucault in an Age of Terror: Essays on Biopolitics and the Defence of Society. Palgrave Macmillan
  44.  5
    D. Macey (2009). Rethinking Biopolitics, Race and Power in the Wake of Foucault. Theory, Culture and Society 26 (6):186-205.
    This article examines the ambivalences in Foucault’s elaboration of the concept of biopower and biopolitics. From the beginning, he relates the idea of a power over life to struggle and war, and so to race. In the period of the formation of the nation-state, threats to the unity and strength of the population were thought to come from a contagion by an alien element. In this context, tropes of race became aligned with the ‘sciences and technologies of the social’ (...)
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  45.  3
    Clare Hanson (2008). Biopolitics, Biological Racism and Eugenics. In Stephen Morton & Stephen Bygrave (eds.), Foucault in an Age of Terror: Essays on Biopolitics and the Defence of Society. Palgrave Macmillan
  46.  2
    Thomas Foth (2013). Understanding 'Caring' Through Biopolitics: The Case of Nurses Under the Nazi Regime. Nursing Philosophy 14 (4):284-294.
    These days, discussions of what might be the ‘essence’ or the ‘core’ of nursing and nursing practice sooner or later end in a discussion about the concept of care. Most of the ‘newer’ nursing theories use this concept as a theoretical core concept. Even though these theoretical approaches use the concept of care with very different philosophical foundations and theoretical consistency, they concur in defining care as the essence of nursing and thereby glorify goodness as the decisive characteristic of nursing. (...)
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  47. Timothy Campbell & Adam Sitze (eds.) (2013). Biopolitics: A Reader. Duke University Press Books.
    This anthology collects the texts that defined the concept of biopolitics, which has become so significant throughout the humanities and social sciences today. The far-reaching influence of the biopolitical—the relation of politics to life, or the state to the body—is not surprising given its centrality to matters such as healthcare, abortion, immigration, and the global distribution of essential medicines and medical technologies. Michel Foucault gave new and unprecedented meaning to the term "biopolitics" in his 1976 essay "Right of (...)
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  48. Timothy Campbell & Adam Sitze (eds.) (2013). Biopolitics: A Reader. Duke University Press Books.
    This anthology collects the texts that defined the concept of biopolitics, which has become so significant throughout the humanities and social sciences today. The far-reaching influence of the biopolitical—the relation of politics to life, or the state to the body—is not surprising given its centrality to matters such as healthcare, abortion, immigration, and the global distribution of essential medicines and medical technologies. Michel Foucault gave new and unprecedented meaning to the term "biopolitics" in his 1976 essay "Right of (...)
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  49. Timothy Campbell (ed.) (2008). Bios: Biopolitics and Philosophy. Univ of Minnesota Press.
    Roberto Esposito is one of the most prolific and important exponents of contemporary Italian political theory. Bíos -his first book to be translated into English-builds on two decades of highly regarded thought, including his thesis that the modern individual-with all of its civil and political rights as well as its moral powers-is an attempt to attain immunity from the contagion of the extraindividual, namely, the community. In Bíos, Esposito applies such a paradigm of immunization to the analysis of the radical (...)
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  50. Miguel de Beistegui, Giuseppe Bianco & Marjorie Gracieuse (eds.) (2014). The Care of Life: Transdisciplinary Perspectives in Bioethics and Biopolitics. Rowman & Littlefield International.
    The Care of Life: Transdisciplinary Perspectives in Bioethics and Biopolitics is a striking collection of interdisciplinary essays exploring key debates in, and the relationship between, bioethics and biopolitics.
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