Search results for 'biopolitics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Penelope Deutscher (2010). Reproductive Politics, Biopolitics and Auto-Immunity: From Foucault to Esposito. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (2):217-226.score: 18.0
    The contingent cultural, epistemological and ontological status of biology is highlighted by changes in attitudes towards reproductive politics in the history of feminist movements. Consider, for example, the American, British, and numerous European instances of feminist sympathy for eugenics at the turn of the century. This amounted to a specific formation of the role, in late nineteenth and early twentieth century feminisms, of concepts of biological risk and defence, which were transformed into the justificatory language of rights claims. In this (...)
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  2. Catherine Mills (2011). Futures of Reproduction: Bioethics and Biopolitics. Springer.score: 18.0
    Issues in reproductive ethics, such as the capacity of parents to ‘choose children’, present challenges to philosophical ideas of freedom, responsibility and harm. This book responds to these challenges by proposing a new framework for thinking about the ethics of reproduction that emphasizes the ways that social norms affect decisions about who is born. The book provides clear and thorough discussions of some of the dominant problems in reproductive ethics - human enhancement and the notion of the normal, reproductive liberty (...)
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  3. Robin James (2014). Neoliberal Noise: Attali, Foucault, & the Biopolitics of Uncool. Culture, Theory, and Critique 52 (2):138-158.score: 18.0
    Is it even possible to resist or oppose neoliberalism? I consider two responses that translate musical practices into counter-hegemonic political strategies: Jacques Attali’s theory of “composition” and the biopolitics of “uncool.” Reading Jacques Attali’s Noise through Foucault’s late work, I argue that Attali’s concept of “repetition” is best understood as a theory of neoliberal biopolitics, and his theory composition is actually a model of deregulated subjectivity. Composition is thus not an alternative to neoliberalism but its quintessence. An aesthetics (...)
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  4. Majia Holmer Nadesan (2011). The Biopolitics of Transactional Capitalism. Mediatropes 3 (1):23-57.score: 18.0
    In the spring of 2010, major newspapers in the U.S. announced arrival of a “recovery” from the economic recession precipitated by the 2008 financial crisis. This essay examines the biopolitics of recovery in the wake of the disaster capitalism of the financial meltdown, arguing that twentieth-century social welfare biopolitics that derived wealth from the populace have been replaced by new forms of financial power whose global circulations and convergences exploit wealth informatically and transactionally, rather than biopolitically, through devices (...)
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  5. Kristóf Fenyvesi (2014). Dionysian Biopolitics: Karl Kerényi's Concept of Indestructible Life. Comparative Philosophy 5 (2).score: 18.0
    Scholar of religion Karl Kerényi’s last book, Dionysos, is a grand attempt at reinterpreting ζωη ( zoe ), the Greek concept of indestructible life, which he distinguishes from βίος (bios), finite life. In Kerényi’s view, the meaning and sensual experience of zoe was expressed in its richest form in the Cretan beginnings of the cult of Dionysos. The major characteristics of this cult, as Kerényi describes, were beyond the cultural, political, and sexual limits of the Christian interpretations of life and (...)
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  6. Lorenzo Chiesa & Alberto Toscano (eds.) (2009). The Italian Differences: Between Nihilism and Biopolitics. Re.Press.score: 15.0
    This volume brings together essays by different generations of Italian thinkers which address, whether in affirmative, problematizing or genealogical registers, ...
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  7. Maarten Simons (2006). Learning as Investment: Notes on Governmentality and Biopolitics. Educational Philosophy and Theory 38 (4):523–540.score: 15.0
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  8. Roberto Esposito (2012). Terms of the Political Community, Immunity, Biopolitics. Fordham University Press.score: 15.0
    An invaluable introduction to the breadth and rigor of Esposito's thought, the book will also welcome readers already familiar with Esposito's characteristic skill in overturning and breaking open the language of politics.
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  9. Thomas Lemke (2005). “A Zone of Indistinction”–A Critique of Giorgio Agamben's Con-Cept of Biopolitics. Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 7 (1):3-13.score: 15.0
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  10. Nicolae Morar & Colin Koopman (2012). The Birth of the Concept of Biopolitics – A Critical Notice of Lemke's Biopolitics. Theory and Event 15 (4).score: 15.0
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  11. Alpar Losonc (2008). Biopolitics and/or Biopower. Filozofija I Drustvo 19 (1):153-189.score: 15.0
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  12. Stephen Morton & Stephen Bygrave (eds.) (2008). Foucault in an Age of Terror: Essays on Biopolitics and the Defence of Society. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 15.0
     
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  13. Jiangxia Yu & Jingwei Liu (2009). The New Biopolitics. Journal of Academic Ethics 7 (4):287-296.score: 14.0
    The biotech revolution profoundly changes and reconstructs the Foucaultian concept of biopolitics from different dimensions. It declares the coming of the Age of Biocapitalism, which opens a new pattern of modern power allocation of life governance and shows people two prospects simultaneously: utopian hopes and dystopian desperation. Biocapitalism has not only produced ethical degeneration and cultural shock, but more importantly, has opened new areas for political hegemony and economic aggression through the reconstruction of biopolitics, and the enhancement of (...)
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  14. Lisa Guenther (2012). Resisting Agamben: The Biopolitics of Shame and Humiliation. Philosophy and Social Criticism 38 (1):59-79.score: 12.0
    In Remnants of Auschwitz , Giorgio Agamben argues that the hidden structure of subjectivity is shame. In shame, I am consigned to something that cannot be assumed, such that the very thing that makes me a subject also forces me to witness my own desubjectification. Agamben’s ontological account of shame is problematic insofar as it forecloses collective responsibility and collapses the distinction between shame and humiliation. By recontextualizing three of Agamben’s sources – Primo Levi, Robert Antelme and Maurice Blanchot – (...)
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  15. James Hughes (2010). Technoprogressive Biopolitics and Human Enhancement. In Jonathan D. Moreno & Sam Berger (eds.), Progress in Bioethics: Science, Policy, and Politics. Mit Press.score: 12.0
    A principal challenge facing the progressive bioethics project is the crafting of a consistent message on biopolitical issues that divide progressives. -/- The regulation of enhancement technologies is one of the issues central to this emerging biopolitics, pitting progressive defenders of enhancement, “technoprogressives,” against progressive critics. This essay [PDF] will argue that technoprogressive biopolitics express the consistent application of the core progressive values of the Enlightenment: the right of individuals to control their own bodies, brains and reproduction according (...)
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  16. John Protevi, The Terri Schiavo Case: Biopolitics and Biopower: Agamben and Foucault.score: 12.0
    While Agamben acknowledges the Arendtian and Foucaultian thesis of the modernity of biopower, he will claim that sovereignty and biopolitics are equally ancient and essentially intertwined in the originary gesture of all politics; sovereignty is the power to decide the state of exception whereby bare life or zoe is exposed "underneath" political life or bios. Agamben then finds in the concentration camp the modern biopolitical paradigm, in which the state of exception has become the rule and we have all (...)
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  17. Robert Sinnerbrink (2005). From Machenschaft to Biopolitics: A Genealogical Critique of Biopower. Critical Horizons 6 (1):239-265.score: 12.0
    This paper develops a genealogical critique of the concepts of biopower and biopolitics in the work of Foucault and Agamben. It shows how Heidegger's reflections on Machenschaft or machination prefigure the concepts of biopower and biopolitics. It develops a critique of Foucault's account of biopolitics as a system of managing the biological life of populations culminating in neo-liberalism, and a critique of Agamben's presentation of biopolitics as the metaphysical foundation of Western political rationality. Foucault's ethical turn (...)
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  18. M. T. Lysaught (2009). Docile Bodies: Transnational Research Ethics as Biopolitics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 34 (4):384-408.score: 12.0
    This essay explores the claim that bioethics has become a mode of biopolitics. It seeks to illuminate one of the myriad of ways that bioethics joins other institutionalized discursive practices in the task of producing, organizing, and managing the bodies—of policing and controlling populations—in order to empower larger institutional agents. The focus of this analysis is the contemporary practice of transnational biomedical research. The analysis is catalyzed by the enormous transformation in the political economy of transnational research that has (...)
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  19. Anthony Burke (2011). Humanity After Biopolitics. Angelaki 16 (4):101 - 114.score: 12.0
    Against the background of a profound critique of human rights, cosmopolitan universalism and humanistic political agency offered by writers as diverse as Giorgio Agamben, Hannah Arendt and Jenny Edkins, this essay seeks to recover and rethink the figure of humanity. Arguing that the critique of biopolitics and sovereignty unwittingly frustrates visions of human dignity and agency that can serve as a resource against its abuses, the essay argues that a vision of interdependent, indebted, and dispersed human being ? one (...)
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  20. Simona Forti (2006). The Biopolitics of Souls: Racism, Nazism, and Plato. Political Theory 34 (1):9 - 32.score: 12.0
    This essay focuses on the relationship between biopolitics and race theory. Starting from Foucault, many authors have considered totalitarian anti-Semitism as a depravity of biologism. This essay would like to challenge this all-too-simple positivist, materialist, and evolutionist picture of biopolitics in the Third Reich. It examines another "tradition" of racial theories, central to National Socialism, much closer to the revered Western philosophical tradition than Darwinism ever was. This kind of racism presents itself as the authentic heir of that (...)
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  21. J. P. Bishop (2008). Biopolitics, Terri Schiavo, and the Sovereign Subject of Death. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (6):538-557.score: 12.0
    Humanity does not gradually progress from combat to combat until it arrives at universal reciprocity, where the rule of law finally replaces warfare; humanity installs each of its violences in a system of rules and thus proceeds from domination to domination. (Foucault, 1984, 85)In this essay, I take a note from Michel Foucault regarding the notion of biopolitics. For Foucault, biopolitics has both repressive and constitutive properties. Foucault's claim is that with the rise of modern government, the state (...)
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  22. Claire Blencowe (2010). Foucault's and Arendt's 'Insider View' of Biopolitics: A Critique of Agamben. History of the Human Sciences 23 (5):113-130.score: 12.0
    This article revisits Arendt’s and Foucault’s converging accounts of modern (bio)politics and the entry of biological life into politics. Agamben’s influential account of these ideas is rejected as a misrepresentation both because it de-historicizes biological/organic life and because it occludes the positivity of that life and thus the discursive appeal and performative force of biopolitics. Through attention to the genealogy of Arendt’s and Foucault’s own ideas we will see that the major point of convergence in their thinking is their (...)
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  23. Alison Bashford (2006). Global Biopolitics and the History of World Health. History of the Human Sciences 19 (1):67-88.score: 12.0
    Many scholars have historicized biopolitics with reference to the emergence of sovereign nations and their colonial extensions over the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. This article begins to conceptualize and trace the history of biopolitics beyond the nation, arguing that the history of world health - the great 20th-century reach of 19th-century health and hygiene - should be understood as a vital politics of population on a newly large field of play. This substantive history of world health and (...)
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  24. Terry Flew (2012). Michel Foucault's The Birth of Biopolitics and Contemporary Neo-Liberalism Debates. Thesis Eleven 108 (1):44-65.score: 12.0
    Neo-liberalism has become one of the boom concepts of our time. From its original reference point as a descriptor of the economics of the ‘Chicago School’ or authors such as Friedrich von Hayek, neo-liberalism has become an all-purpose concept, explanatory device and basis for social critique. This presentation evaluates Michel Foucault’s 1978–79 lectures, published as The Birth of Biopolitics, to consider how he used the term neo-liberalism, and how this equates with its current uses in critical social and cultural (...)
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  25. Gordon Hull (2013). Biopolitics Is Not (Primarily) About Life: On Biopolitics, Neoliberalism, and Families. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 27 (3):322-335.score: 12.0
    The emergence of topics such as reprogenetics and genetic testing for hereditary diseases attests to the continued salience of Foucault's analyses of biopolitics. His various discussions pose at least two problems for contemporary appropriation of the work. First, it is unclear what the "life" on which biopolitics operates actually refers to.1 Second, it is unclear how biopolitics relates to the economy, either in the classical form of the family/household (oikos) or in the current form of neoliberalism.2 In (...)
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  26. Alex Houen (2008). Sovereignty, Biopolitics and the Use of Literature : Michel Foucault and Kathy Acker. In Stephen Morton & Stephen Bygrave (eds.), Foucault in an Age of Terror: Essays on Biopolitics and the Defence of Society. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 12.0
  27. Alexander V. Oleskin (2008). Biopolitics. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:517-523.score: 12.0
    Biopolitics, originally interpreted as the subfield of political science focusing on biological (evolutionary) factors involved in political behavior, has faced conceptual and organizational differences during the forty-year period of its development. It has recently been redefined as the totality of all applications of biology to social and political concepts, problems and practical issues and concerns. In these new terms, biopolitics represents a promising interdisciplinary area of research, whose potential with respect to political philosophy and political science is exemplified (...)
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  28. Clare Hanson (2008). Biopolitics, Biological Racism and Eugenics. In Stephen Morton & Stephen Bygrave (eds.), Foucault in an Age of Terror: Essays on Biopolitics and the Defence of Society. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 12.0
  29. John Marks (2008). Michel Foucault : Biopolitics and Biology. In Stephen Morton & Stephen Bygrave (eds.), Foucault in an Age of Terror: Essays on Biopolitics and the Defence of Society. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 12.0
     
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  30. Catherine Mills (2006). Life Beyond Law: Biopolitics, Law and Futurity in Coetzee's 'Life and Times of Michael K'. Griffith Law Review 15 (1):177--195.score: 12.0
    JM Coetzee has on several occasions been criticised for his failure to elaborate a political vision of transformation beyond the social and political conditions that he describes in his novels. Focusing on the novel ’Life and Times of Michael K’, I argue that this criticism fails to appreciate the conception of political futurity that is evident in Coetzee’s novels. For there emerges in Michael K a gesture of hope in which turning away from history is the condition of possibility for (...)
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  31. S. E. Wilmer & Audronė Žukauskaitė (eds.) (2015). Resisting Biopolitics: Philosophical, Political, and Performative Strategies. Routledge.score: 12.0
    The topic of biopolitics is a timely one, and it has become increasingly important for scholars to reconsider how life is objectified, mobilized, and otherwise bound up in politics. This cutting-edge volume discusses the philosophical, social, and political notions of biopolitics, as well as the ways in which biopower affects all aspects of our lives, including the relationships between the human and nonhuman, the concept of political subjectivity, and the connection between art, science, philosophy, and politics. In addition (...)
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  32. Emmanuel Renault (2006). Biopolitics and Social Pathologies. Critical Horizons 7 (1):159-177.score: 10.0
    The question of social medicine provides the opportunity to engage in a critical reading of Foucault's theory of biopower. The analyses dedicated by Foucault to `the birth of social medicine' represent one of the few examples of a thorough application of that theory. They allow Foucault to show the heuristic value of the biopolitical hypothesis at the level of the most concrete historical materiality, and not just at that of the general history of the forms of governmentality. These analyses, however, (...)
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  33. Éric Alliez (2013). Ontology of the Diagram and Biopolitics of Philosophy. A Research Programme on Transdisciplinarity. Deleuze Studies 7 (2):217-230.score: 10.0
    In this article, the diagram is used to chart the movement from Deleuze's transcendental empiricism and engagement with structuralism in the 1960s to Deleuze and Guattari's ethico-aesthetic constructivism of the 1970s and 1980s. This is shown to culminate in a biopolitical critique and decoding of philosophy, which is part of the unfolding of a transdisciplinary research programme where art is seen to come ontologically ahead of philosophy.
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  34. Davide Tarizzo (forthcoming). Biopolitics and the Ideology of 'Mental Health'. Filozofski Vestnik.score: 10.0
    Modern political power has two branches: the sovereign and the biopolitical. With the former, the state makes laws, with the latter, it governs. Of the two branches of modern power, the sovereign and the biopolitical, this essay attempts to thematise only the latter, trying in particular to emphasise the de-subjectifying effects of biopolitical rationality and focusing on the three levels of biopolitical rationality: its economistic matrix, its epidemiological apparatus, and its ideological order. By briefly analysing these three levels, or registers, (...)
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  35. Thomas Biebricher (2011). The Biopolitics of Ordoliberalism. Foucault Studies 12:171-191.score: 10.0
    This article examines the biopolitical dimension in ordoliberal thought using Wilhelm Röpke and Alexander Rüstow as exemplary figures of this tradition. Based on an explication of various biopolitical themes that can be extracted from Foucault’s writings and lectures the article argues that these biopolitical themes, although rarely touched on in Foucault’s lectures on ordoliberal governmentality, nevertheless constitute an integral aspect of the thought of Röpke and Rüstow. From the regulation of the population through the strategic lever of the family to (...)
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  36. Johanna Oksala (2010). Violence and the Biopolitics of Modernity. Foucault Studies 10:23-43.score: 10.0
    The paper studies the relationship between political violence and biological life in the thought of Hannah Arendt, Giorgio Agamben and Michel Foucault. I follow Foucault in arguing that understanding political violence in modernity means rethinking the ontological boundary between biological and political life that has fundamentally ordered the Western tradition of political thought. I show that while Arendt, Agamben and Foucault all see the merging of the categories of life and politics as the key problem of Modernity, they understand this (...)
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  37. Wade Roberts (2010). Genetic Enhancement and the Biopolitical Horizon of Class Conflict. Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 18 (1):27-42.score: 10.0
    In this paper I argue that the widespread use of liberal eugenics would establish a biopolitical horizon for class conflict. In the course of my discussion, I examine Foucault’s discussion of the origins of class racism in Society Must Be Defended . I then turn to an examination of how a widespread use of genetic engineering could aggravate class divisions and produce new forms of class racism. I conclude the essay with an overview of the political options which are available (...)
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  38. Tero Auvinen (2010). At the Intersection of Sovereignty and Biopolitics: The Di-Polaric Spatializations of Money. Foucault Studies 9:5-34.score: 10.0
    The paper explores the incentive structures and the structurally rigid social hierarchies inherent in the polarizing logic of modern credit money and the mutual constitution of money’s sovereign and biopolitical dimensions. It is argued that the monetary system constitutes a major transitory channel for the logic of financial capital to transcend the limitations of sovereign spaces and to transform itself into a biopolitical force. The relationship between the material and the subjective – or the sovereign and the biopolitical – dimensions (...)
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  39. Mary K. Bryson & Jackie Stacey (2013). Cancer Knowledge in the Plural: Queering the Biopolitics of Narrative and Affective Mobilities. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 34 (2):197-212.score: 10.0
    In this age of DIY Health—a present that has been described as a time of “ludic capitalism”—one is constantly confronted with the injunction to manage risk by means of making healthy choices and of informed participation in various self-surveillant technologies of bioinformatics. Neoliberal governmentality has been redacted by poststructuralist scholars of bioethics as defined by the two-fold emergence of, on the one hand, populations and on the other, the self-determining individual—as biopolitical entities. In this article, we provide a genealogical-phenomenological schematization (...)
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  40. Shelley Tremain (2008). The Biopolitics of Bioethics and Disability. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (2/3):101-106.score: 9.0
  41. Ursula Naue & Thilo Kroll (2009). 'The Demented Other': Identity and Difference in Dementia. Nursing Philosophy 10 (1):26-33.score: 9.0
    This paper explores the impact of the concepts of identity and difference on demented persons (especially on persons with Alzheimer's disease). The diagnosis of dementia is often synonymous with the assertion that demented individuals are no longer capable of making reasonable decisions. But rationality is an important aspect of characterizing a person's identity. Hence, this prevailing image of dementia as a loss of self and a change of identity leads to the situation that demented persons represent difference and otherness. Here, (...)
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  42. Sarah K. Hansen (2013). Julia Kristeva and the Politics of Life. Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 21 (1):27-42.score: 9.0
    In her recent writings on the powers and limits of psychoanalysis, Julia Kristeva develops a theory of power and subjectivity that engages implicitly, if not explicitly, with biopolitical themes. Exploring these engagements, this paper draws on Kristeva to discuss the mute symptoms of homo sacer and the regulatory power of the spectacle. Staging an uncommon (and sometimes antagonistic) conversation between Kristeva, Agamben, and Foucault, I construct a field of inquiry that I term the “psychic life of biopolitics.”.
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  43. Frédéric Gros (2013). Y a-T-Il Un Sujet Biopolitique? Nóema 4 (4-1).score: 9.0
    This article explores the link between liberalism and biopolitics in Foucault, through the analyses of the 1979 Lecture at the Collège de France The Birth of Biopolitics.
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  44. Lorenzo Chiesa (2011). Biopolitics in Early Twenty-First-Century Italian Theory. Angelaki 16 (3):1 - 5.score: 9.0
    Angelaki, Volume 16, Issue 3, Page 1-5, September 2011.
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  45. R. Farneti (2011). The Immunitary Turn in Current Talk on Biopolitics: On Roberto Esposito's Bios. Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (8):955-962.score: 9.0
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  46. Machiel Keestra, How Do Narratives and Brains Mutually Influence Each Other? Taking Both the ‘Neuroscientific Turn’ and the ‘Narrative Turn’ in Explaining Bio-Political Orders.score: 9.0
    The observation that brains and political orders are interdependent is almost trivial. Obviously, political orders require brain processes in order to emerge and to remain in place, as these processes enable action and cognition. Conversely, ever since Aristotle coined man as “by nature a political animal” (Aristotle, Pol.: 1252a 3; cf. Eth. Nic.: 1097b 11), this also suggests that the political engagements of this animal has likely consequences for its natural development, including the development of its psychological functions. Given these (...)
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  47. Jeffrey P. Bishop & Fabrice Jotterand (2006). Bioethics as Biopolitics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (3):205 – 212.score: 9.0
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  48. Jeffrey P. Bishop (2008). Biopolitics, Terri Schiavo, and the Sovereign Subject of Death. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (6):538-557.score: 9.0
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  49. J. P. Bishop & D. R. Morrison (2011). The Roman Catholic Church, Biopolitics, and the Vegetative State. Christian Bioethics 17 (2):165-184.score: 9.0
    Compelled by recent public and politicized cases in which withdrawal of nutrition and hydration were at issue, this essay examines recent Church statements and argues that the distinction between private and public forms of human life is being lost. Effacing the distinction between the sphere of the home (oikos), where the maintenance of life (zoē) occurs, and the city (polis), where political and public life (bios) occurs, may have unforeseen and unwanted consequences. Through their well-intentioned efforts to preserve the sanctity (...)
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  50. Nancy Scheper-Hughes & Loïc J. D. Wacquant (eds.) (2002). Commodifying Bodies. Sage Publications.score: 9.0
    Increasingly the body is a possession that does not belong to us. It is bought and sold, bartered and stolen, marketed wholesale or in parts. The professions - especially reproductive medicine, transplant surgery, and bioethics but also journalism and other cultural specialists - have been pliant partners in this accelerating commodification of live and dead human organisms. Under the guise of healing or research, they have contributed to a new 'ethic of parts' for which the divisible body is severed from (...)
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