Search results for 'bureaucracy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Graham Button, David Martin, Jacki O'Neill & Tommaso Colombino (2012). Lifting the Mantle of Protection From Weber's Presuppositions in His Theory of Bureaucracy. Human Studies 35 (2):235-262.score: 24.0
    Early reactions to the publication of Harold Garfinkel's Studies in Ethnomethodology, which have persisted over the passing decades, was that ethnomethodology could not address what sociology deemed to be socially significant matters such as 'power' and 'the state'. This, however, is not the case. How such matters enter into the practical everyday affairs of members is of equal interest to ethnomethodology when compared to how any matter enters into members' everyday life, and how they display that. It just does not (...)
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  2. Paul B. de Laat (2012). NAVIGATING BETWEEN CHAOS AND BUREAUCRACY: BACKGROUNDING TRUST IN OPEN-CONTENT COMMUNITIES. In Karl Aberer, Andreas Flache, Wander Jager, Ling Liu, Jie Tang & Christophe Guéret (eds.), 4th International Conference, SocInfo 2012, Lausanne, Switzerland, December 5-7, 2012. Proceedings. Springer.score: 21.0
    Many virtual communities that rely on user-generated content (such as social news sites, citizen journals, and encyclopedias in particular) offer unrestricted and immediate ‘write access’ to every contributor. It is argued that these communities do not just assume that the trust granted by that policy is well-placed; they have developed extensive mechanisms that underpin the trust involved (‘backgrounding’). These target contributors (stipulating legal terms of use and developing etiquette, both underscored by sanctions) as well as the contents contributed by them (...)
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  3. L. J. Hume (1981). Bentham and Bureaucracy. Cambridge University Press.score: 21.0
    Most accounts of Jeremy Bentham (1748-1832) deal with him as a prophet of either utilitarianism or of liberal democracy. This book discusses a less familiar but very important aspect of his political thought: his theory of how government institutions should be organised in order to function as efficient and yet responsive guardians of the community's interests. It thus focuses on his programme for he executive and judicial branches of government rather than for the legislature and the electorate. Dr Hume suggests (...)
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  4. Sadao Tamura & Minoru Tokita (eds.) (2004). Symbiosis of Government and Market: The Private, the Public, and Bureaucracy. Routledgecurzon.score: 21.0
    In this volume, a group of international scholars address issues relating to community well being and the role of politics, law and economics in Europe and Japan in achieving human-centered symbiotic governance. Case-studies and suggestions for reform are presented in the arenas of economy, government administration, management, university governance, health, agriculture, the environment and urban planning.
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  5. Elizabeth Anderson (2008). Expanding the Egalitarian Toolbox: Equality and Bureaucracy. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 82 (1):139-160.score: 18.0
    Many problems of inequality in developing countries resist treatment by formal egalitarian policies. To deal with these problems, we must shift from a distributive to a relational conception of equality, founded on opposition to social hierarchy. Yet the production of many goods requires the coordination of wills by means of commands. In these cases, egalitarians must seek to tame rather than abolish hierarchy. I argue that bureaucracy offers important constraints on command hierarchies that help promote the equality of workers (...)
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  6. John Kilcullen, Max Weber: On Bureaucracy.score: 18.0
    First, something about the word. 'Bureau' (French, borrowed into German) is a desk, or by extension an office (as in 'I will be at the office tomorrow'; 'I work at the Bureau of Statistics'). 'Bureaucracy' is rule conducted from a desk or office, i.e. by the preparation and dispatch of written documents - or, these days, their electronic equivalent. In the office are kept records of communications sent and received, the files or archives, consulted in preparing new ones. This (...)
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  7. Richard A. Hilbert (1987). Bureaucracy as Belief, Rationalization as Repair: Max Weber in a Post-Functionalist Age. Sociological Theory 5 (1):70-86.score: 18.0
    Weber's discussion of bureaucracy is generally taken as descriptive of organized social structure within a rational-legal society. This is understandable; yet elsewhere in Weber's sociology he cautions against precisely this kind of analysis. His counsel against reification, his emphasis upon subjective ideas standing behind social action, his characterization of "society" as subjective orientation to legitimacy, his discussion of organization and social relationships as probabilities of behavior in accordance with subjective belief in their existence, and his tendency to describe the (...)
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  8. John Skorupski (2008). Equality and Bureaucracy. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 82 (1):161-178.score: 18.0
    Elizabeth Anderson argues for civic as against distributive egalitarianism. I agree with civic egalitarianism understood as a public ideal, and welcome her interest in the sociological conditions under which it may best flourish. But I argue that she is mistaken in opposing what she calls 'hierarchies of esteem' and proposing that where the egalitarian ideal has insufficient hold on civil society it should be implemented by an efficient bureaucracy. We should learn a different lesson from Max Weber. What the (...)
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  9. Edward C. Page & Bill Jenkins (2005). Policy Bureaucracy: Government with a Cast of Thousands. OUP Oxford.score: 18.0
    Policy making is not only about the cut and thrust of politics. It is also a bureaucratic activity. Long before laws are drafted, policy commitments made, or groups consulted on government proposals, officials will have been working away to shape the policy into a form in which it can be presented to ministers and the outside world. Policy bureaucracies - parts of government organizations with specific responsibility for maintaining and developing policy - have to be mobilized before most significant policy (...)
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  10. John Greenaway (1992). British Conservatism and Bureaucracy. History of Political Thought 13 (1):129-160.score: 18.0
    A distinction between �consensual� and �critical� Conservatism would seem to provide a useful framework for analysing the intellectual approaches of conservative thinkers to the question of bureaucracy in Britain in the modern period. It is suggested here that, although in the nineteenth century there quickly emerged a dominant, liberal/conservative consensual approach to bureaucracy, there has also been a lively, countervailing and critical set of conservative ideas and concerns. This critical approach itself contains many strands; it has contributed to (...)
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  11. Jeffrey Friedman (2000). After Democracy, Bureaucracy? Rejoinder to Ciepley. Critical Review 14 (1):113-137.score: 18.0
    Abstract In a certain sense, voluntary communities and market relationships are relatively less coercive than democracy and bureaucracy: they offer more positive freedom. In that respect, they are more like romantic relationships or friendships than are democracies and bureaucracies. This tends to make voluntary communities and markets not only more pleasant forms of interaction, but more effective ones?contrary to Weber's confidence in the superior rationality of bureaucratic control.
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  12. Victoria F. MacDonald (1985). Bureaucracy and Culture: A Conference Report. Telos 1985 (64):105-116.score: 18.0
    The “Fourth International Conference on the Comparative, Historical and Critical Analysis of Bureaucracy” was held in Vancouver, B.C., September 2-6,1985. Focusing on the relations between “Bureaucracy and Culture,” the conference program promised to have sections on intellectuals, the labor movement, prisons, mass culture, the new class, state terrorism, etc. As is usually the case in even the best organized conferences, however, most speakers paid only lip service to their assigned theme and chose to discuss instead whatever they happened (...)
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  13. Laurent Dobuzinskis (1990). Science, Technology and Bureaucracy: From the Discourse of Power to the Power of Discourse. World Futures 28 (1):183-201.score: 18.0
    (1990). Science, technology and bureaucracy: From the discourse of power to the power of discourse. World Futures: Vol. 28, Cross-Cultural Dialogue, pp. 183-201.
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  14. S. Koll (2009). Is Bureaucracy Compatible with Democracy? South African Journal of Philosophy 28 (2).score: 18.0
    In his book, Democratic Autonomy: Public Reasoning about the Ends of Policy, Henry Richardson suggests a process-based objection to bureaucracy – that is, an objection to bureaucracy that does not refer primarily to results, but rather to an ethical flaw that is inherent to bureaucratic procedures. Richardson’s worry is that, while large and complex societies rely on bureaucratic agencies to implement policies, there is a threat of those within bureaucratic institutions having more power than the average citizen when (...)
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  15. Matthew Tieu (2010). Romancing Opiates: Pharmacological Lies and the Addiction Bureaucracy [Book Review]. Bioethics Research Notes 22 (3):43.score: 18.0
    Tieu, Matthew Review of: Romancing Opiates: Pharmacological Lies and the Addiction Bureaucracy, by Theodore Dalrymple, Encounter Books, 2006.
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  16. Amy Rossiter, Richard Walsh-Bowers & Isaac Prilleltensky (1996). Learning From Broken Rules: Individualism, Bureaucracy, and Ethics. Ethics and Behavior 6 (4):307 – 320.score: 16.0
    The authors discuss findings from a qualitative research project concerning applied ethics that was undertaken at a general family counseling agency in southern Ontario. Interview data suggested that workers need to dialogue about ethical dilemmas, but that such dialogue demands a high level of risk taking that feels unsafe in the organization. This finding led the researchers to examine their own sense of "breaking rules" by suggesting an intersubjective view of ethics that requires a "safe space" for ethical dialogue. The (...)
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  17. Daniel Gaido (2008). Archive Marxism and the Union Bureaucracy: Karl Kautsky on Samuel Gompers and the German Free Trade Unions. Historical Materialism 16 (3):115-136.score: 15.0
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  18. Francis E. Rourke (1960). Bureaucracy in Conflict: Administrators and Professionals. Ethics 70 (3):220-227.score: 15.0
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  19. Robert Paehlke (1988). Democracy, Bureaucracy, and Environmentalism. Environmental Ethics 10 (4):291-308.score: 15.0
    Several prominent analysts, including Heilbroner, Ophuls, and Passmore, have drawn bleak conclusions regarding the implications of contemporary environmental realities for the future of democracy. I establish, however, that the day-to-day practice of environmental politics has often had an opposite effect: democratic processes have been enhanced. I conclude that the resolution of environmental problems may weIl be more promising within a political context which is more rather than less democratic.
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  20. Thomas Christiano (2005). Democracy and Bureaucracy. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 71 (1):211–211.score: 15.0
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  21. Matthew Elton (1998). Bureaucracy and Heartlessness: Reply to Dahlbom. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 8 (3):419-421.score: 15.0
  22. Clifford I. Nass (1986). Bureaucracy, Technical Expertise, and Professionals: A Weberian Approach. Sociological Theory 4 (1):61-70.score: 15.0
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  23. Clarence N. Stone (1983). Whither the Welfare State? Professionalization, Bureaucracy, and the Market Alternative:Street-Level Bureaucracy: Dilemmas of the Individual in Public Services. Michael Lipsky; People-Processing: The Street-Level Bureaucrat in Public Service Bureaucracies. Jeffrey Manditch Prottas; The Welfare Industry: Functionaries and Reprients in Public Aid. David Street, Georte T. Martin, Jr., Laura Kramer; Social Welfare: Why and How? Noel Timms. [REVIEW] Ethics 93 (3):588-.score: 15.0
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  24. David Kettler (2007). Women and the State: Käthe Truhel and the Idea of a Social Bureaucracy. History of the Human Sciences 20 (1):19-44.score: 15.0
    Käthe Truhel’s 1934 doctoral dissertation, prepared under the supervision of Karl Mannheim, repays detailed examination for a number of reasons. First, it serves as an important counter-example to commonplace generalities about the alleged incapacity of women social workers of Truhel’s generation, supposedly enmeshed in ideological myths about ‘motherliness’, to reflect on their power relations to a male-dominated society and state. Second, it offers an intrinsically interesting and subtle analysis of the emerging bargaining structure for negotiations between bureaucrats and social workers (...)
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  25. Peter Beilharz (1989). Review Articles : Cornelius Castoriadis, Political and Social Writ Ings. Volume One: 1946-1955. From the Critique of Bu Reaucracy to the Positive Content of Socialism. Volume Two: 1955-1960. From the Workers Struggle Against Bureaucracy to Revolution in the Age of Modern Capitalism, Trans. And Ed. By David Ames Curtis (University of Minnesota Press, 1988). [REVIEW] Thesis Eleven 24 (1):132-141.score: 15.0
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  26. Thomas Christiano (2005). Review: Democracy and Bureaucracy. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 71 (1):211 - 217.score: 15.0
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  27. Tim Hallett & Marc J. Ventresca (2006). Inhabited Institutions: Social Interactions and Organizational Forms in Gouldner's Patterns of Industrial Bureaucracy. Theory and Society 35 (2):213-236.score: 15.0
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  28. Neil R. Luebke (1985). Presidential Address: For and Against Bureaucracy. Philosophical Topics 13 (2):143-154.score: 15.0
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  29. Frederic L. Bender (1989). Bureaucracy. Social Philosophy Today 2:259-272.score: 15.0
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  30. Avner Ben-Amos & Eyal Ben-Ari (1995). Resonance and Reverberation: Ritual and Bureaucracy in the State Funerals of the French Third Republic. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 24 (2):163-191.score: 15.0
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  31. Carl Elliott (2005). The Soul of a New Machine: Bioethicists in the Bureaucracy. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14 (4):379-384.score: 15.0
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  32. David Goldblatt (2008). The Bureaucracy of Beauty: Design in the Age of Its Global Reproducibilityby Dutta, Arindam. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (3):307-309.score: 15.0
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  33. André Liebich (1982). On the Origins of a Marxist Theory of Bureaucracy in the Critique of Hegel's "Philosophy of Right". Political Theory 10 (1):77-93.score: 15.0
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  34. William P. Anderson (2004). Mises Versus Weber on Bureaucracy and Sociological Method. Journal of Libertarian Studies 18:1-30.score: 15.0
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  35. Theodore Dalrymple (1992). Bureaucracy in Nursing. The Chesterton Review 18 (2):288-289.score: 15.0
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  36. John Fantuzzo (2014). A Course Between Bureaucracy and Charisma: A Pedagogical Reading of Max Weber's Social Theory. Journal of Philosophy of Education 48 (4):n/a-n/a.score: 15.0
    Philosophers of education tend to mention Max Weber's social theory in passing, assuming its importance and presuming its comprehension, but few have paused to consider how Weber's social theory might consciously inform educational theory and research, and none have done so comprehensively. The aim of this article is to begin this inquiry through a pedagogical reading of Weber's social theory. The basis of my inquiry is Weber's claim in ‘Science as a Vocation’ that the moral purpose of scholarship is met (...)
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  37. Michael S. Gibson, J. Michael, John Gyford, P. M. Jackson, Tyne South Yorks & West Wear (1981). Bureaucracy and Innovation: An Ethnography of Policy Change. Social Research 115:167.score: 15.0
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  38. D. C. Hodges (1970). The Relevance of Capital to Studies of Bureaucracy. Telos 1970 (6):234-243.score: 15.0
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  39. E. D. Hunt (1980). Aspects of Late Imperial Bureaucracy Andrea Giardina: Aspetti Della Burocrazia Nel Basso Impero. Pp. 170. Rome: Edizioni dell'Ateneo & Bizzarri, 1977. Paper, L. 6,000. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 30 (01):102-104.score: 15.0
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  40. J. Chadwick (1959). A Prehistoric Bureaucracy. Diogenes 7 (26):7-18.score: 15.0
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  41. Lauren J. Silver (2010). Spaces of Encounter: Public Bureaucracy and the Making of Client Identities. Ethos 38 (3):275-296.score: 15.0
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  42. Clarence N. Stone (1983). Review: Whither the Welfare State? Professionalization, Bureaucracy, and the Market Alternative. [REVIEW] Ethics 93 (3):588 - 595.score: 15.0
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  43. Ryan D. Tweney (1991). On Bureaucracy and Science a Response to Fuller. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 21 (2):203-213.score: 15.0
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  44. Meriam N. Alrashid (2008). Comprehensive Immigration Reform: Only as Good as the Bureaucracy It Is Built Upon, The. Nexus 13:29.score: 15.0
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  45. R. Antonio (1983). Bureaucratic Approaches to the Bureaucracy: A Conference Report. Telos 1983 (57):177-185.score: 15.0
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  46. Peter Fibiger Bang (2011). The Imperial Bureaucracy (P.) Eich Zur Metamorphose des politischen Systems in der römischen Kaiserzeit. Die Entstehung einer 'personalen Bürokratie' im langen dritten Jahrhundert. (Klio 9.) Pp. 467. Berlin: Akademie Verlag, 2005. Cased, €69.80. ISBN: 978-3-05-004110-0. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 61 (1):248-249.score: 15.0
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  47. J. Baptista (1974). Bureaucracy, Political System and Social Dynamic. Telos 1974 (22):66-84.score: 15.0
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  48. Michael D. Bayles & Benjamin Freedman (1984). Canada: The Mandarin Bureaucracy. Hastings Center Report 14 (6):17-18.score: 15.0
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  49. P. Beilharz (1979). Bureaucracy -- The Career of a Concept. Telos 1979 (42):215-219.score: 15.0
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  50. Kenneth Buckman (1986). Interest Groups and the Bureaucracy. The Personalist Forum 2 (1):61-65.score: 15.0
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