Search results for 'capabilities' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Alexander Bertland (2009). Virtue Ethics in Business and the Capabilities Approach. Journal of Business Ethics 84 (1):25 - 32.score: 24.0
    Recently, Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum have developed the capabilities approach to provide a model for understanding the effectiveness of programs to help the developing nations. The approach holds that human beings are fundamentally free and have a sense of human dignity. Therefore, institutions need to help people enhance this dignity by providing them with the opportunity to develop their capabilities freely. I argue that this approach may help support business ethics based on virtue. Since teleology has become (...)
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  2. Elizabeth Cripps (2010). Saving the Polar Bear, Saving the World: Can the Capabilities Approach Do Justice to Humans, Animals and Ecosystems? [REVIEW] Res Publica 16 (1):1-22.score: 24.0
    Martha Nussbaum has expanded the capabilities approach to defend positive duties of justice to individuals who fall below Rawls’ standard for fully cooperating members of society, including sentient nonhuman animals. Building on this, David Schlosberg has defended the extension of capabilities justice not only to individual animals but also to entire species and ecosystems. This is an attractive vision: a happy marriage of social, environmental and ecological justice, which also respects the claims of individual animals. This paper asks (...)
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  3. Ramona Ilea (2008). Nussbaum's Capabilities Approach and Nonhuman Animals: Theory and Public Policy. Journal of Social Philosophy 39 (4):547-563.score: 24.0
    In this paper, I assess Martha Nussbaum's application of the capabilities approach to non-human animals for both its philosophical merits and its potential to affect public policy. I argue that there are currently three main philosophical problems with the theory that need further attention. After discussing these problems, I show how focusing on factory farming would enable Nussbaum to demonstrate the philosophical merits of the capabilities approach as well as to suggest more powerful and effectives changes in our (...)
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  4. Mark Coeckelbergh (2011). Human Development or Human Enhancement? A Methodological Reflection on Capabilities and the Evaluation of Information Technologies. Ethics and Information Technology 13 (2):81-92.score: 24.0
    Nussbaum’s version of the capability approach is not only a helpful approach to development problems but can also be employed as a general ethical-anthropological framework in ‘advanced’ societies. This paper explores its normative force for evaluating information technologies, with a particular focus on the issue of human enhancement. It suggests that the capability approach can be a useful way of to specify a workable and adequate level of analysis in human enhancement discussions, but argues that any interpretation of what these (...)
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  5. Efrat Ram-Tiktin (2012). The Right to Health Care as a Right to Basic Human Functional Capabilities. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (3):337 - 351.score: 24.0
    A just social arrangement must guarantee a right to health care for all. This right should be understood as a positive right to basic human functional capabilities. The present article aims to delineate the right to health care as part of an account of distributive justice in health care in terms of the sufficiency of basic human functional capabilities. According to the proposed account, every individual currently living beneath the sufficiency threshold or in jeopardy of falling beneath the (...)
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  6. J. Paul Kelleher (forthcoming). Capabilities Versus Resources. Journal of Moral Philosophy.score: 24.0
    What is the correct metric of distributive justice? Proponents of the capability approach claim that distributive metrics should be articulated in terms of individuals’ effective abilities to achieve important and worthwhile goals. Defenders of resourcism, by contrast, maintain that metrics should instead focus on the distribution of external resources. This debate is now more than three decades old, and it has produced a vast and still growing literature. The present paper aims to provide a fresh perspective on this protracted debate. (...)
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  7. Tony Fitzpatrick (2008). From Contracts to Capabilities and Back Again. Res Publica 14 (2):83-100.score: 24.0
    It has been common for researchers and commentators within the discipline of Social and Public Policy to evoke Rawlsian theories of justice. Yet some now argue that the contractualist tradition cannot adequately incorporate, or account for, relations of care, respect and interdependency. Though contractualism has its flaws this article proposes that we should not reject it. Through a critique of one of its most esteemed critics, Martha Nussbaum, it proposes that contractualism can be defended against the capabilities approach she (...)
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  8. Christopher P. Vogt (2005). Maximizing Human Potential: Capabilities Theory and the Professional Work Environment. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 58 (1-3):111 - 123.score: 24.0
    . Human capabilities theory has emerged as an important framework for measuring whether various social systems promote human flourishing. The premise of this theory is that human beings share some nearly universal capabilities; what makes a human life fulfilling is the opportunity to exercise these capabilities. This essay proposes that the use of human capabilities theory can be expanded to assess whether a company has organized the work environment in such a way that allows workers to (...)
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  9. Colleen Murphy & Paolo Gardoni (2007). Determining Public Policy and Resource Allocation Priorities for Mitigating Natural Hazards: A Capabilities-Based Approach. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (4):489-504.score: 24.0
    This paper proposes a Capabilities-based Approach to guide hazard mitigation efforts. First, a discussion is provided of the criteria that should be met by an adequate framework for formulating public policy and allocating resources. This paper shows why a common decision-aiding tool, Cost-benefit Analysis, fails to fulfill such criteria. A Capabilities-based Approach to hazard mitigation is then presented, drawing on the framework originally developed in the context of development economics and policy. The focus of a Capabilities-based Approach (...)
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  10. Colleen Murphy & Paolo Gardoni (2008). The Acceptability and the Tolerability of Societal Risks: A Capabilities-Based Approach. Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (1):77-92.score: 24.0
    In this paper, we present a Capabilities-based Approach to the acceptability and the tolerability of risks posed by natural and man-made hazards. We argue that judgments about the acceptability and/or tolerability of such risks should be based on an evaluation of the likely societal impact of potential hazards, defined in terms of the expected changes in the capabilities of individuals. Capabilities refer to the functionings, or valuable doings and beings, individuals are able to achieve given available personal, (...)
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  11. Sridhar Venkatapuram (2013). Health, Vital Goals, and Central Human Capabilities. Bioethics 27 (5):271-279.score: 24.0
    I argue for a conception of health as a person's ability to achieve or exercise a cluster of basic human activities. These basic activities are in turn specified through free-standing ethical reasoning about what constitutes a minimal conception of a human life with equal human dignity in the modern world. I arrive at this conception of health by closely following and modifying Lennart Nordenfelt's theory of health which presents health as the ability to achieve vital goals. Despite its strengths I (...)
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  12. Cecile Renouard (2011). Corporate Social Responsibility, Utilitarianism, and the Capabilities Approach. Journal of Business Ethics 98 (1):85 - 97.score: 24.0
    This article explores the possible convergence between the capabilities approach and utilitarianism to specify CSR. It defends the idea that this key issue is related to the anthropological perspective that underpins both theories and demonstrates that a relational conception of individual freedoms and rights present in both traditions gives adequate criteria for CSR toward the company's stakeholders. I therefore defend "relational capability" as a means of providing a common paradigm, a shared vision of a core component of human development. (...)
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  13. Mark Coeckelbergh (2010). Health Care, Capabilities, and Ai Assistive Technologies. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (2):181 - 190.score: 24.0
    Scenarios involving the introduction of artificially intelligent (AI) assistive technologies in health care practices raise several ethical issues. In this paper, I discuss four objections to introducing AI assistive technologies in health care practices as replacements of human care. I analyse them as demands for felt care, good care, private care, and real care. I argue that although these objections cannot stand as good reasons for a general and a priori rejection of AI assistive technologies as such or as replacements (...)
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  14. Pete Tashman & Valentina Marano (2009). Dynamic Capabilities and Base of the Pyramid Business Strategies. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):495 - 514.score: 24.0
    Numerous scholars have observed that the relationship between poverty and violent conflict is endogenous. As a result, the area of Peace Through Commerce argues as one of its central tenets that the institution of business may be able to contribute to sustainable peace by creating economic development where poverty is a critical issue. While this argument may be valid, it leaves the question open — what is the business case for engaging in poverty alleviation business strategies? Strategic Management scholars are (...)
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  15. Linda Barclay (2012). Natural Deficiency or Social Oppression? The Capabilities Approach to Justice for People with Disabilities. Journal of Moral Philosophy 9 (4):500-520.score: 24.0
    Theories of distributive justice are often criticised for either excluding people with disabilities from the domain of justice altogether, or casting them as deficient in personal attributes. I argue that the capabilities approach to justice is largely immune to these flaws. It has the conceptual resources to locate most of the causes of disadvantage in the interaction between a person and her environment and in doing so can characterise the disadvantages of disability in a way that avoids the imputation (...)
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  16. Melanie Walker (2003). Framing Social Justice in Education: What Does the 'Capabilities' Approach Offer? British Journal of Educational Studies 51 (2):168 - 187.score: 24.0
    This paper develops a framework for conceptualising social justice in education, drawing particularly on Martha Nussbaum's (2000) capabilities approach. The practical case for consideration is that of widening participation and pedagogical implications in higher (university) education in England. While the paper supports the value and usefulness of Nussbaum's list of ten capabilities for developing a more radical and challenging language and practice for higher education pedagogies, it also argues that her approach is limited. Other ways of conceptualising social (...)
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  17. Yu-Shan Chen & Ching-Hsun Chang (2013). The Determinants of Green Product Development Performance: Green Dynamic Capabilities, Green Transformational Leadership, and Green Creativity. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 116 (1):107-119.score: 24.0
    Because no previous literature discusses the determinants of green product development performance, this study develops an original framework to fill the research gap. This study explores the influences of green dynamic capabilities and green transformational leadership on green product development performance and investigates the mediation role of green creativity. The results demonstrate that green dynamic capabilities and green transformational leadership positively influence green creativity and green product development performance. Besides, this study indicates that the positive relationships between green (...)
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  18. Paul Formosa & Catriona Mackenzie (forthcoming). Nussbaum, Kant, and the Capabilities Approach to Dignity. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-18.score: 24.0
    The concept of dignity plays a foundational role in the more recent versions of Martha Nussbaum’s capabilities theory. However, despite its centrality to her theory, Nussbaum’s conception of dignity remains under-theorised. In this paper we critically examine the role that dignity plays in Nussbaum’s theory by, first, developing an account of the concept of dignity and introducing a distinction between two types of dignity, status dignity and achievement dignity. Next, drawing on this account, we analyse Nussbaum’s conception of dignity (...)
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  19. Wouter Peeters, Jo Dirix & Sigrid Sterckx (forthcoming). Towards an Integration of the Ecological Space Paradigm and the Capabilities Approach. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics:1-18.score: 24.0
    In order to develop a model of equitable and sustainable distribution, this paper advocates integrating the ecological space paradigm and the capabilities approach. As the currency of distribution, this account proposes a hybrid of capabilities and ecological space. Although the goal of distributive justice should be to secure and promote people’s capabilities now and in the future, doing so requires acknowledging that these capabilities are dependent on the biophysical preconditions as well as inculcating the ethos of (...)
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  20. John P. Clark (2009). Capabilities Theory and the Limits of Liberal Justice: On Nussbaum's Frontiers of Justice. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 10 (4):583-604.score: 24.0
    In Frontiers of Justice, Martha Nussbaum applies the “Capabilities Approach,” which she calls “one species of a human rights approach,” to justice issues that have in her view been inadequately addressed in liberal political theory. These issues include rights of the disabled, rights that transcend national borders, and animal rights issues. She demonstrates the weakness of Rawlsianism, contractualism in general, and much of the Kantian tradition in moral philosophy and shows the need to move beyond the limitations of narrow (...)
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  21. Pier Jaarsma & Stellan Welin (2013). Human Capabilities, Mild Autism, Deafness and the Morality of Embryo Selection. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):817-824.score: 24.0
    A preimplantation genetic test to discriminate between severe and mild autism spectrum disorder might be developed in the foreseeable future. Recently, the philosophers Julian Savulescu and Guy Kahane claimed that there are strong reasons for prospective parents to make use of such a test to prevent the birth of children who are disposed to autism or Asperger’s disorder. In this paper we will criticize this claim. We will discuss the morality of selection for mild autism in embryo selection in a (...)
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  22. Nuttaneeya Ann Torugsa, Wayne O'Donohue & Rob Hecker (2012). Capabilities, Proactive CSR and Financial Performance in SMEs: Empirical Evidence From an Australian Manufacturing Industry Sector. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 109 (4):483-500.score: 24.0
    Proactive corporate social responsibility (CSR) involves business strategies and practices adopted voluntarily by firms that go beyond regulatory requirements in order to manage their social responsibilities, and thereby contribute broadly and positively to society. Proactive CSR has been less researched in small and medium enterprises (SMEs) compared to large firms; and, whether SMEs are ideally placed to gain competitive advantage through such activity therefore remains a point of debate. This study examines empirically the association between three specified capabilities (shared (...)
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  23. Nuttaneeya Ann Torugsa, Wayne O'Donohue & Rob Hecker (2013). Proactive CSR: An Empirical Analysis of the Role of its Economic, Social and Environmental Dimensions on the Association Between Capabilities and Performance. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 115 (2):383-402.score: 24.0
    Proactive corporate social responsibility (CSR) involves business practices adopted voluntarily by firms that go beyond regulatory requirements in order to actively support sustainable economic, social and environmental development, and thereby contribute broadly and positively to society. This empirical study examines the role of the economic, social and environmental dimensions of proactive CSR on the association between three specific capabilities—shared vision, stakeholder management and strategic proactivity—and financial performance in small and medium enterprises (SMEs). Using quantitative data collected from a sample (...)
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  24. Richard J. Arend (2013). Social and Environmental Performance at SMEs: Considering Motivations, Capabilities, and Instrumentalism. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics:1-21.score: 24.0
    Our analysis of recent survey data of US small- and medium-sized enterprises explores the question of how these entrepreneurial ventures can do well by doing good—i.e., how they can build a competitive advantage with their social and environmental practices. We focus on several firm characteristics and choices involving motivations and capabilities. We use hierarchical OLS to analyze the survey data to find that an orientation to, commitments to, and dynamic flexibility in, the firm’s CSR and green policies are significant (...)
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  25. Subrata Chakrabarty & Liang Wang (2012). The Long-Term Sustenance of Sustainability Practices in MNCs: A Dynamic Capabilities Perspective of the Role of R&D and Internationalization. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 110 (2):205-217.score: 24.0
    What allows MNCs to maintain their sustainability practices over the long-term? This is an important but under-examined question. To address this question, we investigate both the development and sustenance of sustainability practices. We use the dynamic capabilities perspective, rooted in resource-based view literature, as the theoretical basis. We argue that MNCs that simultaneously pursue both higher R&D intensity and higher internationalization are more capable of developing and maintaining sustainability practices. We test our hypotheses using longitudinal panel data from 1989 (...)
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  26. Lieske Voget-Kleschin (forthcoming). Reasoning Claims for More Sustainable Food Consumption: A Capabilities Perspective. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics:1-23.score: 24.0
    This paper examines how employing the capabilities approach in conceptualizing sustainable development allows reasoning and specifying claims for more sustainable lifestyles. In doing so, it focuses on the example of food consumption because it constitutes an ‘(un)sustainability hotspot’ as well as a paradigmatic example for the tensions between individual lifestyles on the one hand and societal consequences of such lifestyles on the other. The arguments developed in the paper allow rebutting two common objections against claims for individual changes in (...)
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  27. Ville Päivänsalo (2010). Responsibilities for Human Capabilities: Avoiding a Comprehensive Global Program. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 11 (4):565-579.score: 24.0
    Violence, poverty, and illness are all too prevalent in our world. In order to alleviate their hold systematically, we need normative schemes with a global reach and with definite responsibilities. Martha Nussbaum’s human capabilities theory (Martha Nussbaum 2006) provides us with an insightful example. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (The United Nations 1948), however, already includes most of the human capabilities central to Nussbaum’s theory, and violence, poverty, and illness usually appear as objectionable enough without any additional (...)
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  28. Lauge Baungaard Rasmussen (2003). The Facilitation of Groups and Networks: Capabilities to Shape Creative Cooperation. [REVIEW] AI and Society 17 (3-4):307-321.score: 24.0
    Various economic, social and technological developmental trends have induced new challenges to intra- and inter-organisational cooperation. The facilitator, defined as a process guide of creative cooperation, is becoming more and more in focus to assist groups, teams and networks to meet these challenges. The author defines and exemplifies different levels of creative cooperation. Core capabilities of facilitation are defined and explained at each level. Finally, possible societal and ethical aspects of facilitation are discussed as well as future perspectives of (...)
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  29. Donna Vaughan (2011). The Importance of Capabilities in the Sustainability of Information and Communications Technology Programs: The Case of Remote Indigenous Australian Communities. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 13 (2):131-150.score: 24.0
    The use of the capability approach as an evaluative tool for Information and Communication Technology (ICT) policy and programs in developing countries, in particular at a grass-roots community level, is an emerging field of application. However, one of the difficulties with ICT for development (ICT4D) evaluations is in linking what is often no more than a resource, for example basic access, to actual outcomes, or means to end. This article argues that the capability approach provides a framework for evaluating the (...)
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  30. Yingqin Zheng & Bernd Carsten Stahl (2011). Technology, Capabilities and Critical Perspectives: What Can Critical Theory Contribute to Sen's Capability Approach? [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 13 (2):69-80.score: 22.0
    This paper explores what insights can be drawn from critical theory to enrich and strengthen Sen’s capability approach in relation to technology and human development. The two theories share some important commonalities: both are concerned with the pursuit of “a good life”; both are normative theories rooted in ethics and meant to make a difference, and both are interested in democracy. The paper provides a brief overview of both schools of thought and their applications to technology and human development. Three (...)
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  31. Gunter Graf & Gottfried Schweiger (2013). Capabilities, Recognition and the Philosophical Evaluation of Poverty: A Discussion of Issues of Justification and the Role of Subjective Experiences. International Critical Thought 3 (3):282--296.score: 22.0
    Both the capability and the recognition approach are influential and substantial theories in social philosophy. In this contribution, we outline their main assumptions in their assessment of poverty. The two approaches are set in relation to each other, focusing mainly on (a) their moral evaluation of poverty, (b) issues of justification of their central normative claims, and (c) the role that is attributed to subjective experiences, feelings and emotions in these theories. This comparison reveals that in spite of significant differences, (...)
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  32. Agni Kalfagianni (2013). Addressing the Global Sustainability Challenge: The Potential and Pitfalls of Private Governance From the Perspective of Human Capabilities. Journal of Business Ethics:1-14.score: 22.0
    Contemporary global politics is characterized by an increasing trend toward experimental forms of governance, with an emphasis on private governance. A plurality of private standards, codes of conduct and quality assurance schemes currently developed particularly, though not exclusively, by TNCs replace traditional intergovernmental regimes in addressing profound global environmental and socio-economic challenges ranging from forest deforestation, fisheries depletion, climate change, to labor and human rights concerns. While this trend has produced a heated debate in science and politics, surprisingly little attention (...)
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  33. Martha Nussbaum (2009). The Capabilities of People with Cognitive Disabilities. Metaphilosophy 40 (3-4):331-351.score: 21.0
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  34. Ingrid Robeyns (2005). Assessing Global Poverty and Inequality: Income, Resources, and Capabilities. Metaphilosophy 36 (1‐2):30-49.score: 21.0
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  35. Thom Brooks (2012). Preserving Capabilities. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (6):48-49.score: 21.0
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 6, Page 48-49, June 2012.
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  36. Katharine Gelber (2010). Freedom of Political Speech, Hate Speech and the Argument From Democracy: The Transformative Contribution of Capabilities Theory. Contemporary Political Theory 9 (3):304-324.score: 21.0
  37. Cynthia A. Stark (2009). Respecting Human Dignity: Contract Versus Capabilities. Metaphilosophy 40 (3-4):366-381.score: 21.0
  38. Shirley Pendlebury (2008). Accuracy, Sincerity and Capabilities in the Practice of Teaching. Studies in Philosophy and Education 27 (2-3):173-183.score: 21.0
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  39. Marit Honerød Hoveid & Halvor Hoveid (2009). Educational Practice and Development of Human Capabilities. Studies in Philosophy and Education 28 (5):461-472.score: 21.0
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  40. Robert F. Garnett (2009). Liberal Learning as Freedom: A Capabilities Approach to Undergraduate Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 28 (5):437-447.score: 21.0
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  41. H. E. Baber (2010). Worlds, Capabilities and Well-Being. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (4):377 - 392.score: 20.0
    Critics suggest that without some "objective" account of well-being we cannot explain why satisfying some preferences is, as we believe, better than satisfying others, why satisfying some preferences may leave us on net worse off or why, in a range of cases, we should reject life-adjustment in favor of life-improvement. I defend a subjective welfarist understanding of well-being against such objections by reconstructing the Amartya Sen's capability approach as a preferentist account of well-being. According to the proposed account preference satisfaction (...)
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  42. William Wresch (2009). Progress on the Global Digital Divide: An Ethical Perspective Based on Amartya Sen's Capabilities Model. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 11 (4):255-263.score: 20.0
    This paper examines evolving technological capabilities in developing countries. Counts of web sites indicate that some progress is being made in some of the world’s poorest countries, but the numbers show even with this progress, the gap between developed and developing countries is actually growing. So has there been progress in closing the global digital divide? The significance of web sites to provide access to necessary medical information, local cultural information, and the general visibility of the developing world is (...)
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  43. Benedetta Giovanola (2009). Re-Thinking the Anthropological and Ethical Foundation of Economics and Business: Human Richness and Capabilities Enhancement. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (3):431 - 444.score: 20.0
    This article aims at showing the need for a sound ethical and anthropological foundation of economics and business, and argues the importance of a correct understanding of human values and human nature for the sake of economics and of businesses themselves. It is suggested that the ethical-anthropological side of economics and business can be grasped by taking Aristotle’s virtue ethics and Amartya Sen’s capability approach (CA) as major reference points. We hold that an “Aristotelian economics of virtues”, connected with the (...)
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  44. William F. Birdsall (2011). Human Capabilities and Information and Communication Technology: The Communicative Connection. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 13 (2):93-106.score: 20.0
    The potential contributions information and communication technology (ICT) can make to advancing human capabilities are acknowledged by both the capability approach (CA) and ICT communities. However, there is a lack of genuine engagement between the two communities. This paper addresses the question: How can a collaborative dialogue between the CA and ICT communities be advanced? A prerequisite to exploring collaboratively the potential use of particular technologies with specific capabilities is a conceptual framework within which a dialogue can be (...)
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  45. Respecting Human Dignity, Contract Versus Capabilities & Cynthia A. Stark (2010). The Ideal of Justification I Have Described is in Tension with Another Ideal, Which Says That All Members of Society Are Owed Justice Regardless Of. In Eva Feder Kittay & Licia Carlson (eds.), Cognitive Disability and its Challenge to Moral Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 20.0
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  46. Human Capabilities & Female Human Beings (2006). Martha C. Nussbaum. In Elizabeth Hackett & Sally Anne Haslanger (eds.), Theorizing Feminisms: A Reader. Oxford University Press.score: 20.0
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  47. Luigino Bruni, Flavio Comim & Maurizio Pugno (eds.) (2008). Capabilities and Happiness. OUP Oxford.score: 19.0
    Few would dispute that the well-being of individuals is one of the most desirable aims of human actions. However, approaches on how to define, measure, evaluate, and promote well-being differ widely. The conventional economic approach takes income (or the power to acquire market goods) as the most important indicator for well-being, and the utility function as the formal device for positive and normative analysis. However, this approach to well-being has been questioned for being seriously limited and other approaches have arisen. (...)
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  48. Peter Vallentyne (2005). Capabilities Vs. Opportunities for Well-Being. Journal of Political Philosophy 13:359-371.score: 18.0
    Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum have argued that justice is concerned, at least in part, with the distribution of capabilities (opportunities to function). Richard Arneson, G.A. Cohen, and John Roemer have argued that justice is concerned with something like the distribution of opportunities for well-being. I argue that, although some versions of the capability view are incompatible with some versions of the opportunity for well-being view, the most plausible version of the capability view is identical to a slight generalization (...)
     
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  49. Michael P. Allen (2006). Hegel Between Non-Domination and Expressive Freedom: Capabilities, Perspectives, Democracy. Philosophy and Social Criticism 32 (4):493-512.score: 18.0
    Hegel may be read as endorsing a republican conception of freedom as non-domination. This may then be allied to an expressive conception of freedom not as communal integration and non-alienation, but rather as the development of new powers and capabilities. To this extent, he may be understood as occupying a position between nondomination and expressive freedom. This not only informs contemporary discussions of republicanism and democracy, but also suggests a ‘capabilities solution’ to the otherwise intractable problem of the (...)
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  50. Thom Brooks, The Capabilities Approach, Religious Practices, and the Importance of Recognition.score: 18.0
    When can ever be justified in banning a religious practice? This paper focusses on Martha Nussbaum's capabilities approach. Certain religious practices create a clash between capabilities where the capability to religious belief and expression is in conflict with the capability of equal status and nondiscrimination. One example of such a clash is the case of polygamy. Nussbaum argues that there may be circumstances where polygamy may be acceptable. On the contrary, I argue that the capabilities approach cannot (...)
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