Search results for 'causal asymmetry' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Andrea Bender & Sieghard Beller (2011). Causal Asymmetry Across Cultures: Assigning Causal Roles in Symmetric Physical Settings. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 212.0
    In the cognitive sciences, causal cognition in the physical domain has featured as a core research topic, but the impact of culture has been rarely ever explored. One case in point for a topic on which this neglect is pronounced is the pervasive tendency of people to consider one of two (equally important) entities as more important for bringing about an effect. In order to scrutinize how robust such tendencies are across cultures, we asked German and Tongan participants to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jig-Chuen Lee (1986). Causal Condition, Causal Asymmetry, and the Counterfactual Analysis of Causation. Synthese 67 (2):213 - 223.score: 180.0
    In a recent paper Causal Asymmetry, Douglas Ehring has proposed an intriguing solution to the vexing problem of causal asymmetry. The aim of this paper is to show that his theory is not satisfactory. Moreover, the examples that I use in showing the defect of Ehring's theory also indicate that the counterfactual analysis of causation has a problem that cannot be remedied by Marshall Swain's suggested refinement of the counterfactual analysis of causation in Causation and Distinct (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Paul Noordhof (2003). Epiphenomenalism and Causal Asymmetry. In Hallvard Lillehammer & Gonzalo Rodriguez-Pereyra (eds.), Real Metaphysics: Essays in Honour of D. H. Mellor. New York: Routledge.score: 162.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Huw Price (1992). Agency and Causal Asymmetry. Mind 101 (403):501-520.score: 150.0
  5. Daniel M. Hausman (1982). Causal and Explanatory Asymmetry. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1982:43 - 54.score: 150.0
    This paper asks why causal asymmetries should give rise to explanatory asymmetries. One way to give some rationale for the asymmetries of causal explanation is to adopt a pragmatic view of explanation and to stress the fact that causes can be used to manipulate their effects. This paper argues, however, that when one recognizes that causal asymmetry is fundamentally an asymmetry of "connectedness", one can see how causal asymmetry leads to an objective difference (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. David Papineau (1985). Causal Asymmetry. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 36 (3):273-289.score: 150.0
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Douglas Ehring (1987). Papineau on Causal Asymmetry. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 38 (1):81-87.score: 150.0
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Douglas Ehring (1988). Causal Asymmetry and Causal Relata: Reply to Lee. Synthese 76 (3):371 - 375.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Douglas Ehring (1982). Causal Asymmetry. Journal of Philosophy 79 (12):761-774.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. D. Papineau (1988). Response to Ehring's 'Papineau on Causal Asymmetry'. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 39 (4):521-525.score: 150.0
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Gregory Bassham (1986). Ehring's Theory of Causal Asymmetry. Analysis 46 (1):29 - 32.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Jig-Chuen Lee (1984). On Mackie's Solution To The Problem of Causal Asymmetry. Philosophical Inquiry 6 (2):136-143.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Mathias Frisch (2006). Causal Asymmetry, Counterfactual Decisions and Entropy. In Borchert (ed.), Philosophy of Science. Macmillan. 72--5.score: 150.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. D. Papineau (1988). Papineau on Causal Asymmetry-Response. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 39 (4):521-525.score: 150.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Gerhard Schun (2001). Causal Asymmetry, Independent Versus Dependent Variables, and the Direction of Time1. In Wolfgang Spohn, Marion Ledwig & Michael Esfeld (eds.), Current Issues in Causation. Mentis. 47.score: 150.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Daniel M. Hausman (1993). Linking Causal and Explanatory Asymmetry. Philosophy of Science 60 (3):435-451.score: 144.0
    This essay defends two theses that jointly establish a link between causal and explanatory asymmetry. The first thesis is that statements specifying facts about effects, unlike statements specifying facts about causes, are not "independently variable". The second thesis is that independent variability among purportedly explanatory factors is a necessary condition on scientific explanations.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Mathias Frisch (2010). Causal Models and the Asymmetry of State Preparation. In Mauricio Suarez, Mauro Dorato & Miklos Redei (eds.), Epsa Philosophical Issues in the Sciences. Springer. 75--85.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Douglas Ehring (1986). Closed Causal Loops, Single Causes, and Asymmetry. Analysis 46 (1):33 - 35.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. William Eckhardt (2006). Causal Time Asymmetry. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 37 (3):439-466.score: 120.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Jessica M. Wilson (2014). Hume's Dictum and the Asymmetry of Counterfactual Dependence. In Alastair Wilson (ed.), Chance and Temporal Asymmetry. Oxford University Press. 258-279.score: 108.0
    Why believe Hume's Dictum, according to which there are, roughly speaking, no necessary connections between wholly distinct entities? Schaffer ('Quiddistic Knowledge', 2009) suggests that HD, at least as applied to causal or nomological connections, is motivated as required by the best account of (the truth) of counterfactuals---namely, a similarity-based possible worlds account, where the operative notion of similarity requires 'miracles'---more specifically, worlds where entities of the same type that actually exist enter into different laws. The main cited motivations for (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Daniel M. Hausman (1998). Causal Asymmetries. Cambridge University Press.score: 96.0
    This book, by one of the pre-eminent philosophers of science writing today, offers the most comprehensive account available of causal asymmetries. Causation is asymmetrical in many different ways. Causes precede effects; explanations cite causes not effects. Agents use causes to manipulate their effects; they don't use effects to manipulate their causes. Effects of a common cause are correlated; causes of a common effect are not. This book explains why a relationship that is asymmetrical in one of these regards is (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Douglas Kutach (2013). Causation and Its Basis in Fundamental Physics. Oxford University Press.score: 90.0
    I provide a comprehensive metaphysics of causation based on the idea that fundamentally things are governed by the laws of physics, and that derivatively difference-making can be assessed in terms of what fundamental laws of physics imply for hypothesized events. Highlights include a general philosophical methodology, the fundamental/derivative distinction, and my mature account of causal asymmetry.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Douglas Kutach (2007). The Physical Foundations of Causation. In Huw Price & Richard Corry (eds.), Causation, Physics, and the Constitution of Reality: Russell's Republic Revisited. Oxford University Press.score: 90.0
    I defend what may loosely be called an eliminativist account of causation by showing how several of the main features of causation, namely asymmetry, transitivity, and necessitation (or sometimes probability-raising), arise from the combination of fundamental dynamical laws and a special constraint on the macroscopic structure of matter in the past. At the microscopic level, the causal features of necessitation and transitivity are grounded, but not the asymmetry. At the coarse-grained level of the macroscopic physics, the (...) asymmetry is grounded, but not the necessitation or transitivity. Thus, at no single level of description does the physics justify the conditions that are taken to be constitutive of causation. Nevertheless, if we mix our reasoning about the microscopic and macroscopic descriptions, the structure provided by the dynamics and special initial conditions can justify the folk concept of causation to a significant extent. I explain why our causal concept works so well even though at bottom it is comprised of a patchwork of principles that don't mesh well. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Douglas Kutach (2011). Backtracking Influence. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 25 (1):55-71.score: 90.0
    Backtracking influence is influence that zigzags in time. For example, backtracking influence exists when an event E_1 makes an event E_2 more likely by way of a nomic connection that goes from E_1 back in time to an event C and then forward in time to E_2. I contend that in our local region of spacetime, at least, backtracking influence is redundant in the sense that any existing backtracking influence exerted by E_1 on E_2 is equivalent to E_1's temporally direct (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Phil Dowe (1992). Process Causality and Asymmetry. Erkenntnis 37 (2):179-196.score: 90.0
    Process theories of causality seek to explicate causality as a property of individual causal processes. This paper examines the capacity of such theories to account for the asymmetry of causation. Three types of theories of asymmetry are discussed; the subjective, the temporal, and the physical, the third of these being the preferred approach. Asymmetric features of the world, namely the entropic and Kaon arrows, are considered as possible sources of causal asymmetry and a physical theory (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Brad Weslake (2006). Common Causes and the Direction of Causation. Minds and Machines 16 (3):239-257.score: 84.0
    Is the common cause principle merely one of a set of useful heuristics for discovering causal relations, or is it rather a piece of heavy duty metaphysics, capable of grounding the direction of causation itself? Since the principle was introduced in Reichenbach’s groundbreaking work The Direction of Time (1956), there have been a series of attempts to pursue the latter program—to take the probabilistic relationships constitutive of the principle of the common cause and use them to ground the direction (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Rebecca G. Deason, David R. Andresen & Chad J. Marsolek (2005). Causal Relations Between Asymmetries at the Individual Level? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (4):596-597.score: 84.0
    Studies with humans have failed to produce evidence that any direct causal relation exists between the asymmetry of one function in an individual and the asymmetry of a different function in that individual. Without such evidence, factors external to an individual's nervous system, such as social interactions, may play crucial roles in explaining the directions of all asymmetries at all levels.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Michael Baumgartner (2008). The Causal Chain Problem. Erkenntnis 69 (2):201 - 226.score: 66.0
    This paper addresses a problem that arises when it comes to inferring deterministic causal chains from pertinent empirical data. It will be shown that to every deterministic chain there exists an empirically equivalent common cause structure. Thus, our overall conviction that deterministic chains are one of the most ubiquitous (macroscopic) causal structures is underdetermined by empirical data. It will be argued that even though the chain and its associated common cause model are empirically equivalent there exists an important (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Mathias Frisch (2012). No Place for Causes? Causal Skepticism in Physics. European Journal for Philosophy of Science 2 (3):313-336.score: 66.0
    According to a widespread view, which can be traced back to Russell’s famous attack on the notion of cause, causal notions have no legitimate role to play in how mature physical theories represent the world. In this paper I first critically examine a number of arguments for this view that center on the asymmetry of the causal relation and argue that none of them succeed. I then argue that embedding the dynamical models of a theory into richer (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Jacques L. Rubin (2010). Conformal Proper Times According to the Woodhouse Causal Axiomatics of Relativistic Spacetimes. Foundations of Physics 40 (2):158-178.score: 66.0
    On the basis of the Woodhouse causal axiomatics, we show that conformal proper times and an extra variable in addition to those of space and time, together give a physical justification for the ‘chronometric hypothesis’ of general relativity. Indeed, we show that, with a lack of these latter two ingredients and of this hypothesis, clock paradoxes exist for which the unparadoxical asymmetry cannot be recovered when using the ‘clock and message functions’ only. These proper times originate from a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Raoul Gervais & Erik Weber (2011). The Covering Law Model Applied to Dynamical Cognitive Science: A Comment on Joel Walmsley. Minds and Machines 21 (1):33-39.score: 66.0
    In a 2008 paper, Walmsley argued that the explanations employed in the dynamical approach to cognitive science, as exemplified by the Haken, Kelso and Bunz model of rhythmic finger movement, and the model of infant preservative reaching developed by Esther Thelen and her colleagues, conform to Carl Hempel and Paul Oppenheim’s deductive-nomological model of explanation (also known as the covering law model). Although we think Walmsley’s approach is methodologically sound in that it starts with an analysis of scientific practice rather (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. J. T. Manning & D. Wood (1998). Fluctuating Asymmetry and Aggression in Boys. Human Nature 9 (1):53-65.score: 66.0
    Fluctuating asymmetry (FA) is small deviations from perfect symmetry in normally bilaterally symmetrical traits. We examined the relationship between FA of five body traits (ear height, length of three digits, and ankle circumference) and self-reported scores of physical and verbal aggression in a sample of 90 boys aged 10 to 15 years. The relationships between FA and scores of aggression (particularly physical aggression) were found to be negative; in other words, the most symmetrical boys showed highest aggression. One trait (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Huw Price (1996). Backward Causation and the Direction of Causal Processes: Reply to Dowe. Mind 105 (419):467-474.score: 60.0
    argues that the success of the backward causation hypothesis in quantum mechanics would provide strong support for a version of Reichenbach's account of the direction of causal processes, which takes the direction of causation to rest on the fork asymmetry. He also criticises my perspectival account of the direction of causation, which takes causal asymmetry to be a projection of our own temporal asymmetry as agents. In this reply I take issue with Dowe's argument at (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. David Papineau (1992). Can We Reduce Causal Direction to Probabilities? PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1992:238 - 252.score: 60.0
    This paper defends the view that the asymmetry of causation can be explained in terms of probabilistic relationships between event types. Papineau first explores three different versions of the "fork asymmetry", namely (i) David Lewis' asymmetry of overdetermination, (ii) the screening-off property of common causes, and (iii) Spirtes', Glymour's and Scheines' analysis of probabilistic graphs. He then argues that this fork asymmetry is both (i) a genuine phenomenon and (ii) a satisfactory metaphysical reduction of (...) asymmetry. In his final section he shows how this reduction can account for the relevance of causal direction to human agency, and in particular for the fact that we can manipulate causes to influence their effects, but not vice versa. (shrink)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. H. Price (1996). Discussion. Backward Causation and the Direction of Causal Processes: Reply to Dowe. Mind 105 (419):467-474.score: 60.0
    Dowe (1996) argues that the success of the backward causation hypothesis in quantum mechanics would provide strong support for a version of Reichenbach's account of the direction of causal processes, which takes the direction of causation to rest on the fork asymmetry. He also criticises my perspectival account of the direction of causation, which takes causal asymmetry to be a projection of our own temporal asymmetry as agents. In this reply I take issue with Dowe's (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Huw Price & Brad Weslake (2009). The Time-Asymmetry of Causation. In Helen Beebee, Peter Menzies & Christopher Hitchcock (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Causation. Oxford University Press.score: 54.0
    One of the most striking features of causation is that causes typically precede their effects – the causal arrow is strongly aligned with the temporal arrow. Why should this be so? We offer an opinionated guide to this problem, and to the solutions currently on offer. We conclude that the most promising strategy is to begin with the de facto asymmetry of human deliberation, characterised in epistemic terms, and to build out from there. More than any rival, this (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Huw Price (2007). Causal Perspectivalism. In Huw Price & Richard Corry (eds.), Causation, Physics, and the Constitution of Reality: Russell's Republic Revisited. Oxford University Press.score: 54.0
    Concepts employed in folk descriptions of the world often turn out to be more perspectival than they seem at first sight, involving previously unrecognised sensitivity to the viewpoint or 'situation' of the user of the concept in question. Often, it is progress in science that reveals such perspectivity, and the deciding factor is that we realise that other creatures would apply the same concepts with different extension, in virtue of differences between their circumstances and ours. In this paper I argue (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Max Kistler (2013). The Interventionist Account of Causation and Non-Causal Association Laws. Erkenntnis 78 (1):1-20.score: 54.0
    The key idea of the interventionist account of causation is that a variable A causes a variable B if and only if B would change if A were manipulated in the appropriate way. This paper raises two problems for Woodward's (2003) version of interventionism. The first is that the conditions it imposes are not sufficient for causation, because these conditions are also satisfied by non-causal relations of nomological dependence expressed in association laws. Such laws ground a relation of mutual (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Mathias Frisch (2005). Inconsistency, Asymmetry, and Non-Locality: A Philosophical Investigation of Classical Electrodynamics. Oxford University Press.score: 54.0
    Mathias Frisch provides the first sustained philosophical discussion of conceptual problems in classical particle-field theories. Part of the book focuses on the problem of a satisfactory equation of motion for charged particles interacting with electromagnetic fields. As Frisch shows, the standard equation of motion results in a mathematically inconsistent theory, yet there is no fully consistent and conceptually unproblematic alternative theory. Frisch describes in detail how the search for a fundamental equation of motion is partly driven by pragmatic considerations (like (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Alexander Gebharter (2013). Solving the Flagpole Problem. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 44 (1):63-67.score: 54.0
    In this paper I demonstrate that the causal structure of flagpole-like systems can be determined by application of causal graph theory. Additional information about the ordering of events in time or about how parameters of the systems of interest can be manipulated is not needed.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. M. Carrier (2003). How to Tell Causes From Effects: Kant's Causal Theory of Time and Modern Approaches. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 34 (1):59-71.score: 54.0
    I attempt a reconstruction of Kant's version of the causal theory of time that makes it appear coherent. Two problems are at issue. The first concerns Kant's reference to reciprocal causal influence for characterizing simultaneity. This approach is criticized by pointing out that Kant's procedure involves simultaneous counterdirected processes-which seems to run into circularity. The problem can be defused by drawing on instantaneous processes such as the propagation of gravitation in Newtonian mechanics. Another charge of circularity against Kant's (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. J. A. Cover (1987). Causal Priority and Causal Conditionship. Synthese 71 (1):19 - 36.score: 54.0
    Temporal analyses of causal directionality fail if causes needn't precede their effects. Certain well-known difficulties with alternative (non-temporal) analyses have, in recent accounts, been avoided by attending more carefully to the formal features of relations typically figuring in philosophical discussions of causation. I discuss here a representative of such accounts, offered by David Sanford, according to which a correct analysis of causal priority must issue from viewing the condition relation as nonsymmetrical. The theory is shown first to be (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Jean-François Bonnefon & Steven A. Sloman (2013). The Causal Structure of Utility Conditionals. Cognitive Science 37 (1):193-209.score: 54.0
    The psychology of reasoning is increasingly considering agents' values and preferences, achieving greater integration with judgment and decision making, social cognition, and moral reasoning. Some of this research investigates utility conditionals, ‘‘if p then q’’ statements where the realization of p or q or both is valued by some agents. Various approaches to utility conditionals share the assumption that reasoners make inferences from utility conditionals based on the comparison between the utility of p and the expected utility of q. This (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Georges Dicker (2000). Regularity, Conditionality, and Asymmetry in Causation. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 7:129-138.score: 54.0
    In this paper I explore the relationship between the “Humean” regularity view of causation, the view that a cause is a necessary condition of its effect, and the asymmetry of causation—the principle that if an event e1 causes e2, then it is false that e2 causes e1. I argue that the regularity view, in combination with the view that a cause is a necessary condition of its effect, is inconsistent with the asymmetry of causation, and that the inconsistency (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. C. Hitchock (2000). Review. Causal Asymmetries. DM Hausman. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 51 (1):175-179.score: 50.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. David H. Sanford (2001). Causal Asymmetries. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 62 (1):243-246.score: 50.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. John Collier (1999). Daniel M. Hausman, Causal Asymmetries Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 19 (5):339-341.score: 50.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. K. D. Hoover (2002). If Causation is Not Correlation, What is It? A Review of Daniel M. Hausman's Causal Asymmetries. Journal of Economic Methodology 9 (2):235-240.score: 50.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Barbara Osimani (2013). Until RCT-Proven? On the Asymmetry of Evidence Requirements for Risk Assessment. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (3):454-462.score: 48.0
    The problem of collecting, analyzing and evaluating evidence on adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is an example of the more general class of epistemological problems related to scientific inference and prediction, as well as a central problem of the health-care practice. Philosophical discussions have critically analysed the methodological pitfalls and epistemological implications of evidence assessment in medicine, however they have mainly focused on evidence of treatment efficacy. Most of this work is devoted to statistical methods of causal inference with a (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Henry Byerly (1990). Causes and Laws: The Asymmetry Puzzle. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1990:545 - 555.score: 44.0
    For many laws causal asymmetries in dependencies among the variables are not reflected in functional relations of the law equation. In the case of the simple pendulum law, why can we cite the length to explain the period but not the period to explain the length? After surveying attempts to explain the asymmetries, I propose a new account based on an analysis of the relation of causes and laws. This analysis is used to criticize the very notion of (...) laws and to clarify the role of ceteris paribus clauses in interpreting scientific laws. (shrink)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000