Search results for 'child abuse' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Child Sexual Abuse (forthcoming). Framework for a Church Response, Report of the Irish Catholic Bishops' Advisory Committee on Child Sexual Abuse by Priests and Religious. Veritas.score: 1440.0
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  2. Keith Bauer (2004). Covert Video Surveillance of Parents Suspected of Child Abuse: The British Experience and Alternative Approaches. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (4):311-327.score: 240.0
    One million cases of child maltreatment and twelve hundred child deaths due to abuse and neglect occur per year. But since many cases of abuse and neglect remain either unreported or unsubstantiated due to insufficient evidence, the number of children who are abused, neglected, and killed at the hands of family caregivers is probably higher. One approach to combat child abuse in the U.K. has been the employment of hospital-based covert video surveillance (CVS) to (...)
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  3. Heledd Hart & Katya Rubia (2012). Neuroimaging of Child Abuse: A Critical Review. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 240.0
    Childhood maltreatment is a severe stressor that can lead to the development of behaviour problems and affect brain structure and function. This review summarizes the current evidence for the effects of early childhood maltreatment on behavior, cognition and the brain in adults and children. Neuropsychological studies suggest an association between child abuse and deficits in IQ, memory, executive function and emotion discrimination. Structural neuroimaging studies provide evidence for deficits in brain volume, grey and white matter of several regions, (...)
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  4. Richard J. Gelles (1991). Physical Violence, Child Abuse, and Child Homicide. Human Nature 2 (1):59-72.score: 240.0
    The study of child abuse and child homicide has been based on the often implicit assumption that there is a continuum of violence ranging from mild physical punishment to severe abuse and homicide. Empirical data supporting this assumption are sparse. Existing data can be shown, however, to support an assumption that there are distinct forms of violence, not a continuum. This paper reviews these data and discusses their implications for the study of violence, abuse, and (...)
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  5. Anna Luise Kirkengen (2008). Inscriptions of Violence: Societal and Medical Neglect of Child Abuse – Impact on Life and Health. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (1):99-110.score: 216.0
    ObjectiveA sickness history from General Practice will be unfolded with regard to its implicit lived meanings. This experiential matrix will be analyzed with regard to its medico-theoretical aspects.MethodThe analysis is grounded in a phenomenology of the body. The patient Katherine Kaplan lends a particular portrait to the dynamics that are enacted in the interface between socially silenced domestic violence and the theoretical assumptions of human health as these inform the clinical practice of health care.ResultsBy applying an understanding of sickness that (...)
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  6. Helen De Cruz (2013). Is Teaching Children Young Earth Creationism Child Abuse? The Philosophers' Magazine 63:21-23.score: 180.0
    Richard Dawkins has argued on several occasions that bringing up your child religiously is a form of child abuse. According to Dawkins, teaching children about religion is fine (it helps them to understand cultural references, for instance), but indoctrinating children – by which Dawkins means any form of education that teaches religious beliefs as facts – is morally wrong and harmful. Dawkins is not alone: the American theoretical physicist Lawrence Krauss, for instance, recently argued that teaching Young (...)
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  7. Michael Benatar & David Benatar (2003). Between Prophylaxis and Child Abuse: The Ethics of Neonatal Male Circumcision. American Journal of Bioethics 3 (2):35-48.score: 180.0
    Opinion about neonatal male circumcision is deeply divided. Some take it to be a prophylactic measure with unequivocal and significant health benefits, while others consider it a form of child abuse. We argue against both these polar views. In doing so, we discuss whether circumcision constitutes bodily mutilation, whether the absence of the child's informed consent makes it wrong, the nature and strength of the evidence regarding medical harms and benefits, and what moral weight cultural considerations have. (...)
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  8. Jennifer Hoult (1998). Silencing the Victim: The Politics of Discrediting Child Abuse Survivors. Ethics and Behavior 8 (2):125 – 140.score: 180.0
    As a victim of child abuse who proved my claims in a landmark civil suit, there have been many attempts to silence and discredit me. This article provides an overview of my court case and its effects.
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  9. Benjamin H. Levi & Sharon G. Portwood (2011). Reasonable Suspicion of Child Abuse: Finding a Common Language. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (1):62-69.score: 180.0
    In the United States, the implementation of a successful system of mandated reporting of suspected child abuse continues to be plagued by the absence of a clear standard for when one must report. All 50 states of the U.S. have laws requiring certain individuals to report suspected child abuse. However, at present, there are variable thresholds for mandated reporting and no clear consensus on how existing thresholds should be interpreted. Because “child abuse” is often (...)
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  10. Joan E. Sieber (1994). Issues Presented by Mandatory Reporting Requirements to Researchers of Child Abuse and Neglect. Ethics and Behavior 4 (1):1 – 22.score: 180.0
    Mandatory reporting laws, which vary slightly from state to state, require reporting by helping professionals when there is reasonable cause to suspect child abuse. Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) require researchers to warn subjects of this duty to report, which may have a chilling effect on subject rapport and candor. Certificates of confidentiality, in conjunction with other precautions, may reduce some barriers to valid research. Attempts to resolve problems created by reporting laws must produce the most valid research, while (...)
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  11. Nancy K. Lewis (2003). Balancing the Dictates of Law and Ethical Practice: Empowerment of Female Survivors of Domestic Violence in the Presence of Overlapping Child Abuse. Ethics and Behavior 13 (4):353 – 366.score: 180.0
    Legal and ethical issues arise for clinicians working with female clients who are survivors of domestic violence and who have children. Statistics indicate that children of 30%-80% of such women are also abused. Disclosure by an abused woman of concurrent child abuse creates an ethical dilemma for the clinician involving adherence to mandatory reporting laws and the ethical duty to protect vs. ethical issues of confidentiality and respect for client autonomy. Potential resolution of this dilemma incorporates core tenets (...)
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  12. Marisha B. Liss (1994). Child Abuse: Is There a Mandate for Researchers to Report? Ethics and Behavior 4 (2):133 – 146.score: 180.0
    During the past 20 years, states have increasingly expanded the lists of individuals who are obligated to report their suspicions of child abuse and neglect. These legal requirements are juxtaposed with ethical considerations in research and professional practice. The ethical issues include the obligation to maintain both confidentiality of information provided by human participants and the safety and protection of these participants. This article reviews the types of state child abuse reporting statutes and outlines the categories (...)
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  13. David Archard (1992). Rights, Moral Values and Natural Facts: A Reply to Mary Midgley on the Problem of Child-Abuse. Journal of Applied Philosophy 9 (1):99-104.score: 180.0
    Mary Midgley asserts that my argument concerning the problem of child-abuse was inappropriately framed in the language of rights, and neglected certain pertinent natural facts. I defend the view that the use of rights-talk was both apposite and did not misrepresent the moral problem in question. I assess the status and character of the natural facts Midgley adduces in criticism of my case, concluding that they do not obviously establish the conclusions she believes they do. Finally I briefly (...)
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  14. Helen McLaren (2007). Exploring the Ethics of Forewarning: Social Workers, Confidentiality and Potential Child Abuse Disclosures. Ethics and Social Welfare 1 (1):22-40.score: 180.0
    This article reports on exploratory research into social workers? perceptions and actions regarding ?forewarning? clients of their child abuse reporting obligations as a limitation of confidentiality at relationship onset. Ethical principles and previous research on forewarning are discussed prior to stating the research methods and presenting findings. Data obtained from South Australian social workers engaged in human service work with adult family members articulate a strong desire to practise in accordance with professional codes of ethics. However, the findings (...)
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  15. D. Evans (1995). The Investigation of Life-Threatening Child Abuse and Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy. Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (1):9-13.score: 180.0
    The use of covert video surveillance in the investigation of suspected life-threatening child abuse and Munchausen syndrome by proxy raises important ethical questions. That the recently reported provision of this facility in North Staffordshire was not presented to a Local Research Ethics Committee (LREC) for approval as a research exercise raises important questions about the ethical review of research and practice. The case made for avoiding such review is first set out and then examined. The three main premisses (...)
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  16. David Archard (1990). Child Abuse: Parental Rights and the Interests of the Child. Journal of Applied Philosophy 7 (2):183-194.score: 174.0
    I criticise the ‘liberal’view of the proper relationship between the family and State, namely that, although the interests of the child should be paramount, parents are entitled to rights of both privacy and autonomy which should be abrogated only when the child suffers a specifiable harm. I argue that the right to bear children is not absolute, and that it only grounds a right to rear upon an objectionable proprietarian picture of the child as owned by its (...)
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  17. J. Harris (1985). Child Abuse and Neglect: Ethical Issues. Journal of Medical Ethics 11 (3):138-141.score: 152.0
    Children may be abused physically, sexually, emotionally and by omission or commission in any permutation under these headings. This is discussed in terms of the separate and overlapping responsibilities of parents, guardians, the community in which they live and the network of professional services developed to care for, protect and educate children. An attempt is made to place these issues within an ethical framework, with regard to the legislature of England and Wales. It is argued that professionals working within this (...)
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  18. Ian Hacking (1988). Symposium Papers, Comments and an Abstract: The Sociology of Knowledge About Child Abuse. Noûs 22 (1):53-63.score: 150.0
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  19. Carl Hedman (2000). Three Approaches to the Problem of Child Abuse and Neglect. Journal of Social Philosophy 31 (3):268–285.score: 150.0
  20. Bruno Latour (1988). Symposium Papers, Comments and an Abstract: Comments on "the Sociology of Knowledge About Child Abuse". Noûs 22 (1):67-69.score: 150.0
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  21. Mary Midgley (1991). Rights-Talk Will Not Sort Out Child-Abuse: Comment on Archard on Parental Rights. Journal of Applied Philosophy 8 (1):103-114.score: 150.0
  22. James E. Swain (2006). Epigenetic Effects of Child Abuse and Neglect Propagate Human Cruelty. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):242-243.score: 150.0
    The nature of children's early environment has profound long-term consequences. We are beginning to understand the underlying molecular programming of the stress-response system, which may mediate the destructive long-term effects of cruelty to children, explain the evolutionary stability of cruelty, and provide opportunities for its reversal of early trauma.
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  23. James Bogen (1988). Symposium Papers, Comments and an Abstract: Comments on "the Sociology of Knowledge About Child Abuse". Noûs 22 (1):65-66.score: 150.0
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  24. David Archard, Can Child Abuse Be Defined?score: 150.0
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  25. Kenneth A. Ville & Loretta M. Kopelman (1999). Fetal Protection in Wisconsin's Revised Child Abuse Law: Right Goal, Wrong Remedy. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 27 (4):332-342.score: 150.0
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  26. John Briere (1995). Child Abuse, Memory, and Recall: A Commentary. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (1):83-87.score: 150.0
  27. Ian Hacking (1991). The Making and Molding of Child Abuse. Critical Inquiry 17 (2):253.score: 150.0
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  28. Edmund G. Howe (2008). Child Abuse: How Society and Careproviders Should Respond. Journal of Clinical Ethics 19 (4):307.score: 150.0
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  29. Marcella Smith (2003). Child Safety: Homicide by Child Abuse: South Carolina Upholds Conviction Under "Crack Mom" Law. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (3):457-458.score: 150.0
  30. R. Bahari (2009). The Survey of Effective Factors on Physical Child Abuse Crisis Handling Center at the City of Tehran. Social Research 2 (4):129-152.score: 150.0
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  31. J. Grady (1983). The Manufacture and Consumption of Child Abuse as a Social Issue. Telos 1983 (56):111-118.score: 150.0
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  32. G. Simon Harak (1995). Child Abuse and Embodiment From a Thomistic Perspective. Modern Theology 11 (3):315-340.score: 150.0
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  33. Andrea Kemper, Michael Kölch, Heiner Fangerau & Jörg M. Fegert (2010). Medical Confidentiality and Child Abuse: Does New Child Protection Law Bring Clear Practical Guidelines for Medical Professionals in Germany? Ethik in der Medizin 22 (1):33-47.score: 150.0
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  34. Seema Malhotra, Afroz Alam & Vinay Gupta (2013). Child Abuse and Neglect: Role of Dentist in Detection and Reporting. Journal of Education and Ethics in Dentistry 3 (1):2.score: 150.0
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  35. Innaiah Narisetti (2003). Child Abuse by Religions. Free Inquiry 23 (3).score: 150.0
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  36. Francoise Baylis & Jocelyn Downie (1997). Child Abuse and Neglect: Cross-Cultural Considerations. In Hilde Lindemann (ed.), Feminism and Families. Routledge. 173--187.score: 150.0
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  37. Richard Bourne, Eli H. Newberger & C. Sue White (forthcoming). Mandated Child Abuse Reporting. Ethics and Behavior.score: 150.0
  38. Edward W. Collins (1987). Why Agencies Cannot Cope with Child Abuse. Hastings Center Report 17 (2):46-46.score: 150.0
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  39. D. R. Cooley (2009). Environmental Tobacco Smoke as Child Abuse or Endangerment: A Case for Expanded Regulation. Public Affairs Quarterly 23 (3):181-201.score: 150.0
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  40. Stephen Fleck (1986). Abortion and Child Abuse: A Missing Link. Hastings Center Report 16 (6):27-27.score: 150.0
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  41. Marie-Louise Friquegnon (1991). The Rights of Child Abuse Victims. In D. Sank & D. Caplan (eds.), To Be a Victim. Plenum. 161.score: 150.0
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  42. David B. Givens (1978). Contrasting Nonverbal Styles in Mother-Child Interaction: Examples From a Study of Child Abuse. Semiotica 24 (1-2).score: 150.0
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  43. Laura Hazard (1985). Mental Child Abuse. Hastings Center Report 15 (1):48-48.score: 150.0
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  44. E. Swain James (2006). Epigenetic Effects of Child Abuse and Neglect Propagate Human Cruelty. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3).score: 150.0
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  45. Stephen M. Krason (2013). Child Abuse, Family Rights, and the Child Protective System: A Critical Analysis From Law, Ethics, and Catholic Social Teaching. Scarecrow Press.score: 150.0
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  46. C. E. Okong (2008). Perception of Parental Child Abuse and Cult Membership of Adolescents in Cross River State. Sophia: An African Journal of Philosophy 9 (2).score: 150.0
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  47. Subpart A.—General Provisions (forthcoming). 8 Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention and Treatment. Bioethics: Basic Writings on the Key Ethical Questions That Surround the Major, Modern Biological Possibilities and Problems.score: 150.0
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  48. John A. Robertson (2004). Extreme Prematurity and Parental Rights After Baby Doe: The Child Abuse Amendments of 1984 Established the Norms for Treating Disabled Newborns, but They Did Not Address the Treatment of Premature Babies. Parents and Physicians Need a Framework for Decisionmaking. A Decision Handed Down Recently by the Texas Supreme Court Is a Step Forward. Hastings Center Report 34 (4):32.score: 150.0
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  49. A. M. Smith (1992). Child Abuse. Journal of Medical Ethics 18 (3):164-165.score: 150.0
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  50. Mark C. Vopat (2013). Child Abuse and Neglect. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 150.0
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