Search results for 'child neglect' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Michael McFall (2009). Licensing Parents: Family, State, and Child Maltreatment. Rowman and Littlefield.score: 45.0
    In Licensing Parents, Michael McFall argues that political structures, economics, education, racism, and sexism are secondary in importance to the inequality caused by families, and that the family plays the primary role in a child's acquisition of a sense of justice. He demonstrates that examination of the family is necessary in political philosophy and that informal structures (families) and considerations (character formation) must be taken seriously. McFall advocates a threshold that should be accepted by all political philosophers: children should (...)
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  2. Hilda Lewis (1963). Delinquency and Child Neglect. The Eugenics Review 55 (2):114.score: 45.0
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  3. Anna Luise Kirkengen (2008). Inscriptions of Violence: Societal and Medical Neglect of Child Abuse – Impact on Life and Health. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (1):99-110.score: 42.0
    ObjectiveA sickness history from General Practice will be unfolded with regard to its implicit lived meanings. This experiential matrix will be analyzed with regard to its medico-theoretical aspects.MethodThe analysis is grounded in a phenomenology of the body. The patient Katherine Kaplan lends a particular portrait to the dynamics that are enacted in the interface between socially silenced domestic violence and the theoretical assumptions of human health as these inform the clinical practice of health care.ResultsBy applying an understanding of sickness that (...)
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  4. Joan E. Sieber (1994). Issues Presented by Mandatory Reporting Requirements to Researchers of Child Abuse and Neglect. Ethics and Behavior 4 (1):1 – 22.score: 39.0
    Mandatory reporting laws, which vary slightly from state to state, require reporting by helping professionals when there is reasonable cause to suspect child abuse. Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) require researchers to warn subjects of this duty to report, which may have a chilling effect on subject rapport and candor. Certificates of confidentiality, in conjunction with other precautions, may reduce some barriers to valid research. Attempts to resolve problems created by reporting laws must produce the most valid research, while minimizing (...)
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  5. Carl Hedman (2000). Three Approaches to the Problem of Child Abuse and Neglect. Journal of Social Philosophy 31 (3):268–285.score: 36.0
  6. James E. Swain (2006). Epigenetic Effects of Child Abuse and Neglect Propagate Human Cruelty. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):242-243.score: 36.0
    The nature of children's early environment has profound long-term consequences. We are beginning to understand the underlying molecular programming of the stress-response system, which may mediate the destructive long-term effects of cruelty to children, explain the evolutionary stability of cruelty, and provide opportunities for its reversal of early trauma.
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  7. J. Harris (1985). Child Abuse and Neglect: Ethical Issues. Journal of Medical Ethics 11 (3):138-141.score: 36.0
    Children may be abused physically, sexually, emotionally and by omission or commission in any permutation under these headings. This is discussed in terms of the separate and overlapping responsibilities of parents, guardians, the community in which they live and the network of professional services developed to care for, protect and educate children. An attempt is made to place these issues within an ethical framework, with regard to the legislature of England and Wales. It is argued that professionals working within this (...)
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  8. Francoise Baylis & Jocelyn Downie (1997). Child Abuse and Neglect: Cross-Cultural Considerations. In Hilde Lindemann (ed.), Feminism and Families. Routledge. 173--187.score: 36.0
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  9. E. Swain James (2006). Epigenetic Effects of Child Abuse and Neglect Propagate Human Cruelty. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3).score: 36.0
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  10. Seema Malhotra, Afroz Alam & Vinay Gupta (2013). Child Abuse and Neglect: Role of Dentist in Detection and Reporting. Journal of Education and Ethics in Dentistry 3 (1):2.score: 36.0
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  11. Subpart A.—General Provisions (forthcoming). 8 Child Abuse and Neglect Prevention and Treatment. Bioethics: Basic Writings on the Key Ethical Questions That Surround the Major, Modern Biological Possibilities and Problems.score: 36.0
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  12. Mark C. Vopat (2013). Child Abuse and Neglect. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 36.0
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  13. Margo I. Wilson, Martin Daly & Suzanne J. Weghorst (1980). Household Composition and the Risk of Child Abuse and Neglect. Journal of Biosocial Science 12 (3).score: 36.0
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  14. Lee Cronk (1991). Preferential Parental Investment in Daughters Over Sons. Human Nature 2 (4):387-417.score: 30.0
    Female-biased parental investment is unusual but not unknown in human societies. Relevant explanatory models include Fisher’s principle, the Trivers-Willard model, local mate and resource competition and enhancement, and economic rational actor models. Possible evidence of female-biased parental investment includes sex ratios, mortality rates, parents’ stated preferences for offspring of one sex, and direct and indirect measurements of actual parental behavior. Possible examples of female-biased parental investment include the Mukogodo of Kenya, the Ifalukese of Micronesia, the Cheyenne of North America, the (...)
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  15. Keith Bauer (2004). Covert Video Surveillance of Parents Suspected of Child Abuse: The British Experience and Alternative Approaches. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (4):311-327.score: 27.0
    One million cases of child maltreatment and twelve hundred child deaths due to abuse and neglect occur per year. But since many cases of abuse and neglect remain either unreported or unsubstantiated due to insufficient evidence, the number of children who are abused, neglected, and killed at the hands of family caregivers is probably higher. One approach to combat child abuse in the U.K. has been the employment of hospital-based covert video surveillance (CVS) to monitor (...)
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  16. Lars Alberth (2013). Body Techniques of Vulnerability: The Generational Order and the Body in Child Protection Services. Human Studies 36 (1):67-88.score: 27.0
    The paper seeks to analyze children’s bodily vulnerability as grounded in generational order. The thesis is put forward, that the generational order is embodied via body techniques of vulnerability, deployed both by adults and children. In presenting results from research on professional responses to child maltreatment and neglect, three sets of age related body techniques of vulnerability are identified, concerning caregivers, professionals and the children itself.
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  17. Linda J. Graham (2008). Child-Rearing Inc.: On the Perils of Political Paralysis Down Under. Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (6):739-746.score: 27.0
    In his 2007 PESA keynote address, Paul Smeyers discussed the increasing regulation of child-rearing through government intervention and the generation of 'experts', citing particular examples from Europe where cases of childhood obesity and parental neglect have stirred public opinion and political debate. In his paper ('Child-Rearing: On government intervention and the discourse of experts', this issue), Smeyers touches on a number of tensions before concluding that child-rearing qualifies as a practice in which liberal governments should be (...)
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  18. Andrea Kemper, Michael Kölch, Heiner Fangerau & Jörg M. Fegert (2010). Ärztliche Schweigepflicht bei Kindeswohlgefährdung. Ethik in der Medizin 22 (1):33-47.score: 24.0
    Die Schweigepflicht, einer der Grundpfeiler medizinischer Ethik, spielt in der aktuellen Diskussion um die Verbesserung des Kinderschutzes eine zentrale Rolle. Unklare und mehrdeutige gesetzliche Regelungen und Handlungsanweisungen, wie mit Anhaltspunkten für eine Kindeswohlgefährdung umzugehen ist, wenn die Sorgeberechtigten eine weitergehende Hilfe ablehnen, werden als Hindernis für einen wirksamen Kinderschutz betrachtet. Aus der schwer durchschaubaren Rechtslage resultieren für Angehörige der Gesundheitsberufe regelmäßig Handlungsunsicherheiten, die im Einzelfall notwendige Hilfe verzögern oder gar verhindern könnten. Neue Gesetze auf Länderebene haben deshalb im Sinne eines (...)
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  19. Jason K. M. Hanna (2010). Revisiting Child-Based Objections to Commercial Surrogacy. Bioethics 24 (7):341-347.score: 21.0
    Many critics of commercial surrogate motherhood argue that it violates the rights of children. In this paper, I respond to several versions of this objection. The most common version claims that surrogacy involves child-selling. I argue that while proponents of surrogacy have generally failed to provide an adequate response to this objection, it can be overcome. After showing that the two most prominent arguments for the child-selling objection fail, I explain how the commissioning couple can acquire parental rights (...)
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  20. Bruce D. Perry (2002). Childhood Experience and the Expression of Genetic Potential: What Childhood Neglect Tells Us About Nature and Nurture. [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 3 (1):79-100.score: 21.0
    Studies of childhood abuse and neglect haveimportant lessons for considerations of natureand nurture. While each child has uniquegenetic potentials, both human and animalstudies point to important needs that everychild has, and severe long-term consequencesfor brain function if those needs are not met. The effects of the childhood environment,favorable or unfavorable, interact with all theprocesses of neurodevelopment (neurogenesis,migration, differentiation, apoptosis,arborization, synaptogenesis, synapticsculpting, and myelination). The time coursesof all these neural processes are reviewed herealong with statements of core principles forboth (...)
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  21. Marisha B. Liss (1994). Child Abuse: Is There a Mandate for Researchers to Report? Ethics and Behavior 4 (2):133 – 146.score: 21.0
    During the past 20 years, states have increasingly expanded the lists of individuals who are obligated to report their suspicions of child abuse and neglect. These legal requirements are juxtaposed with ethical considerations in research and professional practice. The ethical issues include the obligation to maintain both confidentiality of information provided by human participants and the safety and protection of these participants. This article reviews the types of state child abuse reporting statutes and outlines the categories of (...)
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  22. Atsushi Asai & Hiroko Ishimoto (2013). Should We Maintain Baby Hatches in Our Society? BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):1-7.score: 21.0
    BackgroundA baby hatch called the “Stork’s Cradle” has been in place at Jikei Hospital in Kumamoto City, Japan, since May 10, 2007. Babyklappes were first established in Germany in 2000, and there are currently more than 90 locations. Attitudes regarding baby hatches are divided in Japan and neither opinions for nor against baby hatches have thus far been overwhelming. To consider the appropriateness of baby hatches, we present and examine the validity of each major objection to establishing baby hatches.DiscussionThere are (...)
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  23. Carol van Nijnatten (2010). Children's Agency, Children's Welfare: A Dialogical Approach to Child Development, Policy and Practice. Policy Press.score: 18.0
    Contributing to current debates about child welfare and child protection, this book provides a holistic view of how children develop agency, combining social, ...
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  24. Ans Kolk & Rob van Tuldere (2002). Child Labor and Multinational Conduct: A Comparison of International Business Andstakeholder Codes. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 36 (3):291-301.score: 18.0
    Increasing attention to the issue of child labor has been reflected in codes of conduct that emerged in the past decade in particular. This paper examines the way in which multinationals, business associations, governmental and non-governmental organizations deal with child labor in their codes. With a standardized framework, it analyzes 55 codes drawn up by these different actors to influence firms external, societal behavior. The exploratory study helps to identify the main issues related to child labor and (...)
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  25. Stefan Ramaekers & Paul Smeyers (2008). Child Rearing: Passivity and Being Able to Go On. Wittgenstein on Shared Practices and Seeing Aspects. Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (5):638-651.score: 18.0
    It is not uncommon to hear parents say in discussions they have with their children 'Look at it this way'. And called upon for their advice, counsellors too say something to adults with the significance of 'Try to see it like this'. The change of someone's perspective in the context of child rearing is the focus of this paper. Our interest in this lies not so much in giving an answer to the practical problems that are at stake, but (...)
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  26. Samantha Brennan & Robert Noggle, Rawls's Neglected Childhood: Reflections on the Original Position, Stability, and the Child's Sense of Justice.score: 18.0
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  27. Paul Smeyers (2008). Child-Rearing: On Government Intervention and the Discourse of Experts. Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (6):719-738.score: 18.0
    For Kant, education was understood as the 'means' to become human—and that is to say, rational. For Rousseau by contrast, and the many child-centred educators that followed him, the adult world, far from representing reason, is essentially corrupt and given over to the superficialities of worldly vanity. On this view, the child, as a product of nature, is essentially good and will learn all she needs to know from experience. Both positions have their own problems, but beyond this (...)
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  28. John Harris (2000). The Welfare of the Child. Health Care Analysis 8 (1):27-34.score: 18.0
    The interests or welfare of the child are rightly central to anydiscussion of the ethics of reproduction. The problematic nature of thislegitimate concern is seldom, if ever, noticed or if it is, it ismisunderstood. A prominent example of this sort of misunderstandingoccurs in the Department of Health's recent and important `SurrogacyReview' chaired by Margaret Brazier (The Brazier Report) and thesame misunderstanding makes nonsense of at least one provision of theHuman Fertilization and Embryology Act 1990. (The HFE Act).This paper explores (...)
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  29. Wilma C. Rossi, William Reynolds & Robert M. Nelson (2003). Child Assent and Parental Permission in Pediatric Research. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 24 (2):131-148.score: 18.0
    Since children are considered incapable ofgiving informed consent to participate inresearch, regulations require that bothparental permission and the assent of thepotential child subject be obtained. Assent andpermission are uniquely bound together, eachserving a different purpose. Parentalpermission protects the child from assumingunreasonable risks. Assent demonstrates respectfor the child and his developing autonomy. Inorder to give meaningful assent, the child mustunderstand that procedures will be performed,voluntarily choose to undergo the procedures,and communicate this choice. Understanding theelements of informed consent (...)
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  30. Christina Schües & Christoph Rehmann-Sutter (2013). The Well- and Unwell-Being of a Child. Topoi 32 (2):197-205.score: 18.0
    The concept of the ‘well-being of the child’ (like the ‘child’s welfare’ and ‘best interests of the child’) has remained underdetermined in legal and ethical texts on the needs and rights of children. As a hypothetical construct that draws attention to the child’s long-term welfare, the well-being of the child is a broader concept than autonomy and happiness. This paper clarifies some conceptual issues of the well-being of the child from a philosophical point of (...)
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  31. Barbara Stumper, Colin Bannard, Elena Lieven & Michael Tomasello (2011). “Frequent Frames” in German Child-Directed Speech: A Limited Cue to Grammatical Categories. Cognitive Science 35 (6):1190-1205.score: 18.0
    Mintz (2003) found that in English child-directed speech, frequently occurring frames formed by linking the preceding (A) and succeeding (B) word (A_x_B) could accurately predict the syntactic category of the intervening word (x). This has been successfully extended to French (Chemla, Mintz, Bernal, & Christophe, 2009). In this paper, we show that, as for Dutch (Erkelens, 2009), frequent frames in German do not enable such accurate lexical categorization. This can be explained by the characteristics of German including a less (...)
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  32. Michael Peters (2001). Wittgensteinian Pedagogics: Cavell on the Figure of the Child in the Investigations. Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (2):125-138.score: 18.0
    This paper discusses Stanley Cavell's approach to the Investigations,focusing upon his essay – `Notes and Afterthoughts on the Opening ofWittgenstein's Investigations'. First, the paper investigates the waysin which Cavell makes central the figure and `voice' of the child to hisreading of the opening of the Investigations. Second, it argues thatCavell's Notes provides a basis for a Wittgensteinian pedagogics,for not only does it hold up the figure of the child as central to the Investigations but it does so in (...)
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  33. Bill Wringe (2011). Cognitive Individualism and the Child as Scientist Program. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 42 (4):518-529.score: 18.0
    n this paper, I examine the charge that Gopnik and Meltzoff’s ‘Child as Scientist’ program, outlined and defended in their 1997 book Words, Thoughts and Theories is vitiated by a form of ‘cognitive individualism’ about science. Although this charge has often been leveled at Gopnik and Meltzoff’s work, it has rarely been developed in any detail. -/- I suggest that we should distinguish between two forms of cognitive individualism which I refer to as ‘ontic’ and ‘epistemic’ cognitive individualism (OCI (...)
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  34. Juliet Tizzard (2004). Sex Selection, Child Welfare and Risk: A Critique of the HFEA's Recommendations on Sex Selection. Health Care Analysis 12 (1):61-68.score: 18.0
    This paper will examine the recent Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority public consultation on sex selection. It will review the current regulation on sex selection in the United Kingdom and critically examine the outcomes of the HFEA consultation. The paper will argue that the current ban on embryo sex selection for social reasons and a proposed ban on sperm selection are not justified. There is no evidence for sex selection causing an increase in sex discrimination; creating a slippery slope towards (...)
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  35. Damian H. Adams (2013). Conceptualising a Child-Centric Paradigm. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (3):369-381.score: 18.0
    Since its inception, donor conception practices have been a reproductive choice for the infertile. Past and current practices have the potential to cause significant and lifelong harm to the offspring through loss of kinship, heritage, identity, and family health history, and possibly through introducing physical problems. Legislation and regulation in Australia that specifies that the welfare of the child born as a consequence of donor conception is paramount may therefore be in conflict with the outcomes. Altering the paradigm to (...)
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  36. Marion Thomas (2005). Are Animals Just Noisy Machines?: Louis Boutan and the Co-Invention of Animal and Child Psychology in the French Third Republic. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 38 (3):425 - 460.score: 18.0
    Historians of science have only just begun to sample the wealth of different approaches to the study of animal behavior undertaken in the twentieth century. To date, more attention has been given to Lorenzian ethology and American behaviorism than to other work and traditions, but different approaches are equally worthy of the historian's attention, reflecting not only the broader range of questions that could be asked about animal behavior and the "animal mind" but also the different contexts in which these (...)
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  37. Bernadette Baker (2003). Plato's Child and the Limit-Points of Educational Theories. Studies in Philosophy and Education 22 (6):439-474.score: 18.0
    This paper analyzes how the figure of the childhas been used to authorize a series ofboundaries that have constituted thelimit-points of educational theories orphilosophies. Limit-points are the conceptualboundaries that educational theories produce,move within, respond to, and make use ofbecause the perception is that they cannot beargued away or around at the time. A method ofcomparative historico-philosophy is used tocontrast limit-points in Platonic figurationsof the child and education with childcenteredand eugenic theories of the late nineteenth andtwentieth century West. The figuration (...)
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  38. Anna Berti (2002). Unconscious Processing in Neglect. In Hans-Otto Karnath, David Milner & Giuseppe Vallar (eds.), The Cognitive and Neural Bases of Spatial Neglect. Oxford University Press. 313-326.score: 18.0
     
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  39. Jeffrey Blustein (2012). Doing the Best for One's Child: Satisficing Versus Optimizing Parentalism. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (3):199-205.score: 18.0
    The maxim “parents should do what is in the best interests of their child” seems like an unassailable truth, and yet, as I argue here, there are serious problems with it when it is taken seriously. One problem concerns the sort of demands such a principle places on parents; the other concerns its larger social implications when conceived as part of a national policy for the rearing of children. The theory of parenting that creates these problems I call “optimizing (...)
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  40. Timothy Adair (2009). Unmet Need for Contraception Among HIV-Positive Women in Lesotho and Implications for Mother-to-Child Transmission. Journal of Biosocial Science 41 (2):269-278.score: 18.0
    In Lesotho, the risk of mother-to-child-transmission (MTCT) of HIV is substantial; women of childbearing age have a high HIV prevalence rate (26·4%), low knowledge of HIV status and a total fertility rate of 3·5 births per woman. An effective means of preventing MTCT is to reduce unwanted fertility. This paper examines the unmet need for contraception to limit and space births among HIV-positive women in Lesotho aged 15–49 years, using the 2004 Lesotho Demographic and Health Survey. HIV-positive women have (...)
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  41. Linas Žalnieriūnas & Tomas Girdenis (2013). Problematic Qualification Aspects of the Avoidance to Maintain a Child and Alternative Ways of Child Maintenance. Jurisprudence 20 (2):707-724.score: 18.0
    The article analyzes one of the fundamental rights – the right to maintenance, which proper implementation ensures normal development of the child. This right matches with the duty of parents to maintain their minor children. Paragraph 6 of Article 38 of the Constitution of the Republic of Lithuania states that parents have a duty to educate their children to be honest people and loyal citizens, supporting them until adulthood. The obligation to maintain children is established in the first 3.192 (...)
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  42. Stefan B. Andrade & Inger Anneberg (2014). Farmers Under Pressure. Analysis of the Social Conditions of Cases of Animal Neglect. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (1):103-126.score: 18.0
    In this paper we analyse how risk factors in highly industrialised agriculture are connected to animal neglect. With Danish agriculture as a case study, we use two types of data. First, we use register data from Statistics Denmark to map how risk factors such as farmers’ financial and social troubles are connected to convictions of neglect. Second, we analyse narratives where interviewed farmers, involved in cases of neglect, describe how they themselves experienced the incidents. We find that (...)
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  43. Tamas Bereczkei & Andras Csanaky (1996). Evolutionary Pathway of Child Development. Human Nature 7 (3):257-280.score: 18.0
    An evolutionary theory of socialization suggests that children from father-absent families will mature earlier, and form less-stable pair bonds, compared with those from father-present families. Using a sample of about 1,000 persons the recent study focuses on elements of father-absent children’s behavior that could be better explained by a Darwinian approach than by rival social science theories. As a result of their enhanced interest in male competition, father-absent boys were found to engage in rule-breaking behavior more intensively than father-present boys. (...)
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  44. M. Bonato (2011). Neglect and Extinction Depend Greatly on Task Demands: A Review. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:195-195.score: 18.0
    This review illustrates how, after unilateral brain damage, the presence and severity of spatial awareness deficits for the contralesional hemispace depend greatly on the quantity of attentional resources available for performance. After a brief description of neglect and extinction, different frameworks accounting for spatial and non-spatial attentional processes will be outlined. The central part of the review will describe how the performance of brain damaged patients is negatively affected by increased task demands, which can result in the emergence of (...)
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  45. Paresh A. Malhotra Charlotte Russell, Korina Li (2013). Harnessing Motivation to Alleviate Neglect. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    The syndrome of spatial neglect results from the combination of a number of deficits in attention, with patients demonstrating both spatially lateralised and non-lateralised impairments. Previous reports have hinted that there may be a motivational component to neglect and that modulating this might alleviate some of the debilitating symptoms. Additionally, recent work on the effects of reward on attention in healthy participants has revealed improvements across a number of paradigms. As the primary deficit in neglect has been (...)
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  46. Magdalena Chechlacz, Pia Rotshtein & Glyn W. Humphreys (2012). Neuroanatomical Dissections of Unilateral Visual Neglect Symptoms: ALE Meta-Analysis of Lesion-Symptom Mapping. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:230-230.score: 18.0
    Unilateral visual neglect is commonly defined as impaired ability to attend to stimuli presented on the side of visual space contralateral to the brain lesion. However, behavioural analyses indicate that different neglect symptoms can dissociate. The neuroanatomy of the syndrome has been hotly debated. Some groups have argued that the syndrome is linked to posterior parietal cortex lesions, while others report damage within regions including the superior temporal gyrus, insula and basal ganglia. Several recent neuroimaging studies provide evidence (...)
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  47. James Danckert Christopher L. Striemer, Susanne Ferber (2013). Spatial Working Memory Deficits Represent a Core Challenge for Rehabilitating Neglect. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    Left neglect following right hemisphere injury is a debilitating disorder that has proven extremely difficult to rehabilitate. Traditional models of neglect have focused on impaired spatial attention as the core deficit and as such, most rehabilitation methods have tried to improve attentional processes. However, many of these techniques (e.g., visual scanning training, caloric stimulation, neck muscle vibration) produce only short-lived effects, or are too uncomfortable to use as a routine treatment. More recently, many investigators have begun examining the (...)
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  48. Janet Cotterill (2011). Mugshots and Motherhood: The Media Semiotics of Vilification in Child Abduction Cases. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 24 (4):447-470.score: 18.0
    The Shannon Matthews case was perhaps unique in British criminal history. For a period of several days, a young girl of 9 years of age was missing from home. During this period there was an unprecedented amount of both police and media attention devoted to the case, including TV appeals for her safe return and offers of financial rewards for information leading to her recovery. Ultimately, it emerged that the mother of the child had conspired with the child’s (...)
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  49. Martin Daly & Gretchen Perry (2011). Has the Child Welfare Profession Discovered Nepotistic Biases? Human Nature 22 (3):350-369.score: 18.0
    A major trend in foster care in developed countries over the past quarter century has been a shift toward placing children with “kin” rather than with unrelated foster parents. This change in practice is widely backed by legislation and is routinely justified as being in the best interests of the child. It is tempting to interpret this change as indicating that the child welfare profession has belatedly discovered that human social sentiments are nepotistic in their design, such that (...)
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  50. Kristie R. Dukewich, Gail A. Eskes, Michael A. Lawrence, Mary Beth MacIsaac, Stephen J. Phillips & Raymond M. Klein (2012). Speed Impairs Attending on the Left: Comparing Attentional Asymmetries for Neglect Patients in Speeded and Unspeeded Cueing Tasks. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 18.0
    Visuospatial neglect after stroke is often characterized by a disengage deficit on a cued orienting task, in which individuals are disproportionately slower to respond to targets presented on the contralesional side of space following an ispilesional cue as compared to the reverse. The purpose of this study was to investigate the generality of the finding of a disengage deficit on another measure of cued attention, the temporal order judgment (TOJ) task, that does not depend upon speeded manual responses. Individuals (...)
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