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Search results for 'child support' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Elizabeth Brake (2005). Fatherhood and Child Support: Do Men Have a Right to Choose? Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (1):55–73.score: 150.0
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  2. William Child (2009). Wittgenstein, Dreaming and Anti-Realism: A Reply to Richard Scheer. Philosophical Investigations 32 (4):329-337.score: 120.0
    I have argued that Wittgenstein's treatment of dreaming involves a kind of anti-realism about the past: what makes "I dreamed p " true is, roughly, that I wake with the feeling or impression of having dreamed p . Richard Scheer raises three objections. First, that the texts do not support my interpretation. Second, that the anti-realist view of dreaming does not make sense, so cannot be Wittgenstein's view. Third, that the anti-realist view leaves it a mystery why someone who (...)
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  3. Patricia Major (2010). Book Review of Time to Care: Redesigning Child Care to Promote Education, Support Families, and Build Communities. [REVIEW] Educational Studies 38 (1):72-76.score: 96.0
    (2005). BOOK REVIEW of Time to Care: Redesigning Child Care to Promote Education, Support Families, and Build Communities. Educational Studies: Vol. 38, No. 1, pp. 72-76.
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  4. Rebecca Boden & Mary Childs (1996). Paying for Procreation: Child Support Arrangements in the UK. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 4 (2):131-157.score: 92.0
    Under the present system it is a very good thing to remain happily married, I have to tell you!
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  5. Inga Kudinavičiūtė-Michailovienė & Jolanta Vėgelienė (2012). Child Maintenance: Several Topical Theoretical and Practical Aspects. Jurisprudence 19 (1):209-229.score: 90.0
    The Constitution of the Republic of Lithuania1 determines that both parents have to maintain their minors, while the state has to establish conditions under which parents would be able to do their duties, i.e. undertakes responsibility to maintain the children who lack the maintenance from their parents. Latter obligations are concretized in the Civil Code of the Republic of Lithuania2 (3.192–3.204 art.). It also anticipates the principles under which the child’s maintenance should be provided, its forms, size criteria and (...)
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  6. Cindy Elmore (2010). On and On, Over and Over: The Gender War in Child Support Enforcement Court. Feminist Studies 36 (2):397-403.score: 90.0
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  7. Francie Lund (2012). 18 Children, Citizenship and Child Support: The Child Support Grant in Post-Apartheid South Africa. Proceedings of the British Academy 182:475.score: 90.0
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  8. Linas Žalnieriūnas & Tomas Girdenis (2013). Problematic Qualification Aspects of the Avoidance to Maintain a Child and Alternative Ways of Child Maintenance. Jurisprudence 20 (2):707-724.score: 60.0
    The article analyzes one of the fundamental rights – the right to maintenance, which proper implementation ensures normal development of the child. This right matches with the duty of parents to maintain their minor children. Paragraph 6 of Article 38 of the Constitution of the Republic of Lithuania states that parents have a duty to educate their children to be honest people and loyal citizens, supporting them until adulthood. The obligation to maintain children is established in the first 3.192 (...)
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  9. Andrea Beetz, Henri Julius, Dennis Turner & Kurt Kotrschal (2012). Effects of Social Support by a Dog on Stress Modulation in Male Children with Insecure Attachment. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 54.0
    Up to 90% of children with special education needs and about 40% of children in the general population show insecure or disorganized attachment patterns, which are linked to a diminished ability to use social support by others for the regulation of stress. The aim of the study was to investigate if children with insecure-avoidant/disorganized attachment can profit more from social support by a dog compared to a friendly human during a stressful task. We investigated 47 male children (age (...)
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  10. Linda J. Graham (2008). Child-Rearing Inc.: On the Perils of Political Paralysis Down Under. Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (6):739-746.score: 54.0
    In his 2007 PESA keynote address, Paul Smeyers discussed the increasing regulation of child-rearing through government intervention and the generation of 'experts', citing particular examples from Europe where cases of childhood obesity and parental neglect have stirred public opinion and political debate. In his paper ('Child-Rearing: On government intervention and the discourse of experts', this issue), Smeyers touches on a number of tensions before concluding that child-rearing qualifies as a practice in which liberal governments should be reluctant (...)
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  11. Daniel Yurovsky, Chen Yu & Linda B. Smith (2012). Statistical Speech Segmentation and Word Learning in Parallel: Scaffolding From Child-Directed Speech. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 54.0
    In order to acquire their native languages, children must learn richly structured systems with regularities at multiple levels. While structure at different levels could be learned serially, e.g. speech segmentation coming before word-object mapping, redundancies across levels make parallel learning more efficient. For instance, a series of syllables is likely to be a word not only because of high transitional probabilities, but also because of a consistently co-occurring object. But additional statistics require additional processing, and thus might not be useful (...)
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  12. Heledd Hart & Katya Rubia (2012). Neuroimaging of Child Abuse: A Critical Review. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 54.0
    Childhood maltreatment is a severe stressor that can lead to the development of behaviour problems and affect brain structure and function. This review summarizes the current evidence for the effects of early childhood maltreatment on behavior, cognition and the brain in adults and children. Neuropsychological studies suggest an association between child abuse and deficits in IQ, memory, executive function and emotion discrimination. Structural neuroimaging studies provide evidence for deficits in brain volume, grey and white matter of several regions, most (...)
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  13. Richard J. Gelles (1991). Physical Violence, Child Abuse, and Child Homicide. Human Nature 2 (1):59-72.score: 54.0
    The study of child abuse and child homicide has been based on the often implicit assumption that there is a continuum of violence ranging from mild physical punishment to severe abuse and homicide. Empirical data supporting this assumption are sparse. Existing data can be shown, however, to support an assumption that there are distinct forms of violence, not a continuum. This paper reviews these data and discusses their implications for the study of violence, abuse, and homicide in (...)
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  14. Craig Hadley (2004). The Costs and Benefits of Kin. Human Nature 15 (4):377-395.score: 54.0
    In this paper data from a Tanzanian horticultural population are used to assess whether mother’s kin network size predicts several measures of children’s health and well-being, and whether any kin effects are modified by household socioeconomic status. This hypothesis is further tested with a questionnaire on maternal attitudes towards kin. Results show small associations between measures of maternal kin network size and child mortality and children’s growth performance. Together these results suggest that kin positively influence child health, but (...)
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  15. R. D. Orr & L. B. Genesen (1997). Requests for "Inappropriate" Treatment Based on Religious Beliefs. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (3):142-147.score: 48.0
    Requests by patients or their families for treatment which the patient's physician considers to be "inappropriate" are becoming more frequent than refusals of treatment which the physician considers appropriate. Such requests are often based on the patient's religious beliefs about the attributes of God (sovereignty, omnipotence), the attributes of persons (sanctity of life), or the individual's personal relationship with God (communication, commands, etc). We present four such cases and discuss some of the basic religious tenets of the three Abrahamic faith (...)
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  16. Peter Lewis (2007). Portrait of the Patient as a Young Man: An Exploration of the Use of Photographs in Hospital. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 4 (1):51-55.score: 48.0
    The display of personal photographs in hospital is a common practice that has yet to be rigorously examined. The photographs displayed are subject to interpretation by the viewer and may lead to misunderstandings or miscommunication if clarification of meaning is not sought. This paper explores a range of possible meanings that the display of photographs in hospital may hold, based on a case study of a 15 year old boy hospitalised with a life threatening illness. Further research is needed into (...)
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  17. Jacques N. Catudal (1999). Censorship, the Internet, and the Child Pornography Law of 1996: A Critique. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 1 (2):105-115.score: 42.0
    After describing the Child Pornography Prevention Act (CPPA) of 1996, I argue that the Act ought to be significantly amended. The central objections to CPPA are (1) that it is so broad in its main proscriptions as to violate the First Amendment rights of adults; (2) that it altogether fails to provide minors and their legal guardians with the privacy rights needed to combat the harms associated with certain classes of prurient material on the Internet; and, (3) that the (...)
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  18. Hazel Davies (2009). Ethics and Practice in Child Protection. Ethics and Social Welfare 3 (3):322-328.score: 42.0
    The author uses a case history to compare the approaches taken by social care teams in engaging with parents whose care of their children has been called into question. As organising secretary for Parent Aid, a voluntary support service for Essex families who had or were likely to become clients of Social Services, she drew up a list of five keys points that would improve working relations with parents in child protection and court situations and relates them to (...)
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  19. Bas Levering (2011). 'The Interests of the Child' Seen From the Child's Perspective: The Case of the Netherlands. Ethics and Education 6 (2):109-123.score: 42.0
    The Dutch government has decided to intervene in parents? role in bringing up their children by imposing compulsory parenting support. As such an intervention has to be legitimatised as being ?in the interests of the child?, it is important to take a closer look at this concept. First it is shown that it is not evident that the government has the right to intervene in this way. Within the ?child?parents?government? triangle three protective shells of self-determination can be (...)
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  20. Patrick Kermit (2010). Choosing for the Child with Cochlear Implants: A Note of Precaution. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (2):157-167.score: 42.0
    Recent contributions to discussions on paediatric cochlear implantation in Norway indicate two mutually exclusive doctrines prescribing the best course of post-operative support for a child with cochlear implants; bilingually with sign language and spoken language simultaneously or primarily monolingually with speech only. This conflict constitutes an ethical problem for parents responsible for choosing between one of the two alternatives. This article puts forth the precautionary principle as a possible solution to this problem. Although scientific uncertainty exists in the (...)
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  21. Kevin McGovern (2012). Continuing the Pregnancy When the Unborn Child has a Life-Limiting Condition. Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 17 (3):5.score: 42.0
    McGovern, Kevin When an unborn child is diagnosed with a life-limiting or life-threatening condition, many people now believe that the best solution is to immediately terminate the pregnancy. This article explores the option of continuing the pregnancy with the support of perinatal palliative care. Many parents have found this alternative fits better with their values, and better honours both their unborn child and their situation as the loving parents of this child. The article also explores the (...)
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  22. Roberto Bottini & Daniel Casasanto (2013). Space and Time in the Child's Mind: Metaphoric or ATOMic? Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 42.0
    Space and time are intimately linked in the human mind, but different theories make different predictions about the nature of this relationship. Metaphor Theory (MT) predicts an asymmetric relationship between space and time. By contrast, A Theory of Magnitude (ATOM) does not predict any cross-dimensional asymmetry, since according to ATOM spatial and temporal extents are represented by a common neural metric for analog magnitude. To date, experiments designed to contrast these theories support MT over ATOM, in adults and children. (...)
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  23. E. Hemming & J. Akhurst (2009). Mothers' Life-Worlds in a Developing Context When a Child has Special Needs. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 9 (1).score: 42.0
    This South African study investigates the lived experiences of a group of isiZulu mothers of children diagnosed with multiple disabilities. Data collection from regular focus group discussions proceeded with the assistance of a translator skilled in working in isiZulu and English. The phenomenological approach employed revealed the mothers' philosophical acceptance of their child's disability. Issues of concern to the women that emerged include the effects of the child's disability on their lives, the treatment options for their children, and (...)
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  24. Darcia Narvaez (2012). Moral Neuroeducation From Early Life Through the Lifespan. Neuroethics 5 (2):145-157.score: 36.0
    Personality and social development begins before birth in the communication among mother, child and environment, during sensitive periods when the child’s brain and body are plastic and epigenetically co-constructed. Triune ethics theory postulates three evolved, neurobiologically-based ethics fostered by early life experience. The security ethic is self-protective. The engagement ethic is relationally attuned. The imagination ethic can abstract from the present moment and imagine alternatives. Climates and cultures can foster one or another ethic. Ancestral environments were more conducive (...)
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  25. Santhy Dewi Karanina & P. Tommy Y. S. Suyasa (2010). Hubungan Persepsi Terhadap Dukungan Suami Dan Penyesuaian Diri Istri Pada Kehamilan Anak Pertama. Phronesis 7 (1).score: 36.0
    : The aim of this research is not to know the relationship between support from husband to their wife at the first parturition and self adjustment. Subjects in this research are 100 pregnant mothers of first child which live in Tangerang. The result is strong positive correlation between support from husband and self adjustment at the first pregnancy.  .
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  26. Jessica M. Bagdonis, C. Clare Hinrichs & Kai A. Schafft (2009). The Emergence and Framing of Farm-to-School Initiatives: Civic Engagement, Health and Local Agriculture. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 26 (1-2):107-119.score: 36.0
    Interest in and initiation of farm-to-school (FTS) programs have increased in recent years, spurred on by converging public concerns about child obesity trends and risks associated with industrialization and distancing in the modern food system. A civic agriculture framework that more specifically considers civic engagement and problem solving offers insights about variations in the development and prospects for FTS programs. Drawing on comparative case studies of two emerging FTS initiatives in Pennsylvania—one in a rural setting and one in an (...)
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  27. Louise Bøttcher (2010). An Eye for Possibilities in the Development of Children with Cerebral Palsy: Neurobiology and Neuropsychology in a Cultural-Historical Dynamic Understanding. Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 12 (1):3-23.score: 36.0
    Taking children with Cerebral Palsy (CP) as an example, the article seeks an understanding of children with disabilities that connects neuropsychological theories of neural development with the situated cognition perspective and the child as an active participant in its social practices. The early brain lesion of CP is reconceptualised as a neurobiological constraint that exists in the relations between the neural, cognitive and social levels. Through a multi-method study of two children with CP, it is analysed how neurobiological constraints (...)
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  28. Brooke A. Scelza (2011). The Place of Proximity. Human Nature 22 (1-2):108-127.score: 36.0
    The mother–adult daughter relationship has been highlighted in both the social sciences and the public health literature as an important facet of social support networks, particularly as they pertain to maternal and child health. Evolutionary anthropologists also have shown positive associations between support from maternal grandmothers and various outcomes related to reproductive success; however, many of these studies rely on proximity as a surrogate measure of support. Here I present data from the Puerto Rican Maternal and (...)
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  29. Ezio Di Nucci (forthcoming). Fathers and Abortion. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy:jhu021.score: 30.0
    I argue that it is possible for prospective mothers to wrong prospective fathers by bearing their child; and that lifting paternal liability for child support does not correct the wrong inflicted to fathers. It is therefore sometimes wrong for prospective mothers to bear a child, or so I argue here. I show that my argument for considering the legitimate interests of prospective fathers is not a unique exception to an obvious right to procreate. It is, rather, (...)
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  30. H. Draper (2007). Paternity Fraud and Compensation for Misattributed Paternity. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (8):475-480.score: 30.0
    Next SectionClaims for reimbursement of child support, the reversal of property settlements and compensation can arise when misattributed paternity is discovered. The ethical justifications for such claims seem to be related to the financial cost of bringing up children, the absence of choice about taking on these expenses, the hard work involved in child rearing, the emotional attachments that are formed with children, the obligation of women to make truthful claims about paternity, and the deception involved in (...)
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  31. Beverly I. Strassmann & Nikhil T. Kurapati (2010). Are Humans Cooperative Breeders?: Most Studies of Natural Fertility Populations Do Not Support the Grandmother Hypothesis. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (1):35-39.score: 30.0
    In discussing the effects of grandparents on child survival in natural fertility populations, Coall & Hertwig (C&H) rely extensively on the review by Sear and Mace (2008). We conducted a more detailed summary of the same literature and found that the evidence in favor of beneficial associations between grandparenting and child survival is generally weak or absent. The present state of the data on human alloparenting supports a more restricted use of the term Human stem family situations with (...)
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  32. Bernard G. Prusak (2011). Breaking the Bond. Social Theory and Practice 37 (2):311-332.score: 30.0
    Contemporary philosophy offers two main accounts of how parental obligations are acquired: the causal and the voluntarist account. Elizabeth Brake's provocative paper "Fatherhood and Child Support: Do Men Have a Right to Choose?" seeks to clear the way for the voluntarist account by focusing on the relevance of abortion rights to parental obligations. The present paper is concerned with rebutting Brake's argument that, if a woman does not acquire parental obligations to an unborn child just by having (...)
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  33. Paul R. Johnson (1981). Selective Nontreatment and Spina Bifida: A Case Study in Ethical Theory and Application. [REVIEW] Bioethics Quarterly 3 (2):91-111.score: 30.0
    Defective newborn children are to be considered human persons. Thus, primary duty in proxy consent is to act with the infant's best interest in mind. This duty may at times override the otherwise prima facie right to life, but only under restricted circumstances. Refinements of McCormick's “relational potential” criteria and of ordinary-extraordinary means analysis prove useful in such decisions. Utilitarian considerations of social consequences have impact but can be kept subsidiary. The importance for decision making of available child (...) services is considered. Spina bifida is used throughout as an example of issues discussed. (shrink)
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  34. Bernard G. Prusak (2013). Parental Obligations and Bioethics: The Duties of a Creator. Routledge.score: 30.0
    This book examines the question of what parental obligations procreators incur by bringing children into being. Prusak argues that parents, as procreators, have obligations regarding future children that constrain the liberty of would-be parents to do as they wish. Moreover, these obligations go beyond simply respecting a child’s rights. He addresses in turn the ethics of adoption, child support, gamete donation, surrogacy, prenatal genetic enhancement, and public responsibility for children.
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  35. Sally Sheldon (2001). Unmarried Fathers and Parental Responsibility: A Case for Reform? [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 9 (2):93-118.score: 30.0
    Following a Consultation exercise conducted by the Lord Chancellor's Department, the U.K. Government has announced its intention to amend the Children Act 1989 so that the unmarried father who jointly registers the birth with the mother will acquire parental responsibility automatically. In this paper, I draw on the responses made to the L.C.D. Consultation, in order critically to evaluate the arguments for and against reform. A poverty of relevant empirical research makes it impossible to reach a properly informed view on (...)
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  36. Jami L. Anderson (2013). A Dash of Autism. In Jami L. Anderson Simon Cushing (ed.), The Philosophy of Autism. Rowman & Littlefield.score: 24.0
    In this chapter, I describe my “post-diagnosis” experiences as the parent of an autistic child, those years in which I tried, but failed, to make sense of the overwhelming and often nonsensical information I received about autism. I argue that immediately after being given an autism diagnosis, parents are pressured into making what amounts to a life-long commitment to a therapy program that (they are told) will not only dramatically change their child, but their family’s financial situation and (...)
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  37. Lisa L. Fuller (2011). Knowing Their Own Good: Preferences & Liberty in Global Ethics. In Thom Brooks (ed.), New Waves in Ethics. Palgrave MacMillan. 210--230.score: 24.0
    Citizens of liberal, affluent societies are regularly encouraged to support reforms meant to improve conditions for badly-off people in the developing world. Our economic and political support is solicited for causes such as: banning child labor, implementing universal primary education, closing down sweatshops and brothels, etc. But what if the relevant populations or individuals in the developing world do not support these particular reforms or aid programs? What if they would strongly prefer other reforms and programs, (...)
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  38. Jesse J. Prinz (2007). The Emotional Construction of Morals. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Jesse Prinz argues that recent work in philosophy, neuroscience, and anthropology supports two radical hypotheses about the nature of morality: moral values are based on emotional responses, and these emotional responses are inculcated by culture, not hard-wired through natural selection. In the first half of the book, Jesse Prinz defends the hypothesis that morality has an emotional foundation. Evidence from brain imaging, social psychology, and psychopathology suggest that, when we judge something to be right or wrong, we are merely expressing (...)
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  39. Jakob Elster (2011). Procreative Beneficence – Cui Bono? Bioethics 25 (9):482-488.score: 24.0
    Recently, Julian Savulescu and Guy Kahane have defended the Principle of Procreative Beneficence (PB), according to which prospective parents ought to select children with the view that their future child has ‘the best chance of the best life’. I argue that the arguments Savulescu and Kahane adduce in favour of PB equally well support what I call the Principle of General Procreative Beneficence (GPB). GPB states that couples ought to select children in view of maximizing the overall expected (...)
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  40. M. M. Tieu (2009). Altruistic Surrogacy: The Necessary Objectification of Surrogate Mothers. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (3):171-175.score: 24.0
    Next SectionOne of the major concerns about surrogacy is the potential harm that may be inflicted upon the surrogate mother and the child after relinquishment. Even if one were to take the liberal view that surrogacy should be presumptively allowed on the basis of autonomy and/or compassion, evidence of harm must be taken seriously. In this paper I review the evidence from psychological studies on the effect that relinquishing a child has on the surrogate mother and while it (...)
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  41. Liane Young, Shaun Nichols & Rebecca Saxe (2010). Investigating the Neural and Cognitive Basis of Moral Luck. [REVIEW] Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (3):333-349.score: 24.0
    Moral judgments, we expect, ought not to depend on luck. A person should be blamed only for actions and outcomes that were under the person’s control. Yet often, moral judgments appear to be influenced by luck. A father who leaves his child by the bath, after telling his child to stay put and believing that he will stay put, is judged to be morally blameworthy if the child drowns (an unlucky outcome), but not if his child (...)
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  42. Carolyn McLeod & Andrew Botterell (forthcoming). Not For the Faint of Heart: Assessing the Status Quo on Adoption and Parental Licensing. In Francoise Baylis & Carolyn McLeod (eds.), Family Making: Contemporary Ethical Challenges. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    The process of adopting a child is “not for the faint of heart.” This is what we were told the first time we, as a couple, began this process. Part of the challenge lies in fulfilling the licensing requirements for adoption, which, beyond the usual home study, can include mandatory participation in parenting classes. The question naturally arises for many people who are subjected to these requirements whether they are morally justified. We tackle this question in this paper. In (...)
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  43. David Papineau (2006). The Cultural Origins of Cognitive Adaptations. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 80 (56):24-.score: 24.0
    According to an influential view in contemporary cognitive science, many human cognitive capacities are innate. The primary support for this view comes from ‘poverty of stimulus’ arguments. In general outline, such arguments contrast the meagre informational input to cognitive development with its rich informational output. Consider the ease with which humans acquire languages, become facile at attributing psychological states (‘folk psychology’), gain knowledge of biological kinds (‘folk biology’), or come to understand basic physical processes (‘folk physics’). In all these (...)
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  44. Christopher Bartel (2012). Resolving the Gamer's Dilemma. Ethics and Information Technology 14 (1):11-16.score: 24.0
    Morgan Luck raises a potentially troubling problem for gamers who enjoy video games that allow the player to commit acts of virtual murder. The problem simply is that the arguments typically advanced to defend virtual murder in video games would appear to also support video games that allowed gamers to commit acts of virtual paedophilia. Luck’s arguments are persuasive, however, there is one line of argument that he does not consider, which may provide the relevant distinction: as virtual paedophilia (...)
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  45. Peter Carruthers (2002). The Roots of Scientific Reasoning: Infancy, Modularity, and the Art of Tracking. In Peter Carruthers, Stephen P. Stich & Michael Siegal (eds.), [Book Chapter]. Cambridge University Press. 73--95.score: 24.0
    This chapter examines the extent to which there are continuities between the cognitive processes and epistemic practices engaged in by human hunter-gatherers, on the one hand, and those which are distinctive of science, on the other. It deploys anthropological evidence against any form of 'no-continuity' view, drawing especially on the cognitive skills involved in the art of tracking. It also argues against the 'child-as-scientist' accounts put forward by some developmental psychologists, which imply that scientific thinking is present in early (...)
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  46. Alexander A. Kon (2007). Neonatal Euthanasia is Unsupportable: The Groningen Protocol Should Be Abandoned. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 28 (5):453-463.score: 24.0
    The growing support for voluntary active euthanasia (VAE) is evident in the recently approved Dutch Law on Termination of Life on Request. Indeed, the debate over legalized VAE has increased in European countries, the United States, and many other nations over the last several years. The proponents of VAE argue that when a patient judges that the burdens of living outweigh the benefits, euthanasia can be justified. If some adults suffer to such an extent that VAE is justified, then (...)
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  47. Debra Satz (2010). Why Some Things Should Not Be for Sale: The Moral Limits of Markets. OUP USA.score: 24.0
    What's wrong with markets in everything? Markets today are widely recognized as the most efficient way in general to organize production and distribution in a complex economy. And with the collapse of communism and rise of globalization, it's no surprise that markets and the political theories supporting them have seen a considerable resurgence. For many, markets are an all-purpose remedy for the deadening effects of bureaucracy and state control. But what about those markets we might label noxious-markets in addictive drugs, (...)
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  48. Crispin Wright (1982). Strict Finitism. Synthese 51 (2):203 - 282.score: 24.0
    Dummett's objections to the coherence of the strict finitist philosophy of mathematics are thus, at the present time at least, ill-taken. We have so far no definitive treatment of Sorites paradoxes; so no conclusive ground for dismissing Dummett's response — the response of simply writing off a large class of familiar, confidently handled expressions as semantically incoherent. I believe that cannot be the right response, if only because it threatens to open an unacceptable gulf between the insight into his own (...)
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  49. J. Brierley, J. Linthicum & A. Petros (2013). Should Religious Beliefs Be Allowed to Stonewall a Secular Approach to Withdrawing and Withholding Treatment in Children? Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (9):573-577.score: 24.0
    Religion is an important element of end-of-life care on the paediatric intensive care unit with religious belief providing support for many families and for some staff. However, religious claims used by families to challenge cessation of aggressive therapies considered futile and burdensome by a wide range of medical and lay people can cause considerable problems and be very difficult to resolve. While it is vital to support families in such difficult times, we are increasingly concerned that deeply held (...)
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  50. Victoria Mcgeer (2002). Developing Trust. Philosophical Explorations 5 (1):21 – 38.score: 24.0
    This paper examines developing trust in two related senses: (1) rationally overcoming distrust, and (2) developing a mature capacity for trusting/distrusting. In focussing exclusively on the first problem, traditional philosophical discussions fail to address how an evidence- based paradigm of rationality is easily co-opted by (immature) agents in support of irrational distrust (or trust) - a manifestation of the second problem. Well-regulated trust requires developing a capacity to tolerate the uncertainties that chracterise relationships among fully autonomous self-directed agents. Early (...)
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