Search results for 'child support' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Elizabeth Brake (2005). Fatherhood and Child Support: Do Men Have a Right to Choose? Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (1):55–73.score: 75.0
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Patricia Major (2010). Book Review of Time to Care: Redesigning Child Care to Promote Education, Support Families, and Build Communities. [REVIEW] Educational Studies 38 (1):72-76.score: 48.0
    (2005). BOOK REVIEW of Time to Care: Redesigning Child Care to Promote Education, Support Families, and Build Communities. Educational Studies: Vol. 38, No. 1, pp. 72-76.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Rebecca Boden & Mary Childs (1996). Paying for Procreation: Child Support Arrangements in the UK. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 4 (2):131-157.score: 46.0
    Under the present system it is a very good thing to remain happily married, I have to tell you!
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Cindy Elmore (2010). On and On, Over and Over: The Gender War in Child Support Enforcement Court. Feminist Studies 36 (2):397-403.score: 45.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Inga Kudinavičiūtė-Michailovienė & Jolanta Vėgelienė (2012). Child Maintenance: Several Topical Theoretical and Practical Aspects. Jurisprudence 19 (1):209-229.score: 45.0
    The Constitution of the Republic of Lithuania1 determines that both parents have to maintain their minors, while the state has to establish conditions under which parents would be able to do their duties, i.e. undertakes responsibility to maintain the children who lack the maintenance from their parents. Latter obligations are concretized in the Civil Code of the Republic of Lithuania2 (3.192–3.204 art.). It also anticipates the principles under which the child’s maintenance should be provided, its forms, size criteria and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Francie Lund (2012). 18 Children, Citizenship and Child Support: The Child Support Grant in Post-Apartheid South Africa. Proceedings of the British Academy 182:475.score: 45.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Linas Žalnieriūnas & Tomas Girdenis (2013). Problematic Qualification Aspects of the Avoidance to Maintain a Child and Alternative Ways of Child Maintenance. Jurisprudence 20 (2):707-724.score: 30.0
    The article analyzes one of the fundamental rights – the right to maintenance, which proper implementation ensures normal development of the child. This right matches with the duty of parents to maintain their minor children. Paragraph 6 of Article 38 of the Constitution of the Republic of Lithuania states that parents have a duty to educate their children to be honest people and loyal citizens, supporting them until adulthood. The obligation to maintain children is established in the first 3.192 (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Andrea Beetz, Henri Julius, Dennis Turner & Kurt Kotrschal (2012). Effects of Social Support by a Dog on Stress Modulation in Male Children with Insecure Attachment. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 27.0
    Up to 90% of children with special education needs and about 40% of children in the general population show insecure or disorganized attachment patterns, which are linked to a diminished ability to use social support by others for the regulation of stress. The aim of the study was to investigate if children with insecure-avoidant/disorganized attachment can profit more from social support by a dog compared to a friendly human during a stressful task. We investigated 47 male children (age (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Richard J. Gelles (1991). Physical Violence, Child Abuse, and Child Homicide. Human Nature 2 (1):59-72.score: 27.0
    The study of child abuse and child homicide has been based on the often implicit assumption that there is a continuum of violence ranging from mild physical punishment to severe abuse and homicide. Empirical data supporting this assumption are sparse. Existing data can be shown, however, to support an assumption that there are distinct forms of violence, not a continuum. This paper reviews these data and discusses their implications for the study of violence, abuse, and homicide in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Linda J. Graham (2008). Child-Rearing Inc.: On the Perils of Political Paralysis Down Under. Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (6):739-746.score: 27.0
    In his 2007 PESA keynote address, Paul Smeyers discussed the increasing regulation of child-rearing through government intervention and the generation of 'experts', citing particular examples from Europe where cases of childhood obesity and parental neglect have stirred public opinion and political debate. In his paper ('Child-Rearing: On government intervention and the discourse of experts', this issue), Smeyers touches on a number of tensions before concluding that child-rearing qualifies as a practice in which liberal governments should be reluctant (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Craig Hadley (2004). The Costs and Benefits of Kin. Human Nature 15 (4):377-395.score: 27.0
    In this paper data from a Tanzanian horticultural population are used to assess whether mother’s kin network size predicts several measures of children’s health and well-being, and whether any kin effects are modified by household socioeconomic status. This hypothesis is further tested with a questionnaire on maternal attitudes towards kin. Results show small associations between measures of maternal kin network size and child mortality and children’s growth performance. Together these results suggest that kin positively influence child health, but (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Heledd Hart & Katya Rubia (2012). Neuroimaging of Child Abuse: A Critical Review. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 27.0
    Childhood maltreatment is a severe stressor that can lead to the development of behaviour problems and affect brain structure and function. This review summarizes the current evidence for the effects of early childhood maltreatment on behavior, cognition and the brain in adults and children. Neuropsychological studies suggest an association between child abuse and deficits in IQ, memory, executive function and emotion discrimination. Structural neuroimaging studies provide evidence for deficits in brain volume, grey and white matter of several regions, most (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Daniel Yurovsky, Chen Yu & Linda B. Smith (2012). Statistical Speech Segmentation and Word Learning in Parallel: Scaffolding From Child-Directed Speech. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 27.0
    In order to acquire their native languages, children must learn richly structured systems with regularities at multiple levels. While structure at different levels could be learned serially, e.g. speech segmentation coming before word-object mapping, redundancies across levels make parallel learning more efficient. For instance, a series of syllables is likely to be a word not only because of high transitional probabilities, but also because of a consistently co-occurring object. But additional statistics require additional processing, and thus might not be useful (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. R. D. Orr & L. B. Genesen (1997). Requests for "Inappropriate" Treatment Based on Religious Beliefs. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (3):142-147.score: 24.0
    Requests by patients or their families for treatment which the patient's physician considers to be "inappropriate" are becoming more frequent than refusals of treatment which the physician considers appropriate. Such requests are often based on the patient's religious beliefs about the attributes of God (sovereignty, omnipotence), the attributes of persons (sanctity of life), or the individual's personal relationship with God (communication, commands, etc). We present four such cases and discuss some of the basic religious tenets of the three Abrahamic faith (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Peter Lewis (2007). Portrait of the Patient as a Young Man: An Exploration of the Use of Photographs in Hospital. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 4 (1):51-55.score: 24.0
    The display of personal photographs in hospital is a common practice that has yet to be rigorously examined. The photographs displayed are subject to interpretation by the viewer and may lead to misunderstandings or miscommunication if clarification of meaning is not sought. This paper explores a range of possible meanings that the display of photographs in hospital may hold, based on a case study of a 15 year old boy hospitalised with a life threatening illness. Further research is needed into (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Jacques N. Catudal (1999). Censorship, the Internet, and the Child Pornography Law of 1996: A Critique. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 1 (2):105-115.score: 21.0
    After describing the Child Pornography Prevention Act (CPPA) of 1996, I argue that the Act ought to be significantly amended. The central objections to CPPA are (1) that it is so broad in its main proscriptions as to violate the First Amendment rights of adults; (2) that it altogether fails to provide minors and their legal guardians with the privacy rights needed to combat the harms associated with certain classes of prurient material on the Internet; and, (3) that the (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Hazel Davies (2009). Ethics and Practice in Child Protection. Ethics and Social Welfare 3 (3):322-328.score: 21.0
    The author uses a case history to compare the approaches taken by social care teams in engaging with parents whose care of their children has been called into question. As organising secretary for Parent Aid, a voluntary support service for Essex families who had or were likely to become clients of Social Services, she drew up a list of five keys points that would improve working relations with parents in child protection and court situations and relates them to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Bas Levering (2011). 'The Interests of the Child' Seen From the Child's Perspective: The Case of the Netherlands. Ethics and Education 6 (2):109-123.score: 21.0
    The Dutch government has decided to intervene in parents? role in bringing up their children by imposing compulsory parenting support. As such an intervention has to be legitimatised as being ?in the interests of the child?, it is important to take a closer look at this concept. First it is shown that it is not evident that the government has the right to intervene in this way. Within the ?child?parents?government? triangle three protective shells of self-determination can be (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Roberto Bottini & Daniel Casasanto (2013). Space and Time in the Child's Mind: Metaphoric or ATOMic? Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 21.0
    Space and time are intimately linked in the human mind, but different theories make different predictions about the nature of this relationship. Metaphor Theory (MT) predicts an asymmetric relationship between space and time. By contrast, A Theory of Magnitude (ATOM) does not predict any cross-dimensional asymmetry, since according to ATOM spatial and temporal extents are represented by a common neural metric for analog magnitude. To date, experiments designed to contrast these theories support MT over ATOM, in adults and children. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. E. Hemming & J. Akhurst (2009). Mothers' Life-Worlds in a Developing Context When a Child has Special Needs. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 9 (1).score: 21.0
    This South African study investigates the lived experiences of a group of isiZulu mothers of children diagnosed with multiple disabilities. Data collection from regular focus group discussions proceeded with the assistance of a translator skilled in working in isiZulu and English. The phenomenological approach employed revealed the mothers' philosophical acceptance of their child's disability. Issues of concern to the women that emerged include the effects of the child's disability on their lives, the treatment options for their children, and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Patrick Kermit (2010). Choosing for the Child with Cochlear Implants: A Note of Precaution. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (2):157-167.score: 21.0
    Recent contributions to discussions on paediatric cochlear implantation in Norway indicate two mutually exclusive doctrines prescribing the best course of post-operative support for a child with cochlear implants; bilingually with sign language and spoken language simultaneously or primarily monolingually with speech only. This conflict constitutes an ethical problem for parents responsible for choosing between one of the two alternatives. This article puts forth the precautionary principle as a possible solution to this problem. Although scientific uncertainty exists in the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Kevin McGovern (2012). Continuing the Pregnancy When the Unborn Child has a Life-Limiting Condition. Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 17 (3):5.score: 21.0
    McGovern, Kevin When an unborn child is diagnosed with a life-limiting or life-threatening condition, many people now believe that the best solution is to immediately terminate the pregnancy. This article explores the option of continuing the pregnancy with the support of perinatal palliative care. Many parents have found this alternative fits better with their values, and better honours both their unborn child and their situation as the loving parents of this child. The article also explores the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Chris Tucker (2009). Evidential Support, Reliability, and Hume's Problem of Induction. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 90 (4):503-519.score: 18.0
    Necessity holds that, if a proposition A supports another B, then it must support B. John Greco contends that one can resolve Hume's Problem of Induction only if she rejects Necessity in favor of reliabilism. If Greco's contention is correct, we would have good reason to reject Necessity and endorse reliabilism about inferential justification. Unfortunately, Greco's contention is mistaken. I argue that there is a plausible reply to Hume's Problem that both endorses Necessity and is at least as good (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Michael McFall (2009). Licensing Parents: Family, State, and Child Maltreatment. Rowman and Littlefield.score: 18.0
    In Licensing Parents, Michael McFall argues that political structures, economics, education, racism, and sexism are secondary in importance to the inequality caused by families, and that the family plays the primary role in a child's acquisition of a sense of justice. He demonstrates that examination of the family is necessary in political philosophy and that informal structures (families) and considerations (character formation) must be taken seriously. McFall advocates a threshold that should be accepted by all political philosophers: children should (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Kieran Mathieson (2007). Towards a Design Science of Ethical Decision Support. Journal of Business Ethics 76 (3):269 - 292.score: 18.0
    Ethical decision making involves complex emotional, cognitive, social, and philosophical challenges. Even if someone wants to be ethical, he or she may not have clearly articulated what that means, or know how to go about making a decision consistent with his or her values. Information technology may be able to help. A decision support system could offer individuals and groups some guidance, assisting them in making a decision that reflects their underlying values. The first step towards a design science (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Nicholas Shackel (2008). Coherentism and the Symmetry of Epistemic Support. Analysis 68 (299):226–234.score: 18.0
    In this paper I prove that holistic coherentism is logically equivalent to the conjunction of symmetry and quasi-transitivity of epistemic support and a condition on justified beliefs. On the way I defend Tom Stoneham from a criticism made by Darrell Rowbottom and prove a premiss of Stoneham’s argument to be an entailment of coherentism.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Timo Kajamies (2009). A Quintet, a Quartet, a Trio, a Duo? The Epistemic Regress Problem, Evidential Support, and Skepticism. Philosophia 37 (3):525-534.score: 18.0
    In his topical article, Andrew Cling claims that the best extant formulation of the so-called epistemic regress problem rests on five assumptions that are too strong. Cling offers an improved version that rests on a different set of three core epistemic assumptions, each of which he argues for. Despite of owing a great deal to Cling’s ideas, I argue that the epistemic regress problem surfaces from more fundamental assumptions than those offered by Cling. There are ultimately two core assumptions—in fact (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Matthias Kaiser, Kate Millar, Erik Thorstensen & Sandy Tomkins (2007). Developing the Ethical Matrix as a Decision Support Framework: GM Fish as a Case Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 20 (1):65-80.score: 18.0
    The Ethical Matrix was developed to help decision-makers explore the ethical issues raised by agri-food biotechnologies. Over the decade since its inception the Ethical Matrix has been used by a number of organizations and the philosophical basis of the framework has been discussed and analyzed extensively. The role of tools such as the Ethical Matrix in public policy decision-making has received increasing attention. In order to further develop the methodological aspects of the Ethical Matrix method, work was carried out to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Carol van Nijnatten (2010). Children's Agency, Children's Welfare: A Dialogical Approach to Child Development, Policy and Practice. Policy Press.score: 18.0
    Contributing to current debates about child welfare and child protection, this book provides a holistic view of how children develop agency, combining social, ...
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Debra Z. Basil, Mary S. Runte, M. Easwaramoorthy & Cathy Barr (2009). Company Support for Employee Volunteering: A National Survey of Companies in Canada. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (2):387 - 398.score: 18.0
    Company support for employee volunteerism (CSEV) benefits companies, employees, and society while helping companies meet the expectations of corporate social responsibility (CSR). A nationally representative telephone survey of 990 Canadian companies examined CSEV through the lens of Porter and Kramer's (2006, 'Strategy and society: the link between competitive advantage and corporate social responsibility', Harvard Business Review, 78-92.) CSR model. The results demonstrated that Canadian companies passively support employee volunteerism in a variety of ways, such as allowing employees to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Tomoji Shogenji (2013). Coherence of the Contents and the Transmission of Probabilistic Support. Synthese 190 (13):2525-2545.score: 18.0
    This paper examines how coherence of the contents of evidence affects the transmission of probabilistic support from the evidence to the hypothesis. It is argued that coherence of the contents in the sense of the ratio of the positive intersection reduces the transmission of probabilistic support, though this negative impact of coherence may be offset by other aspects of the relations among the contents. It is argued further that there is no broader conception of coherence whose impact on (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Ans Kolk & Rob van Tuldere (2002). Child Labor and Multinational Conduct: A Comparison of International Business Andstakeholder Codes. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 36 (3):291-301.score: 18.0
    Increasing attention to the issue of child labor has been reflected in codes of conduct that emerged in the past decade in particular. This paper examines the way in which multinationals, business associations, governmental and non-governmental organizations deal with child labor in their codes. With a standardized framework, it analyzes 55 codes drawn up by these different actors to influence firms external, societal behavior. The exploratory study helps to identify the main issues related to child labor and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. William Roche (2012). A Weaker Condition for Transitivity in Probabilistic Support. European Journal for Philosophy of Science 2 (1):111-118.score: 18.0
    Probabilistic support is not transitive. There are cases in which x probabilistically supports y , i.e., Pr( y | x ) > Pr( y ), y , in turn, probabilistically supports z , and yet it is not the case that x probabilistically supports z . Tomoji Shogenji, though, establishes a condition for transitivity in probabilistic support, that is, a condition such that, for any x , y , and z , if Pr( y | x ) > (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Darcia Narvaez (2012). Moral Neuroeducation From Early Life Through the Lifespan. Neuroethics 5 (2):145-157.score: 18.0
    Personality and social development begins before birth in the communication among mother, child and environment, during sensitive periods when the child’s brain and body are plastic and epigenetically co-constructed. Triune ethics theory postulates three evolved, neurobiologically-based ethics fostered by early life experience. The security ethic is self-protective. The engagement ethic is relationally attuned. The imagination ethic can abstract from the present moment and imagine alternatives. Climates and cultures can foster one or another ethic. Ancestral environments were more conducive (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Stefan Ramaekers & Paul Smeyers (2008). Child Rearing: Passivity and Being Able to Go On. Wittgenstein on Shared Practices and Seeing Aspects. Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (5):638-651.score: 18.0
    It is not uncommon to hear parents say in discussions they have with their children 'Look at it this way'. And called upon for their advice, counsellors too say something to adults with the significance of 'Try to see it like this'. The change of someone's perspective in the context of child rearing is the focus of this paper. Our interest in this lies not so much in giving an answer to the practical problems that are at stake, but (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Bert Molewijk, Dick Kleinlugtenbelt, Scott Pugh & Guy Widdershoven (2011). Emotions and Clinical Ethics Support. A Moral Inquiry Into Emotions in Moral Case Deliberation. HEC Forum 23 (4):257-268.score: 18.0
    Emotions play an important part in moral life. Within clinical ethics support (CES), one should take into account the crucial role of emotions in moral cases in clinical practice. In this paper, we present an Aristotelian approach to emotions. We argue that CES can help participants deal with emotions by fostering a joint process of investigation of the role of emotions in a case. This investigation goes beyond empathy with and moral judgment of the emotions of the case presenter. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Paul Smeyers (2008). Child-Rearing: On Government Intervention and the Discourse of Experts. Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (6):719-738.score: 18.0
    For Kant, education was understood as the 'means' to become human—and that is to say, rational. For Rousseau by contrast, and the many child-centred educators that followed him, the adult world, far from representing reason, is essentially corrupt and given over to the superficialities of worldly vanity. On this view, the child, as a product of nature, is essentially good and will learn all she needs to know from experience. Both positions have their own problems, but beyond this (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Keith Bauer (2004). Covert Video Surveillance of Parents Suspected of Child Abuse: The British Experience and Alternative Approaches. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (4):311-327.score: 18.0
    One million cases of child maltreatment and twelve hundred child deaths due to abuse and neglect occur per year. But since many cases of abuse and neglect remain either unreported or unsubstantiated due to insufficient evidence, the number of children who are abused, neglected, and killed at the hands of family caregivers is probably higher. One approach to combat child abuse in the U.K. has been the employment of hospital-based covert video surveillance (CVS) to monitor parents suspected (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Giles Oatley, Brian Ewart & John Zeleznikow (2006). Decision Support Systems for Police: Lessons From the Application of Data Mining Techniques to “Soft” Forensic Evidence. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 14 (1-2):35-100.score: 18.0
    The paper sets out the challenges facing the Police in respect of the detection and prevention of the volume crime of burglary. A discussion of data mining and decision support technologies that have the potential to address these issues is undertaken and illustrated with reference the authors’ work with three Police Services. The focus is upon the use of “soft” forensic evidence which refers to modus operandi and the temporal and geographical features of the crime, rather than “hard” evidence (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Kristine Bærøe & Ole Frithjof Norheim (2011). Mapping Out Structural Features in Clinical Care Calling for Ethical Sensitivity: A Theoretical Approach to Promote Ethical Competence in Healthcare Personnel and Clinical Ethical Support Services (Cess). Bioethics 25 (7):394-402.score: 18.0
    Clinical ethical support services (CESS) represent a multifaceted field of aims, consultancy models, and methodologies. Nevertheless, the overall aim of CESS can be summed up as contributing to healthcare of high ethical standards by improving ethically competent decision-making in clinical healthcare. In order to support clinical care adequately, CESS must pay systematic attention to all real-life ethical issues, including those which do not fall within the ‘favourite’ ethical issues of the day. In this paper we attempt to capture (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. John Harris (2000). The Welfare of the Child. Health Care Analysis 8 (1):27-34.score: 18.0
    The interests or welfare of the child are rightly central to anydiscussion of the ethics of reproduction. The problematic nature of thislegitimate concern is seldom, if ever, noticed or if it is, it ismisunderstood. A prominent example of this sort of misunderstandingoccurs in the Department of Health's recent and important `SurrogacyReview' chaired by Margaret Brazier (The Brazier Report) and thesame misunderstanding makes nonsense of at least one provision of theHuman Fertilization and Embryology Act 1990. (The HFE Act).This paper explores (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. William Roche (2012). Transitivity and Intransitivity in Evidential Support: Some Further Results. Review of Symbolic Logic 5 (2):259-268.score: 18.0
    Igor Douven establishes several new intransitivity results concerning evidential support. I add to Douven’s very instructive discussion by establishing two further intransitivity results and a transitivity result.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Wilma C. Rossi, William Reynolds & Robert M. Nelson (2003). Child Assent and Parental Permission in Pediatric Research. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 24 (2):131-148.score: 18.0
    Since children are considered incapable ofgiving informed consent to participate inresearch, regulations require that bothparental permission and the assent of thepotential child subject be obtained. Assent andpermission are uniquely bound together, eachserving a different purpose. Parentalpermission protects the child from assumingunreasonable risks. Assent demonstrates respectfor the child and his developing autonomy. Inorder to give meaningful assent, the child mustunderstand that procedures will be performed,voluntarily choose to undergo the procedures,and communicate this choice. Understanding theelements of informed consent (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Christina Schües & Christoph Rehmann-Sutter (2013). The Well- and Unwell-Being of a Child. Topoi 32 (2):197-205.score: 18.0
    The concept of the ‘well-being of the child’ (like the ‘child’s welfare’ and ‘best interests of the child’) has remained underdetermined in legal and ethical texts on the needs and rights of children. As a hypothetical construct that draws attention to the child’s long-term welfare, the well-being of the child is a broader concept than autonomy and happiness. This paper clarifies some conceptual issues of the well-being of the child from a philosophical point of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Barbara Stumper, Colin Bannard, Elena Lieven & Michael Tomasello (2011). “Frequent Frames” in German Child-Directed Speech: A Limited Cue to Grammatical Categories. Cognitive Science 35 (6):1190-1205.score: 18.0
    Mintz (2003) found that in English child-directed speech, frequently occurring frames formed by linking the preceding (A) and succeeding (B) word (A_x_B) could accurately predict the syntactic category of the intervening word (x). This has been successfully extended to French (Chemla, Mintz, Bernal, & Christophe, 2009). In this paper, we show that, as for Dutch (Erkelens, 2009), frequent frames in German do not enable such accurate lexical categorization. This can be explained by the characteristics of German including a less (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Michael Peters (2001). Wittgensteinian Pedagogics: Cavell on the Figure of the Child in the Investigations. Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (2):125-138.score: 18.0
    This paper discusses Stanley Cavell's approach to the Investigations,focusing upon his essay – `Notes and Afterthoughts on the Opening ofWittgenstein's Investigations'. First, the paper investigates the waysin which Cavell makes central the figure and `voice' of the child to hisreading of the opening of the Investigations. Second, it argues thatCavell's Notes provides a basis for a Wittgensteinian pedagogics,for not only does it hold up the figure of the child as central to the Investigations but it does so in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Bill Wringe (2011). Cognitive Individualism and the Child as Scientist Program. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 42 (4):518-529.score: 18.0
    n this paper, I examine the charge that Gopnik and Meltzoff’s ‘Child as Scientist’ program, outlined and defended in their 1997 book Words, Thoughts and Theories is vitiated by a form of ‘cognitive individualism’ about science. Although this charge has often been leveled at Gopnik and Meltzoff’s work, it has rarely been developed in any detail. -/- I suggest that we should distinguish between two forms of cognitive individualism which I refer to as ‘ontic’ and ‘epistemic’ cognitive individualism (OCI (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. M. B. M. Bracke, J. H. M. Metz, A. A. Dijkhuizen & B. M. Spruijt (2001). Development of a Decision Support System for Assessing Farm Animal Welfare in Relation to Husbandry Systems: Strategy and Prototype. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 14 (3):321-337.score: 18.0
    Due to increasing empiricalinformation on farm animal welfare since the1960s, the prospects for sound decisionmakingconcerning welfare have improved. This paperdescribes a strategy to develop adecision-making aid, a decision support system,for assessment of farm-animal welfare based onavailable scientific knowledge. Such a decisionsupport system allows many factors to be takeninto account. It is to be developed accordingto the Evolutionary Prototyping Method, inwhich an initial prototype is improved inreiterative updating cycles. This initialprototype has been constructed. It useshierarchical representations to analysescientific statements and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Juliet Tizzard (2004). Sex Selection, Child Welfare and Risk: A Critique of the HFEA's Recommendations on Sex Selection. Health Care Analysis 12 (1):61-68.score: 18.0
    This paper will examine the recent Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority public consultation on sex selection. It will review the current regulation on sex selection in the United Kingdom and critically examine the outcomes of the HFEA consultation. The paper will argue that the current ban on embryo sex selection for social reasons and a proposed ban on sperm selection are not justified. There is no evidence for sex selection causing an increase in sex discrimination; creating a slippery slope towards (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Damian H. Adams (2013). Conceptualising a Child-Centric Paradigm. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (3):369-381.score: 18.0
    Since its inception, donor conception practices have been a reproductive choice for the infertile. Past and current practices have the potential to cause significant and lifelong harm to the offspring through loss of kinship, heritage, identity, and family health history, and possibly through introducing physical problems. Legislation and regulation in Australia that specifies that the welfare of the child born as a consequence of donor conception is paramount may therefore be in conflict with the outcomes. Altering the paradigm to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000