Search results for 'circle' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  89
    Gary Hatfield (2006). The Cartesian Circle. In Stephen Gaukroger (ed.), Blackwell Guide to Descartes’ Meditations. Wiley-Blackwell 122--141.
    The problem of the Cartesian circle, as it is called, has sparked ongoing debate, which intersects several important themes of the Meditations. Discussions of the circle must address questions about the force and scope of the famous method of doubt introduced in Meditation I, and they must examine the intricate arguments for the existence of God and the avoidance of error in Meditations III to V. These discussions raise questions about the possibility of overturning skepticism, once a skeptical (...)
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  2. Nikolay Milkov (2013). The Berlin Group and the Vienna Circle: Affinities and Divergences. In N. Milkov & V. Peckhaus (eds.), The Berlin Group and the Philosophy of Logical Empiricism. Springer, Pp. 3-32 3--32.
    The Berlin Group was an equal partner with the Vienna Circle as a school of scientific philosophy, albeit one that pursued an itinerary of its own. But while the latter presented its defining projects in readily discernible terms and became immediately popular, the Berlin Group, whose project was at least as sig-nificant as that of its Austrian counterpart, remained largely unrecognized. The task of this chapter is to distinguish the Berliners’ work from that of the Vienna Circle and (...)
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  3.  31
    M. Seidel (2016). Changing Society by Scientific Investigations? The Unexpected Shared Ground Between Early Sociology of Knowledge and the Vienna Circle. Foundations of Science 21 (1):117-128.
    In this paper, I show that there are important but hitherto unnoticed similarities between key figures of the Vienna Circle and early defenders of sociology of knowledge. The similarities regard their stance on potential implications of the study of science for political and societal issues. I argue that notably Otto Neurath and Karl Mannheim are concerned with proposing a genuine political philosophy of science that is remarkably different from today’s emerging interest in the relation between science and society in (...)
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  4.  75
    Donata Romizi (2012). The Vienna Circle’s “Scientific World-Conception”: Philosophy of Science in the Political Arena. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 2 (2):205-242.
    This article is intended as a contribution to the current debates about the relationship between politics and the philosophy of science in the Vienna Circle. I reconsider this issue by shifting the focus from philosophy of science as theory to philosophy of science as practice. From this perspective I take as a starting point the Vienna Circle’s scientific world-conception and emphasize its practical nature: I reinterpret its tenets as a set of recommendations that express the particular epistemological attitude (...)
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  5.  19
    Rebekah Nahai & Sophie Österberg (2012). Higher Education in a State of Crisis: A Perspective From a Students' Quality Circle. [REVIEW] AI and Society 27 (3):387-398.
    This article introduces a Students’ Quality Circle in higher education, in the context of current debates. With increasing numbers of students entering the university and constrained financial resources in the sector, new approaches are needed, with new partnership between lecturers and students. The first Students’ Quality Circle at Kingston is located in a wider international context.
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  6.  59
    Jaakko Hintikka (2012). If Logic, Definitions and the Vicious Circle Principle. Journal of Philosophical Logic 41 (2):505-517.
    In a definition (∀ x )(( x є r )↔D[ x ]) of the set r, the definiens D[ x ] must not depend on the definiendum r . This implies that all quantifiers in D[ x ] are independent of r and of (∀ x ). This cannot be implemented in the traditional first-order logic, but can be expressed in IF logic. Violations of such independence requirements are what created the typical paradoxes of set theory. Poincaré’s Vicious Circle (...)
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  7.  7
    Roman Murawski (2015). Cracow Circle and Its Philosophy of Logic and Mathematics. Axiomathes 25 (3):359-376.
    The paper is devoted to the presentation and analysis of the philosophical views concerning logic and mathematics of the leading members of Cracow Circle, i.e., of Jan Salamucha, Jan Franciszek Drewnowski and Józef Maria Bocheński. Their views on the problem of possible applicability of logical tools in metaphysical and theological researches is also discussed.
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  8.  19
    Ruth Weintraub (1997). The Cartesian Circle and Two Forms of Scepticism. History of Philosophy Quarterly 14 (4):365 - 377.
    Descartes’ circle has been extensively discussed, and I do not wish to add another paper to that literature. Rather, I use the circle to facilitate our understanding of two types of scepticism and the proper attitude to them. Descartes’ text is especially apt for this purpose, because a case can be made for attributing to him both types. Although I will touch on the interpretative question, that is not my main aim. My contention is that one brand - (...)
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  9.  10
    Jacques Bair & Valérie Henry (2013). Osculating Circle with Microscopes Within Microscopes. Foundations of Science 18 (2):319-325.
    Classically, an osculating circle at a point of a planar curve is introduced technically, often with formula giving its radius and the coordinates of its center. In this note, we propose a new and intuitive definition of this concept: among all the circles which have, on the considered point, the same tangent as the studied curve and thus seem equal to the curve through a microscope, the osculating circle is this that seems equal to the curve through a (...)
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  10.  17
    László Perecz (2008). The Background Scenery: "Official" Hungarian Philosophy and the Lukács Circle at the Turn of the Century. Studies in East European Thought 60 (1/2):31 - 43.
    This paper is a background study. It gives an overview of the institutions, decisive trends and major achievements of Hungarian philosophy at the beginning of the 20th century. Thus light is shed on the philosophical scenery which forms the background to the Lukács Circle. The paper discusses the relation of the Lukács Circle at the turn of the century to "official" Hungarian philosophy. First, the introduction portrays the various phases of the evolution of Hungarian institutions of philosophy. Then (...)
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  11.  18
    Sahotra Sarkar (ed.) (1996). The Legacy of the Vienna Circle: Modern Reappraisals. Garland Pub..
    A new direction in philosophy Between 1920 and 1940 logical empiricism reset the direction of philosophy of science and much of the rest of Anglo-American philosophy. It began as a relatively organized movement centered on the Vienna Circle, and like-minded philosophers elsewhere, especially in Berlin. As Europe drifted into the Nazi era, several important figures, especially Carnap and Neurath, also found common ground in their liberal politics and radical social agenda. Together, the logical empiricists set out to reform traditional (...)
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  12. Miroslav Vacura (2011). The Analytical Thomism of the Cracow Circle. Filosoficky Casopis 59 (5):689-705.
    The traditional picture of the development of analytical philosophy, represented especially by such thinkers as G. Frege, G. E. Moore, B. Russell or R. Carnap, whose attitude was generally anti-metaphysical, can, on closer study, be shown to be incomplete. This article treats of the Cracow circle – a group of Polish philosophers among whom are, above all, to be counted J. Salamucha, J. M. Bocheński, J. F. Drewnowski, and B. Sobociński, who were, at the beginning of the twentieth century, (...)
     
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  13.  13
    Charles S. Chihara (1973). Ontology and the Vicious-Circle Principle. Ithaca [N.Y.]Cornell University Press.
  14.  4
    Adam Tamas Tuboly (2016). Friedrich Stadler, The Vienna Circle: Studies in the Origins, Development, and Influence of Logical Empiricism. Reviewed By. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 36 (1):26-29.
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  15. Friedrich Stadler (2001). The Vienna Circle Studies in the Origins, Development, and Influence of Logical Empiricism. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  16.  35
    Gordon P. Baker (1988). Wittgenstein, Frege, and the Vienna Circle. Blackwell.
  17.  14
    Juha Manninen & Friedrich Stadler (eds.) (2010). The Vienna Circle in the Nordic Countries: Networks and Transformations of Logical Empiricism. Springer Science + Business Media.
    One of the key events in the relations between the Central European philosophers and those of the Nordic countries was the Second International Congress for the ...
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  18.  50
    Jan Faye (2010). Niels Bohr and the Vienna Circle. Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 14:33-45.
    Logical positivism had an important impact on the Danish intellectual climate before World War Two. During the thirties close relations were established between members of the Vienna Circle and philosophers and scientists in Copenhagen. This influence not only affected Danish philosophy and science; it also impinged on the cultural avant-garde and via them on the public debate concerning social and political reforms. Hand in hand with the positivistic ideas you find functionalism emerging as a new heretical language in art, (...)
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  19.  6
    Jaakko Hintikka (1993). Ludwig’s Apple Tree: On the Philosophical Relations Between Wittgenstein and the Vienna Circle. Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 1:27-46.
    There are many important questions still unresolved concerning the philosophical and personal relations between Ludwig Wittgenstein and the members of the Vienna Circle, and there are also current views on those relationships that do not bear closer scrutiny. For instance, in the last few decades, it has been fashionable to emphasize the differences between the philosophical views of Ludwig Wittgenstein and those of the members of the Vienna Circle. It has even been suggested that the members of the (...)
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  20. T. E. Uebel (ed.) (1991). Rediscovering the Forgotten Vienna Circle: Austrian Studies on Otto Neurath and the Vienna Circle. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
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  21.  3
    Viktor Kraft (1953/1969). The Vienna Circle. New York, Greenwood Press.
  22.  51
    Ramon Cirera (ed.) (1994). Carnap and the Vienna Circle: Empiricism and Logical Syntax. Rodopi.
    In Rudolph Camap (,) established himself as a professor in Vienna. The philosophical atmosphere awaiting him there was not new to him: the year before he ...
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  23.  3
    Tomasz Placek (2014). Vienna Circle on Determinism. Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 17:183-195.
    Members of Vienna Circle explicated determinism in terms of predictability in principle, or calculability. This paper attempts to uncover the rationale for this explication. It argues that the explication was an attempt to escape trivialization arguments; another important factor was the Circle’s views on meaning as testability.
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  24.  3
    Arne Naess (1998). The Spirit of the Vienna Circle Devoted to Questions of Lebens- and Weltauffassung. Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 5:359-367.
    The history of the Vienna Circle is bound up with what was called the Wissenschaftliche Weltauffassung. But with the requirements of the members when it came to deciding whether a sentence expressed scientific knowledge or not, the basic sentences expressing a Lebens- und Weltauffassung would scarcely qualify as such, nor would hypotheses about a scientific world view. The Wissenschaftlichkeit ofphysicalism, logical behaviorism,logical syntax, unity of science, were hypothetical at best, and in my opinion should not be identified with the (...)
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  25.  2
    Friedrich Stadler (2014). From the Vienna Circle to the Institute Vienna Circle: On the Viennese Heritage in Contemporary Philosophy of Science. Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 17:9-32.
    The Vienna Circle as part of the intellectual movement of Central European philosophy of science is certainly one of the most important currents for the emergence of modern philosophy of science. Independent from this uncontested historical fact there remains the question of the direct and indirect infl uence, reception and topicality of this scientifi c community in contemporary general philosophy of science as well as in the philosophy of the individual sciences, including the social sciences and humanities.
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  26.  5
    Lynn A. Cooper & Daniel J. Weintraub (1970). Delboeuf-Type Circle Illusions: Interactions Among Luminance, Temporal Characteristics, and Inducing-Figure Variations. Journal of Experimental Psychology 85 (1):75.
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  27.  2
    Gustav Bergmann (1993). Memories of the Vienna Circle Letter to Otto Neurath. Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 1:193-208.
    On March 12, 1938 the German army crossed the border into Austria. By the following September Gustav Bergmann had managed to send his first wife, Anna, and his daughter, Hanna, to safety in England. In October he managed to leave Austria himself. He first went to the Hague in the Netherlands to see Otto Neurath, who gave him enough money to assist his passage to New York. Bergmann’s prospects were quite uncertain at that time and it was not clear that (...)
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  28.  2
    Anastasios Brenner (2002). The French Connection: Conventionalism and the Vienna Circle. Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 9:277-286.
    In 1929 Moritz Schlick and those scholars he had brought together came to realize that they had given rise to something entirely new, so the text of the Vienna Circle Manifesto has it. What was novel was the conception of the world, henceforth scientific. Or as we may put it otherwise: a discipline had been established, the philosophy of science, that is a reflection on science no longer subordinate to traditional theory of knowledge and metaphysics. The text goes on (...)
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  29.  2
    Gerald Holton (1993). From the Vienna Circle to Harvard Square: The Americanization of a European World Conception. Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 1:47-73.
    In the rise of modern scientific philosophy, one can distinguish four general periods. Its early phase is part of the intellectual history of 19th-century Austria-Hungary. Second, we find it reaching its self-confident form in the 1920s and early ‘30s, chiefly in the collaborative achievements of the Vienna Circle and its analogous groups in Prague, Berlin, Lwow and Warsaw. Third is the period of its further growth and accommodation during the period roughly from the late 1930s to about 1960, especially (...)
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  30.  2
    Gerald Holton (1995). On the Vienna Circle in Exile: An Eyewitness Report. Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 3:269-292.
    During its most vigorous period, the Vienna Circle movement was, by and large, kept rather marginal by the political and academic forces in its European home; they tended to see it as a dangerous search, in the Enlightenment tradition, for a world conception that would be free from metaphysical illusions, free from the kind of clericalism that had a strangle-hold on state and university, and free from the romantic madness of the rising fascist ideology. The wonder, in fact, is (...)
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  31.  2
    Juha Manninen (2010). Between the Vienna Circle and Ludwig Wittgenstein: The Philosophical Teachers of G. H. Von Wright. Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 14:47-67.
    Georg Henrik von Wright always mentioned that his academic teachers had been Eino Kaila and Ludwig Wittgenstein. He even spoke of the two as his “father figures”. Georg Henrik was a sunny boy, but his “fathers” appear to be quite enigmatic. An industry of philosophical literature is needed to interpret Wittgenstein. Kaila seems to be at most a minor figure with some contacts to the Vienna Circle. It is not wrong to see von Wright as a follower of Wittgenstein, (...)
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  32.  2
    Antonia Soulez (1993). The Vienna Circle in France. Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 1:95-112.
    In 1980, Pierre Jacob1 published a book about the itinerary of logical positivism from Vienna to Cambridge , a story of the migration and of the effects of logical positivism in America since the fifties. Christiane Chauviré 2 took the other way round in a paper about the early influence of Peirce’s pragmatism on the Vienna Circle . We are also aware of the importance of logical positivism in England. Sir Alfred Ayer brought it back to England after having (...)
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  33.  14
    Philip Hugly & Charles Sayward (1979). A Semantical Account of the Vicious Circle Principle. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 20 (3):595-598.
    Here we give a semantical account of propositional quantification that is intended to formally represent Russell’s view that one cannot express a proposition about "all" propositions. According to the account the authors give, Russell’s view bears an interesting relation to the view that there are no sets which are members of themselves.
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  34.  3
    E. B. Greene (1932). Effect of Background on Visual Acuity of Circle Grids. Journal of Experimental Psychology 15 (5):585.
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  35.  2
    John Zimmerman, Amy K. Hurst & Michel M. R. Peeters (2007). Fabric-Circle-Slider: Prototype Exploring the Interaction Aesthetic of Contextual Integration. Knowledge, Technology and Policy 20 (1):51-57.
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  36. David Andrew Bell & Wilhelm Vossenkuhl (1992). Wissenschaft Und Subjektivität der Wiener Kreis Und Die Philosophie des 20. Jahrhunderts = Science and Subjectivity : The Vienna Circle and Twentieth Century Philosophy. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  37. Klemens Szaniawski (ed.) (1989). The Vienna Circle and the Lvov-Warsaw School. Dordrecht.
     
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  38. Thomas E. Uebel, Christopher Hookway & London School of Economics and Political Science (1995). The Vienna Circle Revisited. Lse Centre for the Philosophy of the Natural and Social Sciences.
     
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  39. Erik C. Banks (2013). Metaphysics for Positivists: Mach Versus the Vienna Circle. Discipline Filosophiche 23 (1):57-77.
    This article distinguishes between Machian empiricism and the logical positivism of the Vienna Circle and associated philosophers. Mach's natural philosophy was a first order attempt to reform and reorganize physics, not a second order reconstruction of the "language" of physics. Mach's elements were not sense data but realistic events in the natural world and in minds, and Mach admitted unobserved elements as part of his world view. Mach's critique of metaphysics was far more subtle and concerned the elimination of (...)
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  40. Thomas Mormann (2012). A Virtual Debate in Exile: Cassirer and the Vienna Circle After 1933. Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 16:149 - 167.
    Ernst Cassirer, 2011, Symbolische Prägnanz, Ausdrucksphänomen und „Wiener Kreis“, Nachgelassene Manuskripte und Texte, vol. 4, ed. Christian Möckel, 478pp., Hamburg, Felix Meiner Verlag.
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  41.  27
    Andreea Mihali (2015). Squaring the Circle in Descartes’ Meditations The Strong Validation of Reason STEPHEN I. WAGNER Cambridge, New York: Cambridge University Press, 2014; Xi + 244 Pp.; $99.95 ISBN: 9781107072060. [REVIEW] Dialogue 54 (4):799-802.
    In Squaring the Circle in Descartes’ Meditations, Stephen Wagner aims to show that Descartes’ project in the Meditations is best understood as a ‘strong validation of reason’ i.e., as proving in a non-circular way that human reason is a reliable, truth-conducive faculty. For such an enterprise to qualify as a ‘strong’ validation, Wagner contends, skeptical doubt must be given its strongest force. The most stringent doubt available in the Meditations is the deceiving God. To rule out the possibility that (...)
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  42.  27
    Thomas Uebel (2008). Writing a Revolution: On the Production and Early Reception of the Vienna Circle's Manifesto. Perspectives on Science 16 (1):70-102.
    Considerable unclarity exists in the literature concerning the origin and authorship of Wissenschaftliche Weltauffassung. Der Wiener Kreis, the Vienna Circle’s manifesto of 1929 and on the extent of and the reasons for the mixed reception it received in the Circle itself. This paper reconsiders these matters on the light of so far insufªciently consulted documents.
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  43.  30
    Thomas E. Uebel (ed.) (1992). Overcoming Logical Positivism From Within: The Emergence of Neurath's Naturalism in the Vienna Circle's Protocol Sentence Debate. Rodopi.
    Chapter INTRODUCTION: OTTO NEURATH, THE VIENNA CIRCLE AND THE PROTOCOL SENTENCE DEBATE Everybody familiar with contemporary analytical philosophy is likely ...
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  44.  15
    Donato Bergandi (2013). Epilogue: The Epistemic and Practical Circle in an Evolutionary, Ecologically Sustainable Society. In The Structural Links between Ecology, Evolution and Ethics The Virtuous Epistemic Circle. Springer 151-158.
    Abstract In a context of human demographic, technological and economic pressure on natural systems, we face some demanding challenges. We must decide 1) whether to “preserve” nature for its own sake or to “conserve” nature because nature is essentially a reservoir of goods that are functional to humanity’s wellbeing; 2) to choose ways of life that respect the biodiversity and evolutionary potential of the planet; and, to allow all this to come to fruition, 3) to clearly define the role of (...)
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  45.  40
    Sarah S. Richardson (2009). The Left Vienna Circle, Part 1. Carnap, Neurath, and the Left Vienna Circle Thesis. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (1):14-24.
    Recent scholarship resuscitates the history and philosophy of a ‘left wing’ in the Vienna Circle, offering a counterhistory to the conventional image of analytic philosophy as politically conformist. This paper dis- putes the historical claim that early logical empiricists developed a political philosophy of science. Though some individuals in the Vienna Circle, including Rudolf Carnap and Otto Neurath, believed strongly in the importance of science to social progress, they did not construct a political philosophy of science. Both Carnap (...)
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  46.  77
    Kepa Korta & John Perry (2008). The Pragmatic Circle. Synthese 165 (3):347 - 357.
    Classical Gricean pragmatics is usually conceived as dealing with far-side pragmatics, aimed at computing implicatures. It involves reasoning about why what was said, was said. Near-side pragmatics, on the other hand, is pragmatics in the service of determining, together with the semantical properties of the words used, what was said. But this raises the specter of ‘the pragmatic circle.’ If Gricean pragmatics seeks explanations for why someone said what they did, how can there be Gricean pragmatics on the near-side? (...)
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  47. Michael Della Rocca (2005). Descartes, the Cartesian Circle, and Epistemology Without God. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (1):1–33.
    This paper defends an interpretation of Descartes according to which he sees us as having normative (and not merely psychological) certainty of all clear and distinct ideas during the period in which they are apprehended clearly and distinctly. However, on this view, a retrospective doubt about clear and distinct ideas is possible. This interpretation allows Descartes to avoid the Cartesian Circle in an effective way and also shows that Descartes is surprisingly, in some respects, an epistemological externalist. The paper (...)
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  48.  32
    Thomas E. Uebel (2008). On the Production, History, and Aspects of the Reception of the Vienna Circle's Manifesto. Perspectives on Science 16 (1):70-102.
    : Considerable unclarity exists in the literature concerning the origin and authorship of Wissenschaftliche Weltauffassung. Der Wiener Kreis, the Vienna Circle's manifesto of 1929 and on the extent of and the reasons for the mixed reception it received in the Circle itself. This paper reconsiders these matters on the light of so far insufficiently consulted documents.
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  49.  5
    Gregor Betz (2005). The Vicious Circle Theorem – a Graph-Theoretical Analysis of Dialectical Structures. Argumentation 19 (1):53-64.
    This article sets up a graph-theoretical framework for argumentation-analysis (dialectical analysis) which expands classical argument-analysis. Within this framework, a main theorem on the existence of inconsistencies in debates is stated and proved: the vicious circle theorem. Subsequently, two corollaries which generalize the main theorem are derived. Finally, a brief outlook is given on further expansions and possible applications of the developed framework.
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  50.  66
    Sarah S. Richardson (2009). The Left Vienna Circle, Part 2. The Left Vienna Circle, Disciplinary History, and Feminist Philosophy of Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (2):167-174.
    This paper analyzes the claim that the Left Vienna Circle (LVC) offers a theoretical and historical precedent for a politically engaged philosophy of science today. I describe the model for a political philosophy of science advanced by LVC historians. They offer this model as a moderate, properly philosophical approach to political philosophy of science that is rooted in the analytic tradition. This disciplinary-historical framing leads to weaknesses in LVC scholars' conception of the history of the LVC (...)
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