Search results for 'circle' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Nikolay Milkov (2013). The Berlin Group and the Vienna Circle: Affinities and Divergences. In N. Milkov & V. Peckhaus (eds.), The Berlin Group and the Philosophy of Logical Empiricism. Springer, pp. 3-32. 3--32.score: 24.0
    The Berlin Group was an equal partner with the Vienna Circle as a school of scientific philosophy, albeit one that pursued an itinerary of its own. But while the latter presented its defining projects in readily discernible terms and became immediately popular, the Berlin Group, whose project was at least as sig-nificant as that of its Austrian counterpart, remained largely unrecognized. The task of this chapter is to distinguish the Berliners’ work from that of the Vienna Circle and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jaakko Hintikka (2012). If Logic, Definitions and the Vicious Circle Principle. Journal of Philosophical Logic 41 (2):505-517.score: 24.0
    In a definition (∀ x )(( x є r )↔D[ x ]) of the set r, the definiens D[ x ] must not depend on the definiendum r . This implies that all quantifiers in D[ x ] are independent of r and of (∀ x ). This cannot be implemented in the traditional first-order logic, but can be expressed in IF logic. Violations of such independence requirements are what created the typical paradoxes of set theory. Poincaré’s Vicious Circle (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Ramon Cirera (1994). Carnap and the Vienna Circle: Empiricism and Logical Syntax. Rodopi.score: 24.0
    In Rudolph Camap (,) established himself as a professor in Vienna. The philosophical atmosphere awaiting him there was not new to him: the year before he ...
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Donata Romizi (2012). The Vienna Circle’s “Scientific World-Conception”: Philosophy of Science in the Political Arena. HOPOS 2 (2):205-242.score: 24.0
    This article is intended as a contribution to the current debates about the relationship between politics and the philosophy of science in the Vienna Circle. I reconsider this issue by shifting the focus from philosophy of science as theory to philosophy of science as practice. From this perspective I take as a starting point the Vienna Circle’s scientific world-conception and emphasize its practical nature: I reinterpret its tenets as a set of recommendations that express the particular epistemological attitude (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Rebekah Nahai & Sophie Österberg (2012). Higher Education in a State of Crisis: A Perspective From a Students' Quality Circle. [REVIEW] AI and Society 27 (3):387-398.score: 24.0
    This article introduces a Students’ Quality Circle in higher education, in the context of current debates. With increasing numbers of students entering the university and constrained financial resources in the sector, new approaches are needed, with new partnership between lecturers and students. The first Students’ Quality Circle at Kingston is located in a wider international context.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. László Perecz (2008). The Background Scenery: "Official" Hungarian Philosophy and the Lukács Circle at the Turn of the Century. Studies in East European Thought 60 (1/2):31 - 43.score: 24.0
    This paper is a background study. It gives an overview of the institutions, decisive trends and major achievements of Hungarian philosophy at the beginning of the 20th century. Thus light is shed on the philosophical scenery which forms the background to the Lukács Circle. The paper discusses the relation of the Lukács Circle at the turn of the century to "official" Hungarian philosophy. First, the introduction portrays the various phases of the evolution of Hungarian institutions of philosophy. Then (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Sahotra Sarkar (ed.) (1996). The Legacy of the Vienna Circle: Modern Reappraisals. Garland Pub..score: 24.0
    A new direction in philosophy Between 1920 and 1940 logical empiricism reset the direction of philosophy of science and much of the rest of Anglo-American philosophy. It began as a relatively organized movement centered on the Vienna Circle, and like-minded philosophers elsewhere, especially in Berlin. As Europe drifted into the Nazi era, several important figures, especially Carnap and Neurath, also found common ground in their liberal politics and radical social agenda. Together, the logical empiricists set out to reform traditional (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Ruth Weintraub (1997). The Cartesian Circle and Two Forms of Scepticism. History of Philosophy Quarterly 14 (4):365 - 377.score: 24.0
    Descartes’ circle has been extensively discussed, and I do not wish to add another paper to that literature. Rather, I use the circle to facilitate our understanding of two types of scepticism and the proper attitude to them. Descartes’ text is especially apt for this purpose, because a case can be made for attributing to him both types. Although I will touch on the interpretative question, that is not my main aim. My contention is that one brand - (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Jacques Bair & Valérie Henry (2013). Osculating Circle with Microscopes Within Microscopes. Foundations of Science 18 (2):319-325.score: 24.0
    Classically, an osculating circle at a point of a planar curve is introduced technically, often with formula giving its radius and the coordinates of its center. In this note, we propose a new and intuitive definition of this concept: among all the circles which have, on the considered point, the same tangent as the studied curve and thus seem equal to the curve through a microscope, the osculating circle is this that seems equal to the curve through a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Gordon P. Baker (1988). Wittgenstein, Frege, and the Vienna Circle. Blackwell.score: 21.0
  11. Juha Manninen & Friedrich Stadler (eds.) (2010). The Vienna Circle in the Nordic Countries: Networks and Transformations of Logical Empiricism. Springer Science + Business Media.score: 21.0
    One of the key events in the relations between the Central European philosophers and those of the Nordic countries was the Second International Congress for the ...
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Philip Hugly & Charles Sayward (1979). A Semantical Account of the Vicious Circle Principle. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 20 (3):595-598.score: 21.0
    Here we give a semantical account of propositional quantification that is intended to formally represent Russell’s view that one cannot express a proposition about "all" propositions. According to the account the authors give, Russell’s view bears an interesting relation to the view that there are no sets which are members of themselves.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. E. B. Greene (1932). Effect of Background on Visual Acuity of Circle Grids. Journal of Experimental Psychology 15 (5):585.score: 21.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Charles S. Chihara (1973). Ontology and the Vicious-Circle Principle. Ithaca [N.Y.]Cornell University Press.score: 21.0
  15. Lynn A. Cooper & Daniel J. Weintraub (1970). Delboeuf-Type Circle Illusions: Interactions Among Luminance, Temporal Characteristics, and Inducing-Figure Variations. Journal of Experimental Psychology 85 (1):75.score: 21.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. John Zimmerman, Amy K. Hurst & Michel M. R. Peeters (2007). Fabric-Circle-Slider: Prototype Exploring the Interaction Aesthetic of Contextual Integration. Knowledge, Technology and Policy 20 (1):51-57.score: 21.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Viktor Kraft (1953/1969). The Vienna Circle. New York, Greenwood Press.score: 21.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Thomas Mormann (2012). A Virtual Debate in Exile: Cassirer and the Vienna Circle After 1933. Vienna Circle Institute Yearbook 16:149 - 167.score: 18.0
  19. Michael Della Rocca (2005). Descartes, the Cartesian Circle, and Epistemology Without God. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (1):1–33.score: 18.0
    This paper defends an interpretation of Descartes according to which he sees us as having normative (and not merely psychological) certainty of all clear and distinct ideas during the period in which they are apprehended clearly and distinctly. However, on this view, a retrospective doubt about clear and distinct ideas is possible. This interpretation allows Descartes to avoid the Cartesian Circle in an effective way and also shows that Descartes is surprisingly, in some respects, an epistemological externalist. The paper (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Erik C. Banks (2013). Metaphysics for Positivists: Mach Versus the Vienna Circle. Discipline Filosophiche 23 (1):57-77.score: 18.0
    This article distinguishes between Machian empiricism and the logical positivism of the Vienna Circle and associated philosophers. Mach's natural philosophy was a first order attempt to reform and reorganize physics, not a second order reconstruction of the "language" of physics. Mach's elements were not sense data but realistic events in the natural world and in minds, and Mach admitted unobserved elements as part of his world view. Mach's critique of metaphysics was far more subtle and concerned the elimination of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Albert Mosley, Expanding the Moral Circle: From Racism to Speciesism.score: 18.0
    This paper reviews the argument by Peter Singer that speciesism, the exploitation of other species without regard for their interests, is as morally objectionable as racism and sexism. Objections to this argument by philosophers such as Peter Carruthers, Mary Midgley, and Cora Diamond as well as conventional wisdom about notions of species differences are presented and critically examined. I conclude that Alaine Locke would have supported Singer's expansion of the moral circle.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Sarah S. Richardson (2009). The Left Vienna Circle, Part 2. The Left Vienna Circle, Disciplinary History, and Feminist Philosophy of Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (2):167-174.score: 18.0
    This paper analyzes the claim that the Left Vienna Circle (LVC) offers a theoretical and historical precedent for a politically engaged philosophy of science today. I describe the model for a political philosophy of science advanced by LVC historians. They offer this model as a moderate, properly philosophical approach to political philosophy of science that is rooted in the analytic tradition. This disciplinary-historical framing leads to weaknesses in LVC scholars' conception of the history of the LVC and its contemporary (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Kepa Korta & John Perry (2008). The Pragmatic Circle. Synthese 165 (3):347 - 357.score: 18.0
    Classical Gricean pragmatics is usually conceived as dealing with far-side pragmatics, aimed at computing implicatures. It involves reasoning about why what was said, was said. Near-side pragmatics, on the other hand, is pragmatics in the service of determining, together with the semantical properties of the words used, what was said. But this raises the specter of ‘the pragmatic circle.’ If Gricean pragmatics seeks explanations for why someone said what they did, how can there be Gricean pragmatics on the near-side? (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Sirkku Ikonen (2011). Cassirer's Critique of Culture: Between the Scylla of Lebensphilosophie and the Charybdis of the Vienna Circle. Synthese 179 (1):187 - 202.score: 18.0
    My purpose in this paper is to look at Cassirer's relation to critical philosophy from a new perspective. Most discussions concerning Cassirer's Kantianism have so far centered on his relation to neo-Kantianism and the Marburg school. My focus will not be on neo-Kantianism but on Cassirer's notion of a "critique of culture." In an often cited paragraph from the introduction to The Philosophy of Symbolic Forms, Cassirer says that his aim is to broaden Kant's critical approach to all various forms (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Herbert De Vriese (2008). The Myth of the Metaphysical Circle: An Analysis of the Contemporary Crisis of the Critique of Metaphysics. Inquiry 51 (3):312 – 341.score: 18.0
    Examination of contemporary debates on metaphysics and its critique yields the conclusion that there is an overall tendency to defend an inextricable bond between them. According to the vast majority of participants in these debates, any reaction against metaphysics, however powerful or radical, is bound to remain trapped in the metaphysical tradition. The dominant view is that criticism either remains tied to or eventually returns to forms of metaphysics, if it does not in fact remain metaphysical in itself. This view (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. David G. Stern (2007). Wittgenstein, the Vienna Circle, and Physicalism: A Reassessment. In Alan Richardson & Thomas Uebel (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Logical Empiricism. Cambridge University Press. 305--31.score: 18.0
    The "standard account" of Wittgenstein’s relations with the Vienna Circle is that the early Wittgenstein was a principal source and inspiration for the Circle’s positivistic and scientific philosophy, while the later Wittgenstein was deeply opposed to the logical empiricist project of articulating a "scientific conception of the world." However, this telegraphic summary is at best only half-true and at worst deeply misleading. For it prevents us appreciating the fluidity and protean character of their philosophical dialogue. In retrospectively attributing (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Dale Jacquette (1996). Descartes' Lumen Naturale and the Cartesian Circle. Philosophy and Theology 9 (3-4):273-320.score: 18.0
    The author argues that Descartes is not trapped inside the Cartesian circle. The essay rehearses Descartes’ argument against the “evil demon” hypothesis. The so-called Cartesian circle is described and some of the most prominent discussions of the problem are evaluated. Such arguments tend either to leave Descartes in the circle, or themselves depend upon distinctions that in the end lead to Descartes claiming something less than metaphysical certainty for his system. The author argues that Descartes’ real Archimedian (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Thomas Uebel (2011). Linguistics and the Vienna Circle. Metascience 20 (2):377-379.score: 18.0
    Linguistics and the Vienna Circle Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11016-010-9445-9 Authors Thomas Uebel, Department of Philosophy, School of Social Science, University of Manchester, Arthur Lewis Building, Manchester, M13 9PL UK Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Thomas E. Uebel (1996). Anti-Foundationalism and the Vienna Circle's Revolution in Philosophy. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 47 (3):415-440.score: 18.0
    The tendency to attribute foundationalist ambitions to the Vienna Circle has long obscured our view of its attempted revolution in philosophy. The present paper makes the case for a consistently epistemologically anti-foundationalist interpretation of all three of the Circle's main protagonists: Schlick, Carnap, and Neurath. Corresponding to the intellectual fault lines within the Circle, two ways of going about the radical reorientation of the pursuit of philosophy will then be distinguished and the contemporary potential of Carnap's and (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Thomas E. Uebel (2008). On the Production, History, and Aspects of the Reception of the Vienna Circle's Manifesto. Perspectives on Science 16 (1):70-102.score: 18.0
    : Considerable unclarity exists in the literature concerning the origin and authorship of Wissenschaftliche Weltauffassung. Der Wiener Kreis, the Vienna Circle's manifesto of 1929 and on the extent of and the reasons for the mixed reception it received in the Circle itself. This paper reconsiders these matters on the light of so far insufficiently consulted documents.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Thomas Uebel (2010). What's Right About Carnap, Neurath and the Left Vienna Circle Thesis: A Refutation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (2):214-221.score: 18.0
    This paper rejects as unfounded a recent criticism of research on the so-called left wing of the Vienna Circle and the claim that it sported a political philosophy of science. The demand for ‘specific, local periodized claims’ is turned against the critic. It is shown (i) that certain criticisms of Red Vienna’s leading party cannot be transferred to the members of the Circle involved in popular education, nor can criticism of Carnap’s Aufbau be transferred to Neurath’s unified science (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Michael Hymers (2005). Going Around the Vienna Circle: Wittgenstein and Verification. Philosophical Investigations 28 (3):205–234.score: 18.0
    I argue that Wittgenstein’s short-lived verificationism (c.1929-30) differed from that of his contacts in the Vienna Circle in not being a reductionist view. It lay the groundwork for his later views that the meaning of a word is determined by its use and that certain "propositions of the form of empirical propositions" (On Certainty, §§96, 401, 402) act as "norm[s] of description" (On Certainty,§§167, 321). He gave it up once he realized that it contradicted his rejection of logical atomism, (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Brian McGuinness (1985). Wittgenstein and the Vienna Circle. Synthese 64 (3):351 - 358.score: 18.0
    This essay examines the role allocated to ostensive definition in the logical empiricist philosophy of the vienna circle. it explains how this characteristic array of doctrines grew out of reflections on the "tractatus". the various theses are distinguished into general principles, logical aspects, normative aspects and psychological theses. a detailed survey of wittgenstein's later analysis of ostensive definition is undertaken. this is then brought to bear on the doctrines of logical empiricism to show that they are incoherent. the essay (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Sarah S. Richardson (2009). The Left Vienna Circle, Part 1. Carnap, Neurath, and the Left Vienna Circle Thesis. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (1):14-24.score: 18.0
    Recent scholarship resuscitates the history and philosophy of a ‘left wing’ in the Vienna Circle, offering a counterhistory to the conventional image of analytic philosophy as politically conformist. This paper dis- putes the historical claim that early logical empiricists developed a political philosophy of science. Though some individuals in the Vienna Circle, including Rudolf Carnap and Otto Neurath, believed strongly in the importance of science to social progress, they did not construct a political philosophy of science. Both Carnap (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Pascale Hugon (2009). Breaking the Circle. Dharmakīrti's Response to the Charge of Circularity Against the Apoha Theory and its Tibetan Adaptation. Journal of Indian Philosophy 37 (6):533-557.score: 18.0
    This paper examines the Buddhist’s answer to one of the most famous (and more intuitive) objections against the semantic theory of “exclusion” ( apoha ), namely, the charge of circularity. If the understanding of X is not reached positively, but X is understood via the exclusion of non-X, the Buddhist nominalist is facing a problem of circularity, for the understanding of X would depend on that of non-X, which, in turn, depends on that of X. I distinguish in this paper (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Thomas Oberdan (1998). The Vienna Circle's 'Anti-Foundationalism'. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 49 (2):297-308.score: 18.0
    Uebel has recently claimed that, contrary to popular opinion, none of the philosophers of the Vienna Circle of Logical Positivists were proponents of epistemological foundationalism. According to the considerations of the current discussion, however, Uebel's conclusion is erroneous, especially with respect to the work of Moritz Schlick. The chief reason Uebel offers to support his conclusion is that current attempts to portray Schlick's epistemology as foundationalist fail to overcome its ‘ultimate incoherence’. In contrast, it is argued that current interpretations, (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. M. J. Cresswell (2004). The Voices of Wittgenstein: The Vienna Circle. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (3):550 – 551.score: 18.0
    Book Information The Voices of Wittgenstein: The Vienna Circle. The Voices of Wittgenstein: The Vienna Circle Ludwig Wittgenstein and Friedrich Waismann , ed. Gordon Baker , London : Routledge , 2003 , 528 , US$100 ( cloth ) Edited by Gordon Baker . By Ludwig Wittgenstein. and Friedrich Waismann. Routledge. London. Pp. 528. US$100 (cloth:).
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Alexander Naraniecki (2010). Neo-Positivist or Neo-Kantian? Karl Popper and the Vienna Circle. Philosophy 85 (4):511-530.score: 18.0
    This paper re-contextualises Popper within a Kantian tradition by examining his interaction with the Vienna Circle. The complexity of Popper's relationship to the Vienna Circle is often a point of confusion as some view him as a member of the Vienna Circle while others minimise his association with this group. This paper argues that Popper was not a member of the Vienna Circle or a positivist but shared many neo-Kantian philosophical tendencies with the members of the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Thomas E. Uebel (1992). Overcoming Logical Positivism From Within: The Emergence of Neurath's Naturalism in the Vienna Circle's Protocol Sentence Debate. Rodopi.score: 18.0
    Chapter INTRODUCTION: OTTO NEURATH, THE VIENNA CIRCLE AND THE PROTOCOL SENTENCE DEBATE Everybody familiar with contemporary analytical philosophy is likely ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. James O. Young (1991). Coherence, Anti-Realism and the Vienna Circle. Synthese 86 (3):467 - 482.score: 18.0
    Some members of the Vienna Circle argued for a coherence theory of truth. Their coherentism is immune to standard objections. Most versions of coherentism are unable to show why a sentence cannot be true even though it fails to cohere with a system of beliefs. That is, it seems that truth may transcend what we can be warranted in believing. If so, truth cannot consist in coherence with a system of beliefs. The Vienna Circle's coherentists held, first, that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Philippe Rouilhan (1992). Russell and the Vicious Circle Principle. Philosophical Studies 65 (1-2):169 - 182.score: 18.0
    The standard version of the story of Russell's theory of types gives legitimately precedence to the vicious circle principle, but it fails to appreciate the significance of the doctrine of incomplete symbols and of the ultimate universalist perspective of Russell's logic. It is what the Author tries to do. This enables him to resolve the apparent contradiction which exists in "Principles" between the ontological commitment of the theory itself with respect to individuals, propositions, and functions, and the inventory of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Sahotra Sarkar (ed.) (1996). The Emergence of Logical Empiricism: From 1900 to the Vienna Circle. Garland Publishing.score: 18.0
    A new direction in philosophy Between 1920 and 1940 logical empiricism reset the direction of philosophy of science and much of the rest of Anglo-American philosophy. It began as a relatively organized movement centered on the Vienna Circle, and like-minded philosophers elsewhere, especially in Berlin. As Europe drifted into the Nazi era, several important figures, especially Carnap and Neurath, also found common ground in their liberal politics and radical social agenda. Together, the logical empiricists set out to reform traditional (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Thomas Uebel (2008). Writing a Revolution: On the Production and Early Reception of the Vienna Circle's Manifesto. Perspectives on Science 16 (1):70-102.score: 18.0
    Considerable unclarity exists in the literature concerning the origin and authorship of Wissenschaftliche Weltauffassung. Der Wiener Kreis, the Vienna Circle’s manifesto of 1929 and on the extent of and the reasons for the mixed reception it received in the Circle itself. This paper reconsiders these matters on the light of so far insufªciently consulted documents.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Georgia Warnke (2011). The Hermeneutic Circle Versus Dialogue. The Review of Metaphysics 65 (1):91-112.score: 18.0
    At the start of his account of hermeneutic experience, Gadamer quotes Heidegger: “Our first, last and constant task is never to allow our fore-having, fore-sight and fore-conception to be presented to us by fancies and popular conceptions, but rather to make the scientific theme secure by working out these fore-structures in terms of the things themselves.” Heidegger’s “fore-structures” reflect our practical pre-understanding and ongoing engagement with our world or “the things themselves.” Yet, if so, how can we work these fore-structures (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Maria Carla Galavotti (ed.) (2004). Cambridge and Vienna: Frank P. Ramsey and the Vienna Circle. Dordrecht: Springer Netherlands.score: 18.0
    The Institute Vienna Circle held a conference in Vienna in 2003, Cambridge and Vienna a?
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Gábor A. Zemplén (2004). Newton's Colour Circle and Palmer's “Normal” Colour Space. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):166-168.score: 18.0
    Taking the real Newtonian colour circle – and not the one Palmer depicts as Newton's – we don't have to wait 300 years for Palmer to say no to the Lockean aperçu about the inverted spectrum. One of the aims of this historical detour is to show that one's commitment about the “topology” of the colour space greatly affects Palmer's argument.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Ewing Y. Chinn (1983). A Journey Around the Cartesian Circle. Philosophy Research Archives 9:279-292.score: 18.0
    According to many critics, Descartes argued in a circle when he presumed to base the certainty (and thus knowledge) of propositions that fulfill his epistemic criterion of being “clearly and distinctly perceived” on the demonstration that God exists and is not a deceiver. But his critics say, that demonstration, as he presented it, presupposed the validity of the same epistemic criterion. I critically examine two major strategies to dispel the appearance of circularity, two ways of interpreting Descartes’ argument.My approach (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. I. A. Kieseppá (2002). Stadler, Friedrich: The Vienna Circle. Studies in Theorigins, Development, and Influence of Logicalempiricism. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 33 (2):409-416.score: 18.0
    Reviews the book "The Vienna Circle. Studies in the Origins, Development, and Influence of Logical Empiricism," by Friedrich Stadler.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Darryl Jung (1999). Russell, Presupposition, and the Vicious-Circle Principle. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 40 (1):55-80.score: 18.0
    Prompted by Poincaré, Russell put forward his celebrated vicious-circle principle (vcp) as the solution to the modern paradoxes. Ramsey, Gödel, and Quine, among others, have raised two salient objections against Russell's vcp. First, Gödel has claimed that Russell's various renderings of the vcp really express distinct principles and thus, distinct solutions to the paradoxes, a claim that gainsays one of Russell's positions on the nature of the solution to the paradoxes, namely, that such a solution be uniform. Secondly, Ramsey, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Michael Della Rocca (2005). Descartes, the Cartesian Circle, and Epistemology Without God. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (1):1-33.score: 18.0
    This paper defends an interpretation of Descartes according to which he sees us as having normative (and not merely psychological) certainty of all clear and distinct ideas during the period in which they are apprehended clearly and distinctly. However, on this view, a retrospective doubt about clear and distinct ideas is possible. This interpretation allows Descartes to avoid the Cartesian Circle in an effective way and also shows that Descartes is surprisingly, in some respects, an epistemological externalist. The paper (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000