Search results for 'classical liberalism' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Matt Zwolinski (2011). Classical Liberalism and the Basic Income. Basic Income Studies 6 (2):1-14.score: 240.0
    This paper provides a brief overview of the relationship between libertarian political theory and the Universal Basic Income (UBI). It distinguishes between different forms of libertarianism and argues that a one form, classical liberalism, is compatible with and provides some grounds of support for UBI. A classical liberal UBI, however, is likely to be much smaller than the sort of UBI defended by those on the political left. And there are both contingent empirical reasons and principled moral (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Nicolas Maloberti (2011). Government by Choice: Classical Liberalism and the Moral Status of Immigration Barriers. The Independent Review 15 (4):540-561.score: 240.0
    Could we plausibly believe in the fundamental tenets of classical liberalism and, at the same time, support the state’s raising of immigration barriers? The thesis of this paper is that if we accept the main tenets of classical liberalism as essentially correct, we should regard immigration barriers as essentially illegitimate. Considered under ideal conditions, immigration barriers constitute an unjustified infringement on individuals’ ownership rights, since it is difficult to identify a purpose that such an infringement could (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Nicolas Maloberti (2012). New Approaches to Classical Liberalism. Rationality, Markets and Morals 3:22-50.score: 240.0
    This article focuses on the following three novel and original philosophical approaches to classical liberalism: Den Uyl and Rasmussen’s perfectionist argument from meta-norms, Gaus’s justificatory model, and Kukathas’s conscience-based theory of authority. None of these three approaches are utilitarian or consequentialist in character. Neither do they appeal to the notion of a rational bargain as it is typical within contractarianism. Furthermore, each of these theory rejects the idea that classical liberalism should be grounded on considerations of (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. David Ellerman, Does Classical Liberalism Imply Democracy?score: 240.0
    There is a fault line running through classical liberalism as to whether or not democratic self-governance is a necessary part of a liberal social order. The democratic and non-democratic strains of classical liberalism are both present today—particularly in America. Many contemporary libertarians and neo-Austrian economists represent the non-democratic strain. We will take the late James M. Buchanan as a representative of democratic classical liberalism (with assists from the earlier democratic classical liberal philosophers, John (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Lawrence R. Cima & Thomas L. Schubeck (2001). Self-Interest, Love, and Economic Justice: A Dialogue Between Classical Economic Liberalism and Catholic Social Teaching. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 30 (3):213 - 231.score: 180.0
    This essay seeks to start a dialogue between two traditions that historically have interpreted the economy in opposing ways: the individualism of classic economic liberalism (CEL), represented by Adam Smith and Milton Friedman, and the communitarianism of Catholic social teaching (CST), interpreted primarily through the teachings of popes and secondarily the U.S. Catholic bishops. The present authors, an economist and a moral theologian who identify with one or the other of the two traditions, strive to clarify objectively their similarities (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Michael Stephen Lopato (2014). George H. Smith, The System of Liberty: Themes in the History of Classical Liberalism. Journal of Value Inquiry 48 (1):157-159.score: 180.0
    In The System of Liberty: Themes in the History of Classical Liberalism, George H. Smith focuses his thematic approach regarding the study of classical liberal political philosophy on both natural-rights philosophers, in what Smith deems the “Lockean Paradigm,” and nineteenth-century utilitarian liberals. Smith does not merely provide an overview of the history of this theory—rather, he attempts to discover how and why liberal theory had faced major challenges in the nineteenth-century with regard to both its theoretical foundations (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Stephen Dilley (2013). And Classical Liberalism. In , Darwinian Evolution and Classical Liberalism: Theories in Tension. Lexington Books. 1.score: 180.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Elizabeth Rapaport (2013). Classical Liberalism and Rawlsian Revisionism. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 7 (sup1):95-119.score: 180.0
    (1977). Classical Liberalism and Rawlsian Revisionism. Canadian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 7, Supplementary Volume 3: New Essays on Contract Theory, pp. 95-119.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Jason Brennan & John Tomasi (2012). Classical Liberalism. In David Estlund (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Political Philosophy. Oxford University Press, Usa. 115.score: 162.0
  10. Vaughn Bryan Baltzly (2014). 2014 Rockefeller Prize Winner: Four Strikes for Pluralist Liberalism (And Two Cheers for Classical Liberalism). Journal of Value Inquiry 48 (3):315-333.score: 156.0
    Value Pluralism is the view, perhaps most famously associated with Isaiah Berlin, that at its most fundamental level, human value is irreducibly heterogeneous. On this account, rival conceptions of life’s meaning and value – both religious and secular – are thought to represent equally valid, though mutually incompatible, modes of genuine human flourishing. Such divergent values are said to be incommensurable – we cannot compare the worth of one to another, as they do not reduce to any common value, nor (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Michael Zuckert (2001). Natural Law, Natural Rights, and Classical Liberalism: On Montesquieu's Critique of Hobbes. Social Philosophy and Policy 18 (1):227-251.score: 150.0
    Montesquieu is not often thought of as a significant natural law thinker. The article on natural law in the International Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences discusses many theorists of the natural law, but Montesquieu is not among them. A valuable older survey of natural law theorizing by legal philosopher A. P. d'EntrThomas Aquinas, Hugo Grotius, even Georg Hegel. A yet more comprehensive survey of the topic, Natural Law and Human Dignity, by French philosopher and social theorist Ernst Bloch, does not (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Frank M. Coleman (2010). Classical Liberalism and American Landscape Representation: The Imperial Self in Nature. Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (1):75 – 96.score: 150.0
    Here it is shown that 'vacant nature' is deployed as sign in Anglo-American landscape representation of the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries to support a Cartesian imaginary of spatial extension. The referent of this imaginary is variously denoted as 'America' (John Locke), the 'north west' (Jefferson), the 'wilderness' (Ralph Waldo Emerson), and the 'frontier' (Frederick Jackson Turner) but throughout it is essentially the same 'vacant' landscape; its function is to produce a site and space of appearance for an imperial self, an (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. David Archard (1996). Classical Liberalism: The Unvanquished Ideal by David Conway Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1995, Ix + 150 Pp., £40.00. [REVIEW] Philosophy 71 (278):628-.score: 150.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Daniel J. Smith (2012). Mark Pennington, Robust Political Economy: Classical Liberalism and the Future of Public Policy. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 46 (4):519-522.score: 150.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Judith Lee Kissell (1998). Getting Beyond Classical Liberalism: The Human Body and the Property Paradigm. Medicine, Healthcare and Philosophy 1 (3):279-281.score: 150.0
  16. Leonard P. Liggio (1977). Charles Dunoyer and French Classical Liberalism. Journal of Libertarian Studies 1 (3):153-78.score: 150.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. David Miller (1988). On Classical Liberalism and Libertarianism. Philosophical Books 29 (3):169-170.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Chris R. Tame (1998). The Revolution of Reason: Peter Gay, The Enlightenment, and the Ambiguities of Classical Liberalism. Journal of Libertarian Studies 1 (3).score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Stephen Dilley (ed.) (2013). Darwinian Evolution and Classical Liberalism: Theories in Tension. Lexington Books.score: 150.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Logan Paul Gage, Bruce L. Gordon, Shawn Klein, Roger Masters, Angus Menuge, Michael J. White, Jay W. Richards, Timothy Sandefur, Richard Weikart, John West & Benjamin Wiker (2013). Darwinian Evolution and Classical Liberalism: Theories in Tension. Lexington Books.score: 150.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Gary D. Gd Glenn (1975). Abortion and Inalienable Rights in Classical Liberalism. American Journal of Jurisprudence 20 (1):62.score: 150.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Deepak Lal (2008). Reviving the Invisible Hand: The Case for Classical Liberalism in the Twenty-First Century. Princeton University Press.score: 150.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. J. C. Lester (2006). In Defence of the Realm: The Place of Nations in Classical Liberalism David Conway. Journal of Libertarian Studies 20 (3):81.score: 150.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Andrew Vincent (1990). Classical Liberalism and its Crisis of Identity. History of Political Thought 11 (1):143-161.score: 150.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Gerald Gaus (2010). Coercion, Ownership, and the Redistributive State: Justificatory Liberalism's Classical Tilt. Social Philosophy and Policy 27 (01):233-.score: 126.0
    Justificatory liberalism1 rests on a conception of members of the public as free and equal. To say that each is free implies that each has a fundamental claim to act as she sees fit on the basis of her own reasoning. To say that each is equal is to insist that members of the public are symmetrically placed insofar as no one has a natural right to command others, nor does anyone have a natural duty to defer to the reasoning (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Struan Jacobs (1999). Classical and Conservative Liberalism. Tradition and Discovery 26 (1):5-15.score: 126.0
    An extended discussion of Richard Allen’s Beyond Liberalism: The Political Thought of F. A. Hayek & Michael Polanyi in which the book’s prominent themes and arguments are described, and certain inaccuracies and shortcomings noted.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Jan Narveson (1997). Classical Vs. Modern Liberalism: Advantage, Classical'. In Sirkku Hellsten, Marjaana Kopperi & Olli Loukola (eds.), Taking the Liberal Challenge Seriously: Essays on Contemporary Liberalism at the Turn of the 21st Century. Ashgate. 9.score: 126.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. W. Ver Eecke (1982). Ethics in Economics: From Classical Economics to Neo-Liberalism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 9 (2):146-167.score: 120.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Leo Strauss (1959). The Liberalism of Classical Political Philosophy. Review of Metaphysics 12 (3):390 - 439.score: 120.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Andrew Lister (2013). The Classical Tilt of Justificatory Liberalism. European Journal of Political Theory 12 (3):316-326.score: 120.0
  31. W. Ver Eecke (1982). Ethics in Economics: From Classical Economics to Neo-Liberalism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 9 (2):146-167.score: 120.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Loren Lomasky (2000). Liberty and Welfare Goods: Reflections on Clashing Liberalisms. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 4 (1-2):99-113.score: 90.0
    Among the numerous moral commodities that political orders can produceand protect, classical liberalism assigns primacy to liberty, understoodas noninterference. As the nineteenth century advanced into its secondhalf, this primacy was increasingly seen as myopic. A more defensibleliberalism will devote itself to a wider range of basic human interests:this critique gained virtually unanimous acceptance within the newliberalism. Yet, surprisingly, during the past two decades classicalliberalism seems to have enjoyed a resurrection. This essay arguesthat it is well merited, that the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Carol Hay (2012). Consonances Between Liberalism and Pragmatism. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 48 (2):141-168.score: 72.0
    This paper is an attempt to identify certain consonances between contemporary liberalism and classical pragmatism. I identify four of the most trenchant criticisms of classical liberalism presented by pragmatist figures such as James, Peirce, Dewey, Addams, and Hocking: that liberalism overemphasizes negative liberty, that it is overly individualistic, that its pluralism is suspect, that it is overly abstract. I then argue that these deficits of liberalism in its historical incarnations are being addressed by contemporary (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Wim Dubbink & Bert van de Ven (2012). On the Duties of Commission in Commercial Life. A Kantian Criticism of Moral Institutionalism. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (2):221-238.score: 72.0
    In latter-day discussions on corporate morality, duties of commission are fiercely debated. Moral institutionalists argue that duties of commission—such as a duty of assistance—overstep the boundaries of moral duty owed by economic agents. “Moral institutionalism” is a newly coined term for a familiar position on market morality. It maintains that market morality ought to be restricted, excluding all duties of commission. Neo-Classical thinkers such as Baumol and Homann defend it most eloquently. They underpin their position with concerns that go (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Lubomira Radoilska (2009). Public Health Ethics and Liberalism. Public Health Ethics 2 (2):135-145.score: 66.0
    This paper defends a distinctly liberal approach to public health ethics and replies to possible objections. In particular, I look at a set of recent proposals aiming to revise and expand liberalism in light of public health's rationale and epidemiological findings. I argue that they fail to provide a sociologically informed version of liberalism. Instead, they rest on an implicit normative premise about the value of health, which I show to be invalid. I then make explicit the unobvious, (...)
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Sergiu Miscoiu (2010). Liberalism Against the Nation: A False Hypothesis of Historical Analysis. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 4 (12):49-55.score: 66.0
    The main objective of this essay is to offer an answer to the following question: Is there a scientific ground for the theory of the historical opposition between liberalism and the nation? In order to answer this question, this essay is organised in three parts. The first part identifies the position of the nation within the classical liberal discourse; the second identifies the crucial moment of the 1950’s as the precise period in which a major change in the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Raquel Díaz Seijas (2011). Liberalismo clásico Y neoliberalismo. La encrucijada de Martín Diego Farrell. Anales de la Cátedra Francisco Suárez 45:271 - 296.score: 66.0
    This article focuses on the critique that Martín Diego Farrell, a leading Argentinean legal philosopher, makes of utilitarianism, and on his fundamental argument, the restriction of freedom is sacrificed on the altars of a greater utility. The author considers it necessary to assess this critique of utilitarianism because many contemporary liberal philosophers take it as the starting point for the abandonment of utilitarianism. In the author’s opinion, it is the beginning of a dangerous pathway towards an extreme relativism. She has (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. H. G. Callaway (1994). Liberalism and the Moral Significance of Individualism. Reason Papers 19 (Fall):13-29.score: 60.0
    A liberalism which scorns all individualism is fundamentally misguided. This is the chief thesis of this paper. To argue for it, I look closely at some key concepts. The concepts of morislity and individualism are crucial. I emphasize Dewey on the "individuality of the mind" and a Deweyan discussion of language, communication, and community. The thesis links individualism and liberalism, and since appeals to liberalism have broader appeal in the present context of discussions, I start with consideration (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Matthew Lister (2011). Review of Gerald Gaus, The Order of Public Reason. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Review.score: 60.0
  40. Barbara J. Thayer-Bacon (2006). Beyond Liberal Democracy: Dewey's Renascent Liberalism. Education and Culture 22 (2):19-30.score: 60.0
    : My project aims to develop a relational, pluralistic political theory that moves us beyond liberal democracy, and to consider how such a theory translates into our public school settings. In this essay I argue that Dewey offers us possibilities for moving beyond one key assumption of classical liberalism, individualism, with his theory of social transaction. I focus my discussion for this paper on Dewey's renascent liberal democracy. I move from a discussion of Dewey's liberal democratic theory to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Fred Eidlin (2005). Popper's Social‐Democratic Politics and Free‐Market Liberalism. Critical Review 17 (1-2):25-48.score: 60.0
    Abstract Holding unlimited economic freedom to be nearly as dangerous as physical violence, Karl Popper advocated ?piecemeanl? economic intervention by the state. Jeremy Shearmur's recent book on Popper contends that as the philosopher aged, his views grew closer to classical liberalism than those expressed in The Open Society?consistently with what Shearmur sees as the logic of Popper's arguments. But Popper's philosophy, while recognizing that any project aimed at bringing about social change must be immensely complex and fraught with (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Logan Paul Gage (2013). Darwin Knows Best: Can Evolution Support the Classical Liberal Vision of the Family? In Stephen Dilley (ed.), Darwinian Evolution and Classical Liberalism: Theories in Tension. Lexington Books. 135-156.score: 60.0
    In a time when conservatives believe that the traditional family is under increasing fire, some think an appeal to Darwinian science may be the answer. I argue that these conservatives are wrong to maintain that Darwinian theory can serve as the intellectual foundation for the traditional conception of the family. Contra Larry Arnhart and James Q. Wilson, a Darwinian philosophy of nature simply lacks the stability the traditional family requires; it cannot support the traditional conception of human nature and the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Hugh Breakey (2014). Parsing Macpherson: The Last Rites of Locke the Possessive Individualist. Theoria 80 (1):62-83.score: 60.0
    C.B. Macpherson's “Possessive Individualist” reading of Locke is one of the most radical and influential interpretations in the history of exegesis. Despite a substantial critical response over the past five decades, Macpherson's reading remains orthodox in various circles in the humanities generally, particularly in legal studies, and his interpretation of several crucial passages has unwittingly been followed even by his sharpest critics within Lockean scholarship. In order to present the definitive rebuttal to this interpretation, and so finally to lay it (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Henk te Velde (2008). The Organization of Liberty Dutch Liberalism as a Case of the History of European Constitutional Liberalism. European Journal of Political Theory 7 (1):65-79.score: 60.0
    The historiography of European liberalism has been dominated by large countries; this contribution focuses on the successful tradition of liberalism in the Netherlands. Just like German liberalism (but unlike the British 19th-century model), the spirit of Dutch 19th-century liberalism was constitutional (in the sense of being legal and juridical). It assumed that constitutional rules in a certain sense produced liberty, because liberty was not possible without a legally guaranteed context. Today the Dutch liberal party tries to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. N. Scott Arnold (2009). Imposing Values: Liberalism and Regulation. OUP USA.score: 60.0
    A major question for liberal politics and liberal political theory concerns the proper scope of government. Liberalism has always favored limited government, but there has been wide-ranging dispute among liberals about just how extensive the scope of government should be. Included in this dispute are questions about the extent of state ownership of the means of production, redistribution of wealth and income through the tax code and transfer programs, and the extent of government regulation. One of N. Scott Arnold's (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Roger Masters (2013). Liberalism and Darwinism. In Stephen Dilley (ed.), Darwinian Evolution and Classical Liberalism: Theories in Tension. Lexington Books. 217.score: 60.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Debra Satz (2007). Liberalism, Economic Freedom, and the Limits of Markets. Social Philosophy and Policy 24 (1):120-140.score: 54.0
    This paper points to a lost and ignored strand of argument in the writings of liberalism's earliest defenders. These “classical” liberals recognized that market liberty was not always compatible with individual liberty. In particular, they argued that labor markets required intervention and regulation if workers were not to be wholly subjugated to the power of their employers. Functioning capitalist labor markets (along with functioning credit markets) are not “natural” outgrowths of exchange, but achievements hard won in the battle (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Frank van Dun, Political Liberalism and The Formal Rechtsstaat.score: 54.0
    Drieu Godefridi’s “Critique de l’utopie libertarienne”1 is not only an attempt to refute Rothbardian anarcholibertarian theory but also an attempt to resurrect the idea of the formal Rechtsstaat.2 I shall say a few words about the first topic and then present some arguments for resisting the introduction of that idea into classical liberal discourse. Contrary to Godefridi’s suggestion, there is no logical or historical ground for considering the Rechtsstaat a necessary or even useful condition of freedom. I do not (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. José Daniel Parra Quintero (2010). Between Carl Schmitt and Thomas Hobbes: A Study of Modern Liberalism From Leo Strauss' Thought. [Spanish]. Eidos 12:48-86.score: 54.0
    Normal 0 21 false false false ES-CO X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} This essay presents a reading of modern liberalism from Leo Strauss´thought. Starting with his analysis of Carl Schmitt’s Concept of the Political and its critique of liberal “neutralization and depolitization”, Strauss posits an affirmation of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Jacob Segal (1994). A Storm From Paradise: Liberalism and the Problem of Time. Critical Review 8 (1):23-48.score: 54.0
    The tendency of classical politics to embed the individual in universal and transcendental patterns of action followed in part from the recognition of the futility of unpredictable action oriented to the individual's transient personal future. By contrast, F. A. Hayek argues for liberalism and the rule of law because it is instrumental to the achievement of human ends. Michael Oakeshott, however, claims that freedom is a value in itself, and that liberalism should emphasize moral autonomy because the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000