Search results for 'classical theory' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
See also:
  1. Mehmet Karabela (2011). The Development of Dialectic and Argumentation Theory in Post-Classical Islamic Intellectual History. Dissertation, McGill Universityscore: 192.0
    This dissertation is an analysis of the development of dialectic and argumentation theory in post-classical Islamic intellectual history. The central concerns of the thesis are; treatises on the theoretical understanding of the concept of dialectic and argumentation theory, and how, in practice, the concept of dialectic, as expressed in the Greek classical tradition, was received and used by five communities in the Islamic intellectual camp. It shows how dialectic as an argumentative discourse diffused into five communities (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Don Ross (2008). Classical Game Theory, Socialization and the Rationalization of Conventions. Topoi 27 (1-2):57-72.score: 192.0
    The paper begins by providing a game-theoretic reconstruction of Gilbert’s (1989) philosophical critique of Lewis (1969) on the role of salience in selecting conventions. Gilbert’s insight is reformulated thus: Nash equilibrium is insufficiently powerful as a solution concept to rationalize conventions for unboundedly rational agents if conventions are solutions to the kinds of games Lewis supposes. Both refinements to NE and appeals to bounded rationality can plug this gap, but lack generality. As Binmore (this issue) argues, evolutive game theory (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Timothy H. Boyer (2010). Blackbody Radiation and the Scaling Symmetry of Relativistic Classical Electron Theory with Classical Electromagnetic Zero-Point Radiation. Foundations of Physics 40 (8):1102-1116.score: 192.0
    It is pointed out that relativistic classical electron theory with classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation has a scaling symmetry which is suitable for understanding the equilibrium behavior of classical thermal radiation at a spectrum other than the Rayleigh-Jeans spectrum. In relativistic classical electron theory, the masses of the particles are the only scale-giving parameters associated with mechanics while the action-angle variables are scale invariant. The theory thus separates the interaction of the action variables of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. W. S. Cooper (1989). How Evolutionary Biology Challenges the Classical Theory of Rational Choice. Biology and Philosophy 4 (4):457-481.score: 186.0
    A fundamental philosophical question that arises in connection with evolutionary theory is whether the fittest patterns of behavior are always the most rational. Are fitness and rationality fully compatible? When behavioral rationality is characterized formally as in classical decision theory, the question becomes mathematically meaningful and can be explored systematically by investigating whether the optimally fit behavior predicted by evolutionary process models is decision-theoretically coherent. Upon investigation, it appears that in nontrivial evolutionary models the expected behavior is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Peter Novak (1998). Logic and the Classical Theory of Mind. Journal of Philosophical Logic 27 (4):389-434.score: 180.0
    I extract several common assumptions in the Classical Theory of Mind (CTM) - mainly of Locke and Descartes - and work out a partial formalisation of the logic implicit in CTM. I then define the modal (logical) properties and relations of propositions, including the modality of conditional propositions and the validity of argument, according to the principles of CTM: that is, in terms of clear and distinct ideas, and without any reference to either possible worlds, or deducibility in (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Storrs McCall (1970). A Non-Classical Theory of Truth, with an Application to Intuitionism. American Philosophical Quarterly 7 (1):83 - 88.score: 180.0
    Any "classical" theory of truth will satisfy tarski's criterion ("p" is true if and only if p), And the principle of bivalence (every proposition is either true or false). A non-Classical theory may be obtained by rejecting these principles: - in fact it is shown that rejection of the second entails rejection of the first. If the resulting non-Classical theory is formalized, A system structurally isomorphic to either s4 or s5 is obtained. An attempt (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. J. W. G. Wignall (1987). The Nonrelativistic Schrödinger Equation in “Quasi-ClassicalTheory. Foundations of Physics 17 (2):123-147.score: 180.0
    The author has recently proposed a “quasi-classicaltheory of particles and interactions in which particles are pictured as extended periodic disturbances in a universal field χ(x, t), interacting with each other via nonlinearity in the equation of motion for χ. The present paper explores the relationship of this theory to nonrelativistic quantum mechanics; as a first step, it is shown how it is possible to construct from χ a configuration-space wave function Ψ(x 1,x 2,t), and that the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Graham Parsons (2013). What is the Classical Theory of Just Cause? A Response to Reichberg. Journal of Military Ethics 12 (4):357-369.score: 174.0
    Gregory Reichberg’s argument against my reading of the classical just war theorists falsely assumes that if just cause is unilateral, then there is no moral equality of combatants. This assumption is plausible if we assume an individualist framework. However, the classical theorists accepted quasi-Aristotelian, communitarian social ontologies and theories of justice. For them, the political community is ontologically and morally prior to the private individual. The classical just war theorists build their theories within this framework. They argue (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Ave Mets (2013). Measurement Theory, Nomological Machine And Measurement Uncertainties (In Classical Physics). Studia Philosophica Estonica 5 (2):167-186.score: 168.0
    Measurement is said to be the basis of exact sciences as the process of assigning numbers to matter (things or their attributes), thus making it possible to apply the mathematically formulated laws of nature to the empirical world. Mathematics and empiria are best accorded to each other in laboratory experiments which function as what Nancy Cartwright calls nomological machine: an arrangement generating (mathematical) regularities. On the basis of accounts of measurement errors and uncertainties, I will argue for two claims: 1) (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. G. Robert Grice, Laraine Masters & David L. Kohfeld (1966). Classical Conditioning Without Discrimination Training: A Test of the Generalization Theory of CS Intensity Effects. Journal of Experimental Psychology 72 (4):510.score: 168.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Beate Jahn (ed.) (2006). Classical Theory in International Relations. Cambridge University Press.score: 164.0
    Classical political theorists such as Thucydides, Kant, Rousseau, Smith, Hegel, Grotius, Mill, Locke and Clausewitz are often employed to explain and justify contemporary international politics and are seen to constitute the different schools of thought in the discipline. However, traditional interpretations frequently ignore the intellectual and historical context in which these thinkers were writing as well as the lineages through which they came to be appropriated in International Relations. This collection of essays provides alternative interpretations sensitive to these political (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Tomas Georg Hellström (2011). Aesthetic Creativity: Insights From Classical Literary Theory on Creative Learning. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (4):321-335.score: 162.0
    This paper addresses the subject of textual creativity by drawing on work done in classical literary theory and criticism, specifically new criticism, structuralism and early poststructuralism. The question of how readers and writers engage creatively with the text is closely related to educational concerns, though they are often thought of as separate disciplines. Modern literary theory in many ways collapses this distinction in its concern for how literariness is achieved and, specifically, how ‘literary quality’ is accomplished in (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. V. I. Danilov & A. Lambert-Mogiliansky (2010). Expected Utility Theory Under Non-Classical Uncertainty. Theory and Decision 68 (1-2):25-47.score: 162.0
    In this article, Savage’s theory of decision-making under uncertainty is extended from a classical environment into a non-classical one. The Boolean lattice of events is replaced by an arbitrary ortho-complemented poset. We formulate the corresponding axioms and provide representation theorems for qualitative measures and expected utility. Then, we discuss the issue of beliefs updating and investigate a transition probability model. An application to a simple game context is proposed.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Piergiorgio Odifreddi (1989). Classical Recursion Theory: The Theory of Functions and Sets of Natural Numbers. Sole Distributors for the Usa and Canada, Elsevier Science Pub. Co..score: 162.0
    Volume II of Classical Recursion Theory describes the universe from a local (bottom-up or synthetical) point of view, and covers the whole spectrum, from the recursive to the arithmetical sets. The first half of the book provides a detailed picture of the computable sets from the perspective of Theoretical Computer Science. Besides giving a detailed description of the theories of abstract Complexity Theory and of Inductive Inference, it contributes a uniform picture of the most basic complexity classes, (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Andrei Khrennikov (2011). Prequantum Classical Statistical Field Theory: Schrödinger Dynamics of Entangled Systems as a Classical Stochastic Process. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 41 (3):317-329.score: 156.0
    The idea that quantum randomness can be reduced to randomness of classical fields (fluctuating at time and space scales which are essentially finer than scales approachable in modern quantum experiments) is rather old. Various models have been proposed, e.g., stochastic electrodynamics or the semiclassical model. Recently a new model, so called prequantum classical statistical field theory (PCSFT), was developed. By this model a “quantum system” is just a label for (so to say “prequantum”) classical random field. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Michael Winterbottom (1974). Aldo Scaglione: The Classical Theory of Composition From its Origins to the Present: A Historical Survey. Pp. 447. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1972. Cloth, $15. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 24 (02):299-300.score: 156.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Rogers Brubaker (1985). Rethinking Classical Theory. Theory and Society 14 (6):745-775.score: 156.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Julian B. Barbour (1994). The Timelessness of Quantum Gravity: I. The Evidence From the Classical Theory. Classical and Quantum Gravity 11:2853--73.score: 156.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Craig Calhoun (1989). Classical Social Theory and the French Revolution of 1848. Sociological Theory 7 (2):210-225.score: 150.0
    Three of the classic "founding fathers" of sociology (Comte, Marx and Tocqueville) were contemporary observers of the French Revolution of 1848. In addition, another important theoretical tradition was represented in contemporary observations of 1848 by Pierre-Joseph Proudhon. The present paper summarizes aspects of the views of these theoretically minded observers, notes some points at which more recent historical research suggests revisions to these classical views, and poses three arguments: (1) The revolution of 1848 exerted a direct shaping influence on (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Dennis Earl, The Classical Theory of Concepts. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 150.0
  21. Louis Green (1990). Galvano Fiamma, Azzone Visconti and the Revival of the Classical Theory of Magnificence. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 53:98-113.score: 150.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Panu Raatikainen (2013). Classical Theory of Concepts. In Pashler Harold (ed.), Encyclopedia of the mind. SAGE Publications. Vol. 3, pp. 151-154.score: 150.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Istvan S. N. Berkeley (2001). Peter Novak, Mental Symbols: A Defence of the Classical Theory of Mind. Studies in Cognitive Systems 19, Dordrecht, Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1997, XXII + 266 Pp., $114.00, ISBN 0-7923-4370-. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 11 (1):148-150.score: 150.0
  24. John Levi Martin (1998). Authoritative Knowledge and Heteronomy in Classical Sociological Theory. Sociological Theory 16 (2):99-130.score: 150.0
    This article traces the impact of philosophical questions regarding the grounds of moral autonomy and heteronomy (rule-from-another as opposed to rule-from-oneself) on classical sociological theory, arguing that both Weber and Durkheim understood sociology to have a contribution to make in the debate with Kant over the grounds of ethical action. Both insisted that the only possible ethical action was one within the bounds of rational knowledge that was inherently authoritative, but this sat uneasily with their focus on the (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Joseph Agassi, Fundamenta Scientiae, 9, 1988, 189-202 (Slightly Revised) Neo-Classical Economics as 18th Century Theory Of.score: 150.0
    1. The Real Claim of the Chicago School If anything dramatic has happened in economic theory over the last one hundred years – namely, since the advent of marginalism – then, everyone agrees, it was not the rise of the Chicago neo -classical school which, after all, only synthesized the various versions of marginalism, but the Keynesian Revolution. Assessments of this revolution were repeatedly invited, particularly by opponent, chiefly from Chicago. F. A. von Hayek has explicitly and bitterly (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Eric Margolis (1994). A Reassessment of the Shift From the Classical Theory of Concepts to Prototype Theory. Cognition 51 (1):73-89.score: 150.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Daniel D. Novotný (2008). Forty-Two Years After Suárez. Mastri and Belluto's Development of the «Classical» Theory of Entia Rationis. Quaestio 8 (1):473-498.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. James King (1981). Hume's Classical Theory of Justice. Hume Studies 7 (1):32-54.score: 150.0
  29. Edward Walter (1990). Keynesian Economic Theory .And the Revival of Classical Theory. Social Philosophy Today 4:99-121.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. R. F. Hathaway & L. D. Houlgate (1969). The Platonic Minos and the Classical Theory of Natural Law. American Journal of Jurisprudence 14 (1):105-115.score: 150.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Quentin Skinner (2004). Hobbes and the Classical Theory of Laughter. In Tom Sorell & Luc Foisneau (eds.), Leviathan After 350 Years. Oxford University Press. 139--166.score: 150.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. John Finnis (2002). Natural Law: The Classical Theory. In Jules Coleman & Scott J. Shapiro (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law. Oup Oxford.score: 150.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Mazen Maurice Guirguis (1998). Peter Novak, Mental Symbols: A Defense of the Classical Theory of Mind Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 18 (2):139-141.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Arnold Koslow (1976). Ontological and Ideological Issues of the Classical Theory of Space and Time. In Peter K. Machamer & Robert G. Turnbull (eds.), Motion and Time, Space and Matter. Ohio State University Press. 224--263.score: 150.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Adolph Lowe (forthcoming). The Classical Theory of Economic Growth. Social Research.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Stephen L. Mills (1989). Connectionism, the Classical Theory of Cognition, and the Hundred Step Constraint. Acta Analytica 4 (4):5-38.score: 150.0
  37. A. Pampapathy Rao (1970). Classical Theory of First Order Logic. Simla,Indian Institute of Advanced Study.score: 150.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Dan Sperber (1986). Salvaging Parts of the “Classical Theory” of Categorization. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):668.score: 150.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. R. Srivastava (2002). Mill's Classical Theory of Democracy. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 29 (2/3):237-252.score: 150.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Solomon Feferman, The Proof Theory of Classical and Constructive Inductive Definitions. A 40 Year Saga, 1968-2008.score: 146.0
    1. Pohlers and The Problem. I first met Wolfram Pohlers at a workshop on proof theory organized by Walter Felscher that was held in Tübingen in early April, 1973. Among others at that workshop relevant to the work surveyed here were Kurt Schütte, Wolfram’s teacher in Munich, and Wolfram’s fellow student Wilfried Buchholz. This is not meant to slight in the least the many other fine logicians who participated there.2 In Tübingen I gave a couple of survey lectures (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Edward Feser (2010). Classical Natural Law Theory, Property Rights, and Taxation. Social Philosophy and Policy 27 (1):21-52.score: 144.0
    Classical natural law theory derives moral conclusions from the essentialist and teleological understanding of nature enshrined in classical metaphysics. The paper argues that this understanding of nature is as defensible today as it was in the days of Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, and Aquinas. It then shows how a natural law theory of the grounds and content of our moral obligations follows from this understanding of nature, and how a doctrine of natural rights follows in turn from (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Erik Curiel, Classical Mechanics is Lagrangian; It is Not Hamiltonian; the Semantics of Physical Theory is Not Semantical.score: 144.0
    One can (for the most part) formulate a model of a classical system in either the Lagrangian or the Hamiltonian framework. Though it is often thought that those two formulations are equivalent in all important ways, this is not true: the underlying geometrical structures one uses to formulate each theory are not isomorphic. This raises the question whether one of the two is a more natural framework for the representation of classical systems. In the event, the answer (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Craig J. Calhoun (ed.) (2007). Classical Sociological Theory. Blackwell Pub..score: 144.0
    This comprehensive collection of classical sociological theory is a definitive guide to the roots of sociology from its undisciplined beginnings to its current guideposts and reference points in contemporary sociological debate. A definitive guide to the roots of sociology through a collection of key writings from the founders of the discipline Explores influential works of Marx, Durkheim, Weber, Mead, Simmel, Freud, Du Bois, Adorno, Marcuse, Parsons, and Merton Editorial introductions lend historical and intellectual perspective to the substantial readings (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Kirk Ludwig & Susan Schneider (2008). Fodor's Challenge to the Classical Computational Theory of Mind. Mind and Language 23 (1):123–143.score: 144.0
    In The Mind Doesn’t Work that Way, Jerry Fodor argues that mental representations have context sensitive features relevant to cognition, and that, therefore, the Classical Computational Theory of Mind (CTM) is mistaken. We call this the Globality Argument. This is an in principle argument against CTM. We argue that it is self-defeating. We consider an alternative argument constructed from materials in the discussion, which avoids the pitfalls of the official argument. We argue that it is also unsound and (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Heinz Krüger (1993). Classical Limit of Real Dirac Theory: Quantization of Relativistic Central Field Orbits. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 23 (9):1265-1288.score: 144.0
    The classical limit of real Dirac theory is derived as the lowest-order contribution in $\mathchar'26\mkern-10mu\lambda = \hslash /mc$ of a new, exact polar decomposition. The resulting classical spinor equation is completely integrated for stationary solutions to arbitrary central fields. Imposing single-valuedness on the covering space of a bivector-valued extension to these classical solutions, orbital angular momentum, energy, and spin directions are quantized. The quantization of energy turns out to yield the WKB formula of Bessey, Uhlenbeck, and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. David Malament (2004). On the Time Reversal Invariance of Classical Electromagnetic Theory. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 35 (2):295-315.score: 144.0
    David Albert claims that classical electromagnetic theory is not time reversal invariant. He acknowledges that all physics books say that it is, but claims they are ``simply wrong" because they rely on an incorrect account of how the time reversal operator acts on magnetic fields. On that account, electric fields are left intact by the operator, but magnetic fields are inverted. Albert sees no reason for the asymmetric treatment, and insists that neither field should be inverted. I argue, (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. John T. Bruer (1982). The Classical Limit of Quantum Theory. Synthese 50 (2):167 - 212.score: 144.0
    Both physicists and philosophers claim that quantum mechanics reduces to classical mechanics as 0, that classical mechanics is a limiting case of quantum mechanics. If so, several formal and non-formal conditions must be satisfied. These conditions are satisfied in a reduction using the Wigner transformation to map quantum mechanics onto the classical phase plane. This reduction does not, however, assist in providing an adequate metaphysical interpretation of quantum theory.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. David Malament (2006). Classical Relativity Theory. In Jeremy N. Butterfield & John Earman (eds.), Philosophy of Physics. Elsevier.score: 144.0
    This survey article is divided into two parts. In the first (section 2), I give a brief account of the structure of classical relativity theory. In the second (section 3), I discuss three special topics: (i) the status of the relative simultaneity relation in the context of Minkowski spacetime; (ii) the ``geometrized" version of Newtonian gravitation theory (also known as Newton-Cartan theory); and (iii) the possibility of recovering the global geometric structure of spacetime from its ``causal (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Zbigniew Oziewicz (1994). Classical Field Theory and Analogy Between Newton's and Maxwell's Equations. Foundations of Physics 24 (10):1379-1402.score: 144.0
    A bivertical classical field theory includes the Newtonian mechanics and Maxwell's electromagnetic field theory as the special cases. This unification allows one to recognize the formal analogies among Newtonian mechanics and Maxwell's electrodynamics.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. A. Carati & L. Galgani (2001). Theory of Dynamical Systems and the Relations Between Classical and Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 31 (1):69-87.score: 144.0
    We give a review of some works where it is shown that certain quantum-like features are exhibited by classical systems. Two kinds of problems are considered. The first one concerns the specific heat of crystals (the so called Fermi–Pasta–Ulam problem), where a glassy behavior is observed, and the energy distribution is found to be of Planck-like type. The second kind of problems concerns the self-interaction of a charged particle with the electromagnetic field, where an analog of the tunnel effect (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000