Search results for 'co-evolution' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Max Velmans (2007). The Co-Evolution of Matter and Consciousness. Velmans, Prof Max (2007) the Co-Evolution of Matter and Consciousness. [Journal (Paginated)] 44 (2):273-282.
    Theories about the evolution of consciousness relate in an intimate way to theories about the distribution of consciousness, which range from the view that only human beings are conscious to the view that all matter is in some sense conscious. Broadly speaking, such theories can be classified into discontinuity theories and continuity theories. Discontinuity theories propose that consciousness emerged only when material forms reached a given stage of evolution, but propose different criteria for the stage at which this occurred. Continuity (...)
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  2. Helena Knyazeva & Sergei Kurdyumov (2001). Nonlinear Synthesis and Co-Evolution of Complex Systems. World Futures 57 (3):239-261.
    Today a change is imperative in approaching global problems: what is needed is not arm-twisting and power politics, but searching for ways of co-evolution in the complex social and geopolitical systems of the world. The modern theory of self-organization of complex systems provides us with an understanding of the possible forms of coexistence of heterogeneous social and geopolitical structures at different stages of development regarding the different paths of their sustainable co-evolutionary development. The theory argues that the evolutionary channel (...)
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  3.  6
    Bart Boer (2016). Modeling Co‐Evolution of Speech and Biology. Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (2):459-468.
    Two computer simulations are investigated that model interaction of cultural evolution of language and biological evolution of adaptations to language. Both are agent-based models in which a population of agents imitates each other using realistic vowels. The agents evolve under selective pressure for good imitation. In one model, the evolution of the vocal tract is modeled; in the other, a cognitive mechanism for perceiving speech accurately is modeled. In both cases, biological adaptations to using and learning speech evolve, even though (...)
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  4.  18
    Carla C. J. M. Millar, Chong-Ju Choi & Philip Y. K. Cheng (2009). Co-Evolution: Law and Institutions in International Ethics Research. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 87 (4):455 - 462.
    Despite the importance of the co-evolution approach in various branches of research, such as strategy, organisation theory, complexity, population ecology, technology and innovation (Lewin et al., 1999; March, 1991), co-evolution has been relatively neglected in international business and ethics research (Madhok and Phene, 2001). The purpose of this article is to show how co-evolution theory provides a theoretical framework within which some issues of ethics research are addressed. Our analysis is in the context of the contrasts between (...)
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  5.  42
    Pierre De Loor, Kristen Manac’H. & Jacques Tisseau (2009). Enaction-Based Artificial Intelligence: Toward Co-Evolution with Humans in the Loop. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 19 (3):319-343.
    This article deals with the links between the enaction paradigm and artificial intelligence. Enaction is considered a metaphor for artificial intelligence, as a number of the notions which it deals with are deemed incompatible with the phenomenal field of the virtual. After explaining this stance, we shall review previous works regarding this issue in terms of artificial life and robotics. We shall focus on the lack of recognition of co-evolution at the heart of these approaches. We propose to explicitly (...)
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  6.  12
    Frank Kressing, Matthis Krischel & Heiner Fangerau (2014). The ‘Global Phylogeny’ and its Historical Legacy: A Critical Review of a Unified Theory of Human Biological and Linguistic Co-Evolution. [REVIEW] Medicine Studies 4 (1-4):15-27.
    In a critical review of late twentieth-century gene-culture co-evolutionary models labelled as ‘global phylogeny’, the authors present evidence for the long legacy of co-evolutionary theories in European-based thinking, highlighting that ideas of social and cultural evolution preceded the idea of biological evolution, linguistics played a dominant role in the formation of a unified theory of human co-evolution, and that co-evolutionary thinking was only possible due to perpetuated and renewed transdisciplinary reticulations between scholars of different disciplines—especially within the integrative framework (...)
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  7.  3
    Bodo Winter & Andrew Wedel (2016). The Co‐Evolution of Speech and the Lexicon: The Interaction of Functional Pressures, Redundancy, and Category Variation. Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (2):503-513.
    The sound system of a language must be able to support a perceptual contrast between different words in order to signal communicatively relevant meaning distinctions. In this paper, we use a simple agent-based exemplar model in which the evolution of sound-category systems is understood as a co-evolutionary process, where the range of variation within sound categories is constrained by functional pressure to keep different words perceptually distinct. We show that this model can reproduce several observed effects on the range of (...)
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  8.  6
    Stephan Greiner & Ralph Bock (2013). Tuning a Ménage À Trois: Co‐Evolution and Co‐Adaptation of Nuclear and Organellar Genomes in Plants. Bioessays 35 (4):354-365.
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  9. Stephen Gough (2009). Co-Evolution, Knowledge and Education: Adding Value to Learners’ Options. Studies in Philosophy and Education 28 (1):27-38.
  10. Nigel Nicholson (2011). The Evolved Self, Self-Regulation, and the Co-Evolution of Leadership. Biological Theory 6 (4):399-412.
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  11.  24
    W. Tecumseh Fitch (2008). Co-Evolution of Phylogeny and Glossogeny: There is No “Logical Problem of Language Evolution”. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):521-522.
    Historical language change (), like evolution itself, is a fact; and its implications for the biological evolution of the human capacity for language acquisition () have been ably explored by many contemporary theorists. However, Christiansen & Chater's (C&C's) revolutionary call for a replacement of phylogenetic models with glossogenetic cultural models is based on an inadequate understanding of either. The solution to their lies before their eyes, but they mistakenly reject it due to a supposed Gene/;culture co-evolution poses a series (...)
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  12.  19
    Urooj Quezon Amjad (2006). A System of Innovation? Integrated Water Resources Management Complemented with Co-Evolution: Examples From Palestinian and Israeli Joint Water Management. World Futures 62 (3):157 – 170.
    A concept of co-evolution is argued to complement Integrated Water Resource Management's gap in administrative integration. Co-evolution's complement to Integrated Water Resource Management is explored through issues surrounding joint water management arrangements between the Israelis and Palestinians in the late 1990s and early 21st century. How co-evolution contributes to such a water management approach highlights how we might think about what it means to encourage innovation. Conclusions of the article suggest co-evolution provides the language and description (...)
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  13.  20
    James R. Hurford & Simon Kirby (1998). Co-Evolution of Language-Size and the Critical Period. In [Book Chapter] (Unpublished).
    Species evolve, very slowly, through selection of genes which give rise to phenotypes well adapted to their environments. The cultures, including the languages, of human communities evolve, much faster, maintaining at least a minimum level of adaptedness to the external, non- cultural environment. In the phylogenetic evolution of species, the transmission of information across generations is via copying of molecules, and innovation is by mutation and sexual recombination. In cultural evolution, the transmission of information across generations is by learning, and (...)
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  14.  19
    James R. Hurford (2008). Niche-Construction, Co-Evolution, and Domain-Specificity. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):526-526.
    That language is shaped to fit the human brain is close to the Chomskyan position. The target article by Christiansen & Chater (C&C) assumes an entity, outside individual heads. What is the nature of this entity? Linguistic niche-construction and co-evolution of language and genes are possible, with some of what evolved being language-specific. Recent generative theory postulates much less than the old Universal Grammar (UG).
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  15.  2
    Lorenzo Magnani (2011). External Diagrammatization and Iconic Brain Co-Evolution. Semiotica 2011 (186):213-238.
    Our brains make up a series of signs and are engaged in making or manifesting or reacting to a series of signs: through this semiotic activity they are at the same time engaged in “being minds.” An important effect of this semiotic activity of brains is a continuous process of “externalization of the mind” that exhibits a new cognitive perspective on the mechanisms underlying the semiotic emergence of abductive processes of meaning formation. I consider this process of externalization interplay critical (...)
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  16. Michael Horace Barnes (2000). Stages of Thought: The Co-Evolution of Religious Thought and Science. Oxford University Press Usa.
    In Stages of Thought, Michael Barnes examines a pattern of cognitive development that has evolved over thousands of years--a pattern manifest in both science and religion. He describes how the major world cultures built upon our natural human language skills to add literacy, logic, and, now, a highly critical self-awareness. In tracing the histories of both scientific and religious thought, Barnes shows why we think the way that we do today. Although religious and scientific modes of thought are often portrayed (...)
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  17.  1
    Max Velmans (2008). La co-évolution de la matière et de la conscience. Synthesis Philosophica 22 (2):273-282.
    Les théories de l’évolution de la conscience sont étroitement liées aux théories de la distribution de la conscience qui vont des approches considérant que seulement l’homme a une conscience jusqu’aux approches considérant que toute matière possède une conscience en quelque sorte. De manière générale, on peut distinguer les théories de la discontinuité des théories de la continuité. Les théories de la discontinuité considèrent que la conscience est apparue seulement une fois que les formes matérielles ont atteint un certain degré d’évolution (...)
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  18.  48
    Ben Jeffares (2010). The Co-Evolution of Tools and Minds: Cognition and Material Culture in the Hominin Lineage. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (4):503-520.
    The structuring of our environment to provide cues and reminders for ourselves is common: We leave notes on the fridge, we have a particular place for our keys where we deposit them, making them easy to find. We alter our world to streamline our cognitive tasks. But how did hominins gain this capacity? What pushed our ancestors to structure their physical environment in ways that buffered thinking and began the process of using the world cognitively? I argue that the capacity (...)
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  19.  10
    Cheshko Valentin & Yulia Kosova (2015). The Semantics of Transdisciplinary Concepts of Socio-Natural Co-Evolution: A Constructive Utopia, Social Verification and Evolutionary Risk. In Teodor N. Țîrdea (ed.), Strategia supravie uirii din perspectiva bioeticii, filosofiei și medicinei. Culegere de articole științifice. Vol. 21 / Sub redacția prof. univrsitar, dr. hab. în filosofie . – Chișinău: Print-Caro. Print-Caro 112-116.
    The utopian character of modern scientific theories, with the human nature as a subject, is an inevitable consequence of the presence of an imperative component of transdisciplinary human dimensional scientific knowledge. Its social function is the adaptation of the descriptive component of the theory to the given socio-cultural type that simplifies the passage of the process of social verification of the theory. The genesis of bioethics can be seen as one of the basic premises for the actualization of the anthropic (...)
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  20. Michael A. Arbib (2001). Co-Evolution of Human Consciousness and Language. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 929:195-220.
  21.  9
    Peter S. Albin & Duncan K. Foley (2001). The Co‐Evolution of Cooperation and Complexity in a Multi‐Player, Local‐Interaction Prisoners' Dilemma. Complexity 6 (3):54-63.
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  22. Jonathan Bach & David Stark (2004). Link, Search, Interact: The Co-Evolution of NGOs and Interactive Technology. Theory, Culture and Society 21 (3):101-117.
    International institutions are being transformed by the twinned appearance of new non-governmental organizations and new technologies. How do these processes co-evolve? If we were limited to three words to describe the new interactive technologies of the Web, we would highlight the following logics: link, search, interact. Whereas in other systems these logics are additive, on the Web they can be recombinatory. Search, for example, can be conducted based on the structure of links, leading to new patterns of interaction, new links (...)
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  23. Graciela Kuechle & Diego Rios (2012). Frequency Dependence Arguments for the Co-Evolution of Genes and Culture. In Martin H. Brinkworth & Friedel Weinert (eds.), Evolution 2.0: Implications of Darwinism in Philosophy and the Social and Natural Sciences. Springer
     
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  24.  7
    Jordan Zlatev (2008). The Co-Evolution of Intersubjectivity and Bodily Mimesis. In J. Zlatev, T. Racine, C. Sinha & E. Itkonen (eds.), The Shared Mind: Perspectives on Intersubjectivity. John Benjamins 215--244.
  25. Nikolai Krementsov (2010). Darwinism, Marxism, and Genetics in the Soviet Union: The Dialectics of Co-Evolution. In Denis Alexander & Ronald L. Numbers (eds.), Biology and Ideology From Descartes to Dawkins. The University of Chicago Press
  26.  23
    Christian Arnsperger, Probing the “Moralization of Capitalism” Problem: Democratic Experimentalism and the Co-Evolution of Norms.
    In what sense can we aim to moralize the very system upon which we rely to formulate our notions of morality? This is the most fundamental issue raised by any discussion around the “moralization of capitalism”. In an even more general manner, one could express the issue in terms of the puzzle of second-order morality: How exactly is it possible to pass a moral judgment on our categories of moral judgment? How can our norms of morality be said to be (...)
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  27.  23
    Michael Cavanaugh (1999). Review: The Symbolic Species: The Co-Evolution of Language and the Brain By Terrence W. Deacon. [REVIEW] Zygon 34 (1):195-198.
  28.  2
    Clemens Driessen & Leonie F. M. Heutinck (2015). Cows Desiring to Be Milked? Milking Robots and the Co-Evolution of Ethics and Technology on Dutch Dairy Farms. Agriculture and Human Values 32 (1):3-20.
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  29.  6
    David Katerndahl (2012). Co‐Evolution of Departmental Research Collaboration and Scholarly Outcomes. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (6):1241-1247.
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  30.  13
    Ronnie Zoe Hawkins (2006). Introduction: Beyond Nature/Culture Dualism: Let's Try Co-Evolution Instead of "Control". Ethics and the Environment 11 (2):1-11.
  31.  11
    Ulrich Fiedeler (2011). When Does the Co-Evolution of Technology and Science Overturn Into Technoscience? Poiesis and Praxis 8 (2-3):83-101.
    In this paper, the relations between science and technology, intervention and representation, the natural and the artificial are analysed on the background of the formation of modern science in the sixteenth century. Due to the fact that technique has been essential for modern science from its early beginning, modern science is characterised by a hybridisation of knowledge and intervention. The manipulation of nature in order to measure its properties has steadily increased until artificial things have been produced, such as laser (...)
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  32.  11
    Ken Baskin (2000). Corporate DNA: Organizational Learning, Corporate Co-Evolution. [REVIEW] Emergence: Complexity and Organization 2 (1):34-49.
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  33.  11
    Richard Dawkins (1989). Universal Parasitism and the Co-Evolution of Extended. Whole Earth Review.
    IN MANY RELIGIOUS CULTS AROUND THE world, ancestors Features are worshipped. And well they may be, for ancestors, not gods, hold..
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  34.  1
    Juan Carlos Pérez Jiménez (2001). Bruce Mazlish: The Fourth Discontinuity. The Co-Evolution of Humans and Machines. Yale University Press, New Haven y Londres, 1993. Foro Interno. Anuario de Teoría Política 1:155-156.
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  35.  2
    Iris vanRooij (2005). Barbara Gorayska and Jacob L. Mey ,Cognition and Technology: Co-Existence, Convergence and Co-Evolution. [REVIEW] Pragmatics and Cognitionpragmatics and Cognition 13 (3):647-655.
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  36.  1
    Diana Hicks (2012). One Size Doesn't Fit All: On the Co-Evolution of National Evaluation Systems and Social Science Publishing. Confero Essays on Education Philosophy and Politics 1 (1):67-90.
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  37. Philippe Beaujard (2013). Systèmes-mondes anciens. Processus de domination, de co-évolution et de résistance. L'exemple de la côte est-africaine avant le XVIIe siècle. Actuel Marx 53 (1):40.
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  38. John Hedley Brooke (2001). Stages of Thought: The Co-Evolution of Religious Thought and ScienceMichael Horace Barnes. Isis 92 (2):380-381.
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  39. 최문기 (2008). Co-Evolution of Information Society and Information Ethical Consciousness. Journal of Ethics 1 (69):215-241.
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  40. Henry Etzkowitz (2010). From Conflict to Confluence of Interest : The Co-Evolution of Academic Entrepreneurship and Intellectual Property Rights. In Thomas H. Murray & Josephine Johnston (eds.), Trust and Integrity in Biomedical Research: The Case of Financial Conflicts of Interest. Johns Hopkins University Press
  41. Steven Feld (1996). A Poetics of Place: Ecological and Aesthetic Co-Evolution in a Papua New Guinea Rainforest Community. In R. F. Ellen & Katsuyoshi Fukui (eds.), Redefining Nature: Ecology, Culture, and Domestication. Berg 61--87.
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  42. Katsuyoshi Fukui (1996). Co-Evolution Between Humans and Domesticates: The Cultural Selection of Animal Coat-Colour Diversity Among the Bodi. In R. F. Ellen & Katsuyoshi Fukui (eds.), Redefining Nature: Ecology, Culture, and Domestication. Berg 319--386.
     
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  43. Michael Mahoney (1995). The Fourth Discontinuity: The Co-Evolution of Humans and Machines by Bruce Mazlish. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 86:307-308.
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  44. Carla C. J. M. Millar, Chong-Ju Choi & Philip Y. K. Cheng (2009). Co-Evolution: Law and Institutions in International Ethics Research. Journal of Business Ethics 87 (4):455-462.
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  45. Angela B. Nelson & Richard M. Shiffrin (2013). The Co-Evolution of Knowledge and Event Memory. Psychological Review 120 (2):356-394.
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  46.  17
    Ariel D. Chipman (2010). Parallel Evolution of Segmentation by Co‐Option of Ancestral Gene Regulatory Networks. Bioessays 32 (1):60-70.
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  47.  6
    J. Landes (2014). Evolution and Rationality: Decisions, Co-Operation and Strategic Behaviour. Philosophical Quarterly 64 (255):358-361.
    This monograph is a collection of conference contributions chosen by the editors who led a three-year project on evolution, cooperation, and rationality. The collected works are held together by a six-page introduction identifying common strands and differences of positions in the different chapters. Since no two chapters have a common author, the chapters do not build on each other. Rather, they offer a variety of perspectives on a number of different aspects of rationality and evolution. The monograph thus does not (...)
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  48. Samir Okasha & Ken Binmore (eds.) (2012). Evolution and Rationality: Decisions, Co-Operation and Strategic Behaviour. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume explores from multiple perspectives the subtle and interesting relationship between the theory of rational choice and Darwinian evolution. In rational choice theory, agents are assumed to make choices that maximize their utility; in evolution, natural selection 'chooses' between phenotypes according to the criterion of fitness maximization. So there is a parallel between utility in rational choice theory and fitness in Darwinian theory. This conceptual link between fitness and utility is mirrored by the interesting parallels between formal models of (...)
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  49. Samir Okasha & Ken Binmore (eds.) (2014). Evolution and Rationality: Decisions, Co-Operation and Strategic Behaviour. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume explores from multiple perspectives the subtle and interesting relationship between the theory of rational choice and Darwinian evolution. In rational choice theory, agents are assumed to make choices that maximize their utility; in evolution, natural selection 'chooses' between phenotypes according to the criterion of fitness maximization. So there is a parallel between utility in rational choice theory and fitness in Darwinian theory. This conceptual link between fitness and utility is mirrored by the interesting parallels between formal models of (...)
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  50.  15
    Ryan Muldoon (2013). Evolution and Rationality: Decisions, Co-Operation and Strategic Behaviour, Samir Okasha and Ken Binmore (Eds.). Cambridge University Press, 2012, X + 281 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 29 (3):425-430.
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