Search results for 'cognition and life' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Mario Villalobos (2013). Autopoiesis, Life, Mind and Cognition: Bases for a Proper Naturalistic Continuity. [REVIEW] Biosemiotics 6 (3):379-391.score: 192.0
    The strong version of the life-mind continuity thesis claims that mind can be understood as an enriched version of the same functional and organizational properties of life. Contrary to this view, in this paper I argue that mental phenomena offer distinctive properties, such as intentionality or representational content, that have no counterpart in the phenomenon of life, and that must be explained by appealing to a different level of functional and organizational principles. As a strategy, and following (...)
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  2. L. Poon, David C. Rubin & B. Wilson (eds.) (1989). Everyday Cognition in Adulthood and Late Life. Cambridge University Press.score: 146.0
    Provides a firm theoretical grounding for the increasing movement of cognitive psychologists, neuropsychologists and their students beyond the laboratory, in an ...
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  3. Iván Oliva (2012). Life, cognition and culture: charting processes of self-eco-organization. Cinta de Moebio 43 (43):40-49.score: 144.0
    This paper proposes an initial epistemological course related to the notions of life, cognition, and culture from the fundamental elements of the complexity theory and, specifically, related to the notion of self-eco-organization. With these, we pretend to search isomorphic or transverse properties to all these notions; emphasizing the ideas of complexity, autonomy and dependence. El presente trabajo propone un derrotero epistemológico preliminar en torno a las nociones de vida, cognición y cultura, desde la base de algunos elementos de (...)
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  4. Murray Shanahan (2010). Embodiment and the Inner Life: Cognition and Consciousness in the Space of Possible Minds. Oxford University Press.score: 138.0
  5. Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka (ed.) (2002). Life-Truth in its Various Perspectives: Cognition, Self-Knowledge, Creativity, Scientific Research, Sharing-in-Life, Economics--. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 138.0
    What is truth? This fascinating spectrum of studies into the various rationalities of our human dealings with life - psychological, aesthetic, economic, spiritual - reveals their joints and calls for a new approach to truth. Putting both classical and contemporary conceptions aside, we find the primogenital ground of truth in the networks of correspondences, adequations, relevancies, and rationales at work in life's becoming. Does this plurivocal differentiation mean that the status of truth is relative? On the contrary, submits (...)
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  6. V. A. Ėngelʹgardt (1989). Cognition of Life Phenomena. Nauka Publishers.score: 132.0
     
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  7. Margaret Boden (2001). 2 Life and Cognition. In João Branquinho (ed.), The Foundations of Cognitive Science. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 11.score: 122.0
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  8. George Kampis (1991). Emergent Computations, Life, and Cognition. World Futures 32 (2):95-110.score: 120.0
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  9. I. T. Frolov (1990). Life and Cognition. Russian Studies in Philosophy 29 (3):6-27.score: 120.0
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  10. John Odling-Smee (2002). Complex Life: Nonmodernity and the Emergence of Cognition and Culture. By Alan Dean. Pp. 149. (Ashgate, Aldershot, 2000.) £38.50, ISBN 0-7546-1049-7, Hardback. [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science 34 (4):559-564.score: 120.0
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  11. Bernadette Tobin (1994). The Catechism of the Catholic Church and the Role of Cognition in Christian Life. Australasian Catholic Record 71 (4):411.score: 120.0
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  12. Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic (2013). Cognitive Revolution, Virtuality and Good Life. AI and Society 28 (3):319-327.score: 108.0
    We are living in an era when the focus of human relationships with the world is shifting from execution and physical impact to control and cognitive/informational interaction. This emerging, increasingly informational world is our new ecology, an infosphere that presents the grounds for a cognitive revolution based on interactions in networks of biological and artificial, intelligent agents. After the industrial revolution, which extended the human body through mechanical machinery, the cognitive revolution extends the human mind/cognition through information-processing machinery. These (...)
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  13. Tom Froese & Ezequiel A. Di Paolo (2009). Sociality and the Life–Mind Continuity Thesis. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (4):439-463.score: 104.0
    The life–mind continuity thesis holds that mind is prefigured in life and that mind belongs to life. The biggest challenge faced by proponents of this thesis is to show how an explanatory framework that accounts for basic biological processes can be systematically extended to incorporate the highest reaches of human cognition. We suggest that this apparent ‘cognitive gap’ between minimal and human forms of life appears insurmountable largely because of the methodological individualism that is prevalent (...)
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  14. Gabriel Vacariu & Mihai Vacariu (2010). Mind, Life, and Matter in the Hyperverse. University of Bucharest Publishing Company.score: 102.0
    This book is about the epistemologically different worlds (hyperverse) in relationship with the "I", the mind-body problem (Frith, Llinas), Bechtel's mechanisms, Clark's extended mind, Bickle's molecular and cellular cognition, Kauffman's life, quantum mechanics, gravity, hyperspace vs. hyperverse -/- .
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  15. Martin Pickavé & Lisa Shapiro (eds.) (2012). Emotion and Cognitive Life in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 84.0
    This volume explores emotion in medieval and early modern thought, and opens a contemporary debate on the way emotions figure in our cognitive lives.
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  16. Francis Tuerlinckx Peter Kuppens, Dominique Champagne (2012). The Dynamic Interplay Between Appraisal and Core Affect in Daily Life. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 84.0
    Appraisals and core affect are both considered central to the experience of emotion. In this study we examine the bidirectional relationships between these two components of emotional experience by examining how core affect changes following how people appraise events and how appraisals in turn change following how they feel in daily life. In an experience sampling study, participants recorded their core affect and appraisals of ongoing events; data were analyzed using cross-lagged multilevel modeling. Valence-appraisal relationships were found to be (...)
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  17. L. W. Poon (1989). What Do We Know About the Aging of Cognitive Abilities in Everyday Life. In L. Poon, David C. Rubin & B. Wilson (eds.), Everyday Cognition in Adulthood and Late Life. Cambridge University Press. 129--132.score: 84.0
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  18. Barbro Fröding (2010). Cognitive Enhancement, Virtue Ethics and the Good Life. Neuroethics 4 (3):1-12.score: 80.0
    This article explores the respective roles that medical and technological cognitive enhancements, on the one hand, and the moral and epistemic virtues traditionally understood, on the other, can play in enabling us to lead the good life. It will be shown that neither the virtues nor cognitive enhancements (of the kind we have access to today or in the foreseeable future) on their own are likely to enable most people to lead the good life. While the moral and (...)
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  19. Sofia Seinfeld, Heidi Figueroa, Jordi Ortiz-Gil & Maria V. Sanchez-Vives (2013). Effects of Music Learning and Piano Practice on Cognitive Function, Mood and Quality of Life in Older Adults. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 80.0
    Reading music and playing a musical instrument is a complex activity that comprises motor and multisensory (auditory, visual, and somatosensory) integration in a unique way. Music has also a well-known impact on the emotional state, while it can be a motivating activity. For those reasons, musical training has become a useful framework to study brain plasticity. Our aim was to study the specific effects of musical training versus the effects of other leisure activities in elderly people. With that purpose we (...)
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  20. Alexander Riegler (1992). Constructivist Artificial Life, and Beyond. In Barry McMullin (ed.), Proceedings of the workshop on autopoiesis and perception. Dublin City University: Dublin, pp. 121–136.score: 78.0
    In this paper I provide an epistemological context for Artificial Life projects. Later on, the insights which such projects will exhibit may be used as a general direction for further Artificial Life implementations. The purpose of such a model is to demonstrate by way of simulation how higher cognitive structures may emerge from building invariants by simple sensorimotor beings. By using the bottom-up methodology of Artificial Life, it is hoped to overcome problems that arise from dealing with (...)
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  21. Lucas M. Bietti (2011). Lambros Malafouris and Colin Renfrew (Eds.), The Cognitive Life of Things. Recasting the Boundaries of the Mind.. Pragmatics and Cognition 19 (1):141-149.score: 76.0
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  22. Pim Klaassen, Erik Rietveld & Julien Topal (2010). Inviting Complementary Perspectives on Situated Normativity in Everyday Life. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (1):53-73.score: 68.0
    In everyday life, situations in which we act adequately yet entirely without deliberation are ubiquitous. We use the term “situated normativity” for the normative aspect of embodied cognition in skillful action. Wittgenstein’s notion of “directed discontent” refers to a context-sensitive reaction of appreciation in skillful action. Extending this notion from the domain of expertise to that of adequate everyday action, we examine phenomenologically the question of what happens when skilled individuals act correctly with instinctive ease. This question invites (...)
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  23. Pierre Steiner & John Stewart (2009). From Autonomy to Heteronomy (and Back): The Enaction of Social Life. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (4):527-550.score: 68.0
    The term “social cognition” can be construed in different ways. On the one hand, it can refer to the cognitive faculties involved in social activities, defined simply as situations where two or more individuals interact. On this view, social systems would consist of interactions between autonomous individuals; these interactions form higher-level autonomous domains not reducible to individual actions. A contrasting, alternative view is based on a much stronger theoretical definition of a truly social domain, which is always defined by (...)
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  24. Terence E. Horgan & John L. Tienson (2006). Cognition Needs Syntax but Not Rules. In Robert J. Stainton (ed.), Contemporary Debates in Cognitive Science. Malden MA: Blackwell Publishing. 147--158.score: 68.0
    Human cognition is rich, varied, and complex. In this Chapter we argue that because of the richness of human cognition (and human mental life generally), there must be a syntax of cognitive states, but because of this very richness, cognitive processes cannot be describable by exceptionless rules. The argument for syntax, in Section 1, has to do with being able to get around in any number of possible environments in a complex world. Since nature did not know (...)
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  25. David Moreau (forthcoming). Unreflective Actions? Complex Motor Skill Acquisition to Enhance Spatial Cognition. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-11.score: 68.0
    Cognitive science has recently moved toward action-integrated paradigms to account for some of its most remarkable findings. This novel approach has opened up new venues for the sport sciences. In particular, a large body of literature has investigated the relationship between complex motor practice and cognition, which in the sports domain has mostly concerned the effect of imagery and other forms of mental practice on motor skill acquisition and emotional control. Yet recent evidence indicates that this relationship is bidirectional: (...)
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  26. Erik Rietveld (2008). Situated Normativity: The Normative Aspect of Embodied Cognition in Unreflective Action. Mind 117 (468):973-1001.score: 66.0
    In everyday life we often act adequately, yet without deliberation. For instance, we immediately obtain and maintain an appropriate distance from others in an elevator. The notion of normativity implied here is a very basic one, namely distinguishing adequate from inadequate, correct from incorrect, or better from worse in the context of a particular situation. In the first part of this paper I investigate such ‘situated normativity’ by focusing on unreflective expert action. More particularly, I use Wittgenstein’s examples of (...)
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  27. William D. Casebeer & Patricia S. Churchland (2003). The Neural Mechanisms of Moral Cognition: A Multiple-Aspect Approach to Moral Judgment and Decision-Making. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 18 (1):169-194.score: 66.0
    We critically review themushrooming literature addressing the neuralmechanisms of moral cognition (NMMC), reachingthe following broad conclusions: (1) researchmainly focuses on three inter-relatedcategories: the moral emotions, moral socialcognition, and abstract moral reasoning. (2)Research varies in terms of whether it deploysecologically valid or experimentallysimplified conceptions of moral cognition. Themore ecologically valid the experimentalregime, the broader the brain areas involved.(3) Much of the research depends on simplifyingassumptions about the domain of moral reasoningthat are motivated by the need to makeexperimental progress. This (...)
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  28. Patricia Churchland (2003). The Neural Mechanisms of Moral Cognition: A Multiple-Aspect Approach to Moral Judgment and Decision-Making. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 18 (1):169-194.score: 66.0
    We critically review themushrooming literature addressing the neuralmechanisms of moral cognition (NMMC), reachingthe following broad conclusions: (1) researchmainly focuses on three inter-relatedcategories: the moral emotions, moral socialcognition, and abstract moral reasoning. (2)Research varies in terms of whether it deploysecologically valid or experimentallysimplified conceptions of moral cognition. Themore ecologically valid the experimentalregime, the broader the brain areas involved.(3) Much of the research depends on simplifyingassumptions about the domain of moral reasoningthat are motivated by the need to makeexperimental progress. This (...)
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  29. Michael Tomasello, Malinda Carpenter, Josep Call, Tanya Behne & Henrike Moll (2005). Understanding and Sharing Intentions: The Origins of Cultural Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (5):675-691.score: 66.0
    We propose that the crucial difference between human cognition and that of other species is the ability to participate with others in collaborative activities with shared goals and intentions: shared intentionality. Participation in such activities requires not only especially powerful forms of intention reading and cultural learning, but also a unique motivation to share psychological states with others and unique forms of cognitive representation for doing so. The result of participating in these activities is species-unique forms of cultural (...) and evolution, enabling everything from the creation and use of linguistic symbols to the construction of social norms and individual beliefs to the establishment of social institutions. In support of this proposal we argue and present evidence that great apes (and some children with autism) understand the basics of intentional action, but they still do not participate in activities involving joint intentions and attention (shared intentionality). Human children's skills of shared intentionality develop gradually during the first 14 months of life as two ontogenetic pathways intertwine: (1) the general ape line of understanding others as animate, goal-directed, and intentional agents; and (2) a species-unique motivation to share emotions, experience, and activities with other persons. The developmental outcome is children's ability to construct dialogic cognitive representations, which enable them to participate in earnest in the collectivity that is human cognition. Key Words: collaboration; cooperation; cultural learning; culture; evolutionary psychology; intentions; shared intentionality; social cognition; social learning; theory of mind; joint attention. (shrink)
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  30. Benjamin Capps (2011). Libertarianism, Legitimation, and the Problems of Regulating Cognition-Enhancing Drugs. Neuroethics 4 (2):119-128.score: 66.0
    Some libertarians tend to advocate the wide availability of cognition-enhancing drugs beyond their current prescription-only status. They suggest that certain kinds of drugs can be a component of a prudential conception of the ‘good life’—they enhance our opportunities and preferences; and therefore, if a person freely chooses to use them, then there is no justification for the kind of prejudicial, authoritative restrictions that are currently deployed in public policy. In particular, this libertarian idea signifies that if enhancements are (...)
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  31. Vivian Bohl & Wouter van den Bos (2012). Toward an Integrative Account of Social Cognition: Marrying Theory of Mind and Interactionism to Study the Interplay of Type 1 and Type 2 Processes. [REVIEW] Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 66.0
    Traditional theory of mind (ToM) accounts for social cognition have been at the basis of most studies in the social cognitive neurosciences. However, in recent years, the need to go beyond traditional ToM accounts for understanding real life social interactions has become all the more pressing. At the same time it remains unclear whether alternative accounts, such as interactionism, can yield a sufficient description and explanation of social interactions. We argue that instead of considering ToM and interactionism as (...)
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  32. Aiyana K. Willard & Ara Norenzayan (2013). Cognitive Biases Explain Religious Belief, Paranormal Belief, and Belief in Life's Purpose. Cognition 129 (2):379-391.score: 66.0
  33. Victoria A. Braithwaite, Felicity Huntingford & Ruud den Bos (2013). Variation in Emotion and Cognition Among Fishes. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (1):7-23.score: 66.0
    Increasing public concern for the welfare of fish species that human beings use and exploit has highlighted the need for better understanding of the cognitive status of fish and of their ability to experience negative emotions such as pain and fear. Moreover, studying emotion and cognition in fish species broadens our scientific understanding of how emotion and cognition are represented in the central nervous system and what kind of role they play in the organization of behavior. For instance, (...)
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  34. Merlin Donald (1993). Précis of Origins of the Modern Mind: Three Stages in the Evolution of Culture and Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (4):737-748.score: 66.0
    This bold and brilliant book asks the ultimate question of the life sciences: How did the human mind acquire its incomparable power? In seeking the answer, Merlin Donald traces the evolution of human culture and cognition from primitive apes to the era of artificial intelligence, and presents an original theory of how the human mind evolved from its presymbolic form. In the emergence of modern human culture, Donald proposes, there were three radical transitions. During the first, our bipedal (...)
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  35. Anne-Wil Kruijt, Peter Putman & Willem Van der Does (forthcoming). The 5-HTTLPR Polymorphism, Early and Recent Life Stress, and Cognitive Endophenotypes of Depression. Cognition and Emotion:1-15.score: 66.0
  36. V. Hari Narayanan (forthcoming). Embodied Cognition and the Orwell's Problem in Cognitive Science. AI and Society:1-5.score: 66.0
    Embodied approach to cognition has taken roots in cognitive studies with developments in diverse fields such as robotics, artificial life and cognitive linguistics. Taking cue from the metaphor of a Watt governor, this approach stresses on the coupling between the organism and the environment and the continuous nature of the cognitive processes. This results in questioning the viability of computational–representational understanding of mind as a comprehensive theory of cognition. The paper, after giving an overview of embodied approach (...)
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  37. Mark J. Bliton & Stuart G. Finder (2002). Traversing Boundaries: Clinical Ethics, Moral Experience, and the Withdrawal of Life Supports. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (3):233-258.score: 66.0
    While many have suggested that to withdraw medical interventions is ethically equivalent to withholding them, the moral complexity of actually withdrawing life supportive interventions from a patient cannot be ignored. Utilizing interplay between expository and narrative styles, and drawing upon our experiences with patients, families, nurses, and physicians when life supports have been withdrawn, we explore the changeable character of boundaries in end-of-life situations. We consider ways in which boundaries imply differences – for example, between cognition (...)
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  38. Victoria A. Braithwaite, Felicity Huntingford & Ruud van den Bos (2013). Variation in Emotion and Cognition Among Fishes. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (1):7-23.score: 66.0
    Increasing public concern for the welfare of fish species that human beings use and exploit has highlighted the need for better understanding of the cognitive status of fish and of their ability to experience negative emotions such as pain and fear. Moreover, studying emotion and cognition in fish species broadens our scientific understanding of how emotion and cognition are represented in the central nervous system and what kind of role they play in the organization of behavior. For instance, (...)
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  39. Sidney D'Mello & Art Graesser (2011). The Half-Life of Cognitive-Affective States During Complex Learning. Cognition and Emotion 25 (7):1299-1308.score: 66.0
  40. A. Carlo Altamura Elisabetta Caletti, Riccardo A. Paoli, Alessio Fiorentini, Michela Cigliobianco, Elisa Zugno, Marta Serati, Giulia Orsenigo, Paolo Grillo, Stefano Zago, Alice Caldiroli, Cecilia Prunas, Francesca Giusti, Dario Consonni (2013). Neuropsychology, Social Cognition and Global Functioning Among Bipolar, Schizophrenic Patients and Healthy Controls: Preliminary Data. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 66.0
    This study aimed to determine the extent of impairment in social and non-social cognitive domains in an ecological context comparing bipolar (BD), schizophrenic patients (SKZ) and healthy controls (HC). The sample was enrolled at the Department of Psychiatry of Policlinico Hospital, University of Milan, it includes stabilized schizophrenic patients (n = 30), euthymic bipolar patients (n = 18) and healthy controls (n = 18). Patients and controls completed psychiatric assessment rating scales, the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS) (...)
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  41. Liz Stillwaggon Swan & Louis J. Goldberg (2010). Biosymbols: Symbols in Life and Mind. [REVIEW] Biosemiotics 3 (1):17-31.score: 66.0
    The strong continuity thesis postulates that the properties of mind are an enriched version of the properties of life, and thus that life and mind differ in degree and not kind. A philosophical problem for this view is the ostensive discontinuity between humans and other animals in virtue of our use of symbols—particularly the presumption that the symbolic nature of human cognition bears no relation to the basic properties of life. In this paper, we make the (...)
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  42. Fernand Vandamme (2004). Gandhi and Knowledge Management: Or a Life Cycle Approach to Cognitive Politicology and Cognitive Management: Gandhi and Knowledge Management. Communication and Cognition. Monographies 37 (1-2):45-57.score: 66.0
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  43. William S. Robinson (1999). Representation and Cognitive Explanation. In Understanding Representation in the Cognitive Sciences: Does Representation Need Reality, Riegler. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Pub.score: 60.0
     
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  44. B. Hanna-Pladdy & B. Gajewski (2011). Recent and Past Musical Activity Predicts Cognitive Aging Variability: Direct Comparison with General Lifestyle Activities. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:198-198.score: 58.0
    Studies evaluating the impact of modifiable lifestyle factors on cognition offer potential insights into sources of cognitive aging variability. Recently, we reported an association between extent of musical instrumental practice throughout the life span (greater than 10 years) on preserved cognitive functioning in advanced age . These findings raise the question of whether there are training-induced brain changes in musicians that can transfer to nonmusical cognitive abilities to allow for compensation of age-related cognitive declines. However, because of the (...)
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  45. Barbro Elisabeth Esmeralda Fröding (2011). Cognitive Enhancement, Virtue Ethics and the Good Life. Neuroethics 4 (3):223-234.score: 56.0
  46. Ruben Berrios, Anti-Realism and Aesthetic Cognition.score: 54.0
    Ruben Berrios Queen’s University Belfast Anti-realism and Aesthetic Cognition Abstract At the core of the debate between scientific realism and anti-realism is the question of the relation between scientific theory and the world. The realist possesses a mimetic conception of the relation between theory and reality. For the realist, scientific theories represent reality. The anti-realist, in contrast, seeks to understand the relations between theory and world in non-mimetic terms. We will examine Cartwright’s simulacrum account of explanation in order to (...)
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  47. Gordana Dodig Crnkovic & Mark Burgin (eds.) (forthcoming). INFORMATION AND COMPUTATION. World Scientific.score: 54.0
    The book focuses on relations between information and computation. Information is a basic structure of the world, while computation is a process of the dynamic change of information. In order for anything to exist for an individual, the individual must get information on it, either by means of perception or by re-organization of the existing information into new patterns and networks in the brain. With the advent of World Wide Web and a prospect of semantic web, the ways of information (...)
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  48. Ezequiel Di Paolo (2009). Extended Life. Topoi 28 (1):9-21.score: 54.0
    This paper reformulates some of the questions raised by extended mind theorists from an enactive, life/mind continuity perspective. Because of its reliance on concepts such as autopoiesis, the enactive approach has been deemed internalist and thus incompatible with the extended mind hypothesis. This paper answers this criticism by showing (1) that the relation between organism and cogniser is not one of co-extension, (2) that cognition is a relational phenomenon and thereby has no location, and (3) that the individuality (...)
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  49. Liam P. Dempsey & Itay Shani (2013). Stressing the Flesh: In Defense of Strong Embodied Cognition. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (3):590-617.score: 54.0
    In a recent paper, Andy Clark (2008) has argued that the literature on embodied cognition reveals a tension between two prominent strands within this movement. On the one hand, there are those who endorse what Clark refers to as body-centrism, a view which emphasizes the special contribution made by the body to a creature’s mental life. Among other things, body centrism implies that significant differences in embodiment translate into significant differences in cognition and consciousness. On the other (...)
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  50. A. R. (2003). The Cognition-Knowledge Distinction in Kant and Dilthey and the Implications for Psychology and Self-Understanding. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 34 (1):149-164.score: 54.0
    Both Kant and Dilthey distinguish between cognition and knowledge, but they do so differently in accordance with their respective theoretical interests. Kant's primary cognitive interest is in the natural sciences, and from this perspective the status of psychology is questioned because its phenomena are not mathematically measurable. Dilthey, by contrast, reconceives psychology as a human science.For Kant, knowledge is conceptual cognition that has attained certainty by being part of a rational system. Dilthey also links knowledge with certainty; however, (...)
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