Search results for 'cognitive gap' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  9
    Tobias Matzner (2016). The Model Gap: Cognitive Systems in Security Applications and Their Ethical Implications. [REVIEW] AI and Society 31 (1):95-102.
    The use of cognitive systems like pattern recognition or video tracking technology in security applications is becoming ever more common. The paper considers cases in which the cognitive systems are meant to assist human tasks by providing information, but the final decision is left to the human. All these systems and their various applications have a common feature: an intrinsic difference in how a situation or an event is assessed by a human being and a cognitive system. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  43
    Hermann G. W. Burchard (2014). The Cognitive Gap, Neural Darwinism & Linguistic Dualism —Russell, Husserl, Heidegger & Quine. Open Journal of Philosophy 4 (3):244-264.
    Guided by key insights of the four great philosophers mentioned in the title, here, in review of and expanding on our earlier work (Burchard, 2005, 2011), we present an exposition of the role played by language, & in the broader sense, λογοζ, the Logos, in how the CNS, the brain, is running the human being. Evolution by neural Darwinism has been forcing the linguistic nature of mind, enabling it to overcome & exploit the cognitive gap between an animal and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  3.  59
    Peter Fazekas (2011). Cognitive Architecture and the Epistemic Gap: Defending Physicalism Without Phenomenal Concepts. Philosophia 39 (1):21-29.
    The novel approach presented in this paper accounts for the occurrence of the epistemic gap and defends physicalism against anti-physicalist arguments without relying on so-called phenomenal concepts. Instead of concentrating on conceptual features, the focus is shifted to the special characteristics of experiences themselves. To this extent, the account provided is an alternative to the Phenomenal Concept Strategy. It is argued that certain sensory representations, as accessed by higher cognition, lack constituent structure. Unstructured representations could freely exchange their causal roles (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  4. Michael Tye (1999). Phenomenal Consciousness: The Explanatory Gap as a Cognitive Illusion. Mind 108 (432):705-25.
    The thesis that there is a troublesome explanatory gap between the phenomenal aspects of experiences and the underlying physical and functional states is given a number of different interpretations. It is shown that, on each of these interpretations, the thesis is false. In supposing otherwise, philosophers have fallen prey to a cognitive illusion, induced largely by a failure to recognize the special character of phenomenal concepts.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   28 citations  
  5.  56
    Alistair Isaac & Jakub Szymanik (2010). Logic in Cognitive Science: Bridging the Gap Between Symbolic and Connectionist Paradigms. Journal of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research (2):279-309.
    This paper surveys applications of logical methods in the cognitive sciences. Special attention is paid to non-monotonic logics and complexity theory. We argue that these particular tools have been useful in clarifying the debate between symbolic and connectionist models of cognition.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  19
    Tom Schonberg, Craig R. Fox & Russell A. Poldrack (2011). Mind the Gap: Bridging Economic and Naturalistic Risk-Taking with Cognitive Neuroscience. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (1):11.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  7.  7
    Andrea Bender, Sieghard Beller, Giovanni Bennardo, James S. Boster, Asifa Majid & Douglas L. Medin (2010). Bridging the Gap: From Cognitive Anthropology to Cognitive Science. In S. Ohlsson & R. Catrambone (eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society
  8.  10
    Denis Mareschal & Thomas R. Shultz (1997). From Neural Constructivism to Children's Cognitive Development: Bridging the Gap. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):571-572.
    Missing from Quartz & Sejnowski's (Q&S's) unique and valuable effort to relate cognitive development to neural constructivism is an examination of the global emergent properties of adding new neural circuits. Such emergent properties can be studied with computational models. Modeling with generative connectionist networks shows that synaptogenic mechanisms can account for progressive increases in children's representational power.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  8
    Claire Petitmengin, Anne Remillieux, Béatrice Cahour & Shirley Carter-Thomas (2013). A Gap in Nisbett and Wilson's Findings? A First-Person Access to Our Cognitive Processes. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (2):654-669.
    The well-known experiments of Nisbett and Wilson lead to the conclusion that we have no introspective access to our decision-making processes. Johansson et al. have recently developed an original protocol consisting in manipulating covertly the relationship between the subjects’ intended choice and the outcome they were presented with: in 79.6% of cases, they do not detect the manipulation and provide an explanation of the choice they did not make, confirming the findings of Nisbett and Wilson. We have reproduced this protocol, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  10. L. R. Albert (2002). Bridging the Achievement Gap in Mathematics: Socio-Cultural Historic Theory and Dynamic Cognitive Assessment. Journal of Thought 37 (4):65-82.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Sebastian Sattler & Ilina Singh (2016). Cognitive Enhancement in Healthy Children Will Not Close the Achievement Gap in Education. American Journal of Bioethics 16 (6):39-41.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Leon De Bruin & Sanneke De Haan (2012). Enactivism and Social Cognition: In Search for the Whole Story. Journal of Cognitive Semiotics (1):225-250.
    Although the enactive approach has been very successful in explaining many basic social interactions in terms of embodied practices, there is still much work to be done when it comes to higher forms of social cognition. In this article, we discuss and evaluate two recent proposals by Shaun Gallagher and Daniel Hutto that try to bridge this ‘cognitive gap’ by appealing to the notion of narrative practice. Although we are enthusiastic about these proposals, we argue that (i) it is (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  13.  79
    Leon de Bruin & Lena Kästner (2012). Dynamic Embodied Cognition. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (4):541-563.
    Abstract In this article, we investigate the merits of an enactive view of cognition for the contemporary debate about social cognition. If enactivism is to be a genuine alternative to classic cognitivism, it should be able to bridge the “cognitive gap”, i.e. provide us with a convincing account of those higher forms of cognition that have traditionally been the focus of its cognitivist opponents. We show that, when it comes to social cognition, current articulations of enactivism are—despite their celebrated (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  14.  74
    Richard Heersmink (forthcoming). Extended Mind and Cognitive Enhancement: Moral Aspects of Cognitive Artifacts. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-16.
    This article connects philosophical debates about cognitive enhancement and situated cognition. It does so by focusing on moral aspects of enhancing our cognitive abilities with the aid of external artifacts. Such artifacts have important moral dimensions that are addressed neither by (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  82
    Antoni Gomila & Vincent C. Müller (2012). Challenges for Artificial Cognitive Systems. Journal of Cognitive Science 13 (4):452-469.
    The declared goal of this paper is to fill this gap: “... cognitive systems research needs questions or challenges that define progress. The challenges are not (yet more) predictions of the future, but a guideline to what are the aims and what would constitute progress.” – the quotation being from the project description of EUCogII, the project for the European Network for Cognitive Systems within which this formulation of the ‘challenges’ was originally developed (http://www.eucognition.org). So, we stick out (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Cleotilde Gonzalez, Noam Ben‐Asher, Jolie M. Martin & Varun Dutt (2015). A Cognitive Model of Dynamic Cooperation With Varied Interdependency Information. Cognitive Science 39 (3):457-495.
    We analyze the dynamics of repeated interaction of two players in the Prisoner's Dilemma under various levels of interdependency information and propose an instance-based learning cognitive model to explain how cooperation emerges over time. Six hypotheses are tested regarding how a player accounts for an opponent's outcomes: the selfish hypothesis suggests ignoring information about the opponent and utilizing only the player's own outcomes; the extreme fairness hypothesis weighs the player's own and the opponent's outcomes equally; the moderate fairness hypothesis (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17. Marc Bekoff (1997). Deep Ethology, Animal Rights, and the Great Ape/Animal Project: Resisting Speciesism and Expanding the Community of Equals. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 10 (3):269-296.
    In this essay I argue that the evolutionary and comparative study of nonhuman animal (hereafter animal) cognition in a wide range of taxa by cognitive ethologists can readily inform discussions about animal protection and animal rights. However, while it is clear that there is a link between animal cognitive abilities and animal pain and suffering, I agree with Jeremy Bentham who claimed long ago the real question does not deal with whether individuals can think or reason but rather (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  18. Hanne De Jaegher & Tom Froese (2009). On the Role of Social Interaction in Individual Agency. Adaptive Behavior 17 (5):444-460.
    Is an individual agent constitutive of or constituted by its social interactions? This question is typically not asked in the cognitive sciences, so strong is the consensus that only individual agents have constitutive efficacy. In this article we challenge this methodological solipsism and argue that interindividual relations and social context do not simply arise from the behavior of individual agents, but themselves enable and shape the individual agents on which they depend. For this, we define the notion of autonomy (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  19. Nicholas S. Fitz, Roland Nadler, Praveena Manogaran, Eugene W. J. Chong & Peter B. Reiner (2014). Public Attitudes Toward Cognitive Enhancement. Neuroethics 7 (2):173-188.
    Vigorous debate over the moral propriety of cognitive enhancement exists, but the views of the public have been largely absent from the discussion. To address this gap in our knowledge, four experiments were carried out with contrastive vignettes in order to obtain quantitative data on public attitudes towards cognitive enhancement. The data collected suggest that the public is sensitive to and capable of understanding the four cardinal concerns identified by neuroethicists, and tend to cautiously accept cognitive (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  20. Peter Fazekas & Zoltán Jakab, Sensory Representation and Cognitive Architecture: An Alternative to Phenomenal Concepts.
    We present a cognitive-physicalist account of phenomenal consciousness. We argue that phenomenal concepts do not differ from other types of concepts. When explaining the peculiarities of conscious experience, the right place to look at is sensory/ perceptual representations and their interaction with general conceptual structures. We utilize Jerry Fodor’s psycho- semantic theory to formulate our view. We compare and contrast our view with that of Murat Aydede and Güven Güzeldere, who, using Dretskean psychosemantic theory, arrived at a solution different (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  47
    Sujata Ghosh, Ben Meijering & Rineke Verbrugge (2014). Strategic Reasoning: Building Cognitive Models From Logical Formulas. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 23 (1):1-29.
    This paper presents an attempt to bridge the gap between logical and cognitive treatments of strategic reasoning in games. There have been extensive formal debates about the merits of the principle of backward induction among game theorists and logicians. Experimental economists and psychologists have shown that human subjects, perhaps due to their bounded resources, do not always follow the backward induction strategy, leading to unexpected outcomes. Recently, based on an eye-tracking study, it has turned out that even human subjects (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  59
    Jay F. Rosenberg (1994). Comments on Bechtel, Levels of Description and Explanation in Cognitive Science. Minds and Machines 4 (1):27-37.
    I begin by tracing some of the confusions regarding levels and reduction to a failure to distinguish two different principles according to which theories can be viewed as hierarchically arranged — epistemic authority and ontological constitution. I then argue that the notion of levels relevant to the debate between symbolic and connectionist paradigms of mental activity answers to neither of these models, but is rather correlative to the hierarchy of functional decompositions of cognitive tasks characteristic of homuncular functionalism. Finally, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Ned Block & Robert Stalnaker (1999). Conceptual Analysis, Dualism, and the Explanatory Gap. Philosophical Review 108 (1):1-46.
    The explanatory gap . Consciousness is a mystery. No one has ever given an account, even a highly speculative, hypothetical, and incomplete account of how a physical thing could have phenomenal states. Suppose that consciousness is identical to a property of the brain, say activity in the pyramidal cells of layer 5 of the cortex involving reverberatory circuits from cortical layer 6 to the thalamus and back to layers 4 and 6,as Crick and Koch have suggested for visual consciousness. .) (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   115 citations  
  24.  21
    William E. Morris & Robert C. Richardson (1995). How Not to Demarcate Cognitive Science and Folk Psychology: A Response to Pickering and Chater. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 5 (3):339-355.
    Pickering and Chater (P&C) maintain that folk psychology and cognitive science should neither compete nor cooperate. Each is an independent enterprise, with a distinct subject matter and characteristic modes of explanation. P&C''s case depends upon their characterizations of cognitive science and folk psychology. We question the basis for their characterizations, challenge both the coherence and the individual adequacy of their contrasts between the two, and show that they waver in their views about the scope of each. We conclude (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  10
    Andrea Bender, Dirk Schlimm & Sieghard Beller (2015). The Cognitive Advantages of Counting Specifically: A Representational Analysis of Verbal Numeration Systems in Oceanic Languages. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (4):552-569.
    The domain of numbers provides a paradigmatic case for investigating interactions of culture, language, and cognition: Numerical competencies are considered a core domain of knowledge, and yet the development of specifically human abilities presupposes cultural and linguistic input by way of counting sequences. These sequences constitute systems with distinct structural properties, the cross-linguistic variability of which has implications for number representation and processing. Such representational effects are scrutinized for two types of verbal numeration systems—general and object-specific ones—that were in parallel (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  61
    Tom McClelland (2016). Gappiness and the Case for Liberalism About Phenomenal Properties. Philosophical Quarterly:NA.
    Conservatives claim that all phenomenal properties are sensory. Liberals countenance non-sensory phenomenal properties such as what it’s like to perceive some high-level property, and what it’s like to think that p. A hallmark of phenomenal properties is that they present an explanatory gap, so to resolve the dispute we should consider whether experience has non-sensory properties that appear ‘gappy’. The classic tests for ‘gappiness’ are the invertibility test and the zombifiability test. I suggest that these tests yield conflicting results: non-sensory (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  8
    M. D. Kirchhoff & D. D. Hutto (2016). Never Mind the Gap: Neurophenomenology, Radical Enactivism, and the Hard Problem of Consciousness. Constructivist Foundations 11 (2):346-353.
    Context: Neurophenomenology, as formulated by Varela, offers an approach to the science of consciousness that seeks to get beyond the hard problem of consciousness. There is much to admire in the practical approach to the science of consciousness that neurophenomenology advocates. Problem: Even so, this article argues, the metaphysical commitments of the enterprise require a firmer foundation. The root problem is that neurophenomenology, as classically formulated by Varela, endorses a form of non-reductionism that, despite its ambitions, assumes rather than dissolves (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Brian Fiala, Adam Arico & Shaun Nichols (2011). On the Psychological Origins of Dualism: Dual-Process Cognition and the Explanatory Gap. In Edward Slingerland & Mark Collard (eds.), Creating Consilience: Issues and Case Studies in teh Integration of the Sciences and Humanities. OUP
    Consciousness often presents itself as a problem for materialists because no matter which physical explanation we consider, there seems to remain something about conscious experience that hasn't been fully explained. This gives rise to an apparent explanatory gap. The explanatory gulf between the physical and the conscious is reflected in the broader population, in which dualistic intuitions abound. Drawing on recent empirical evidence, this essay presents a dual-process cognitive model of consciousness attribution. This dual-process model, we suggest, provides an (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  29.  10
    Torsten Marcus Breden & Jochen Vollmann (2004). The Cognitive Based Approach of Capacity Assessment in Psychiatry: A Philosophical Critique of the MacCAT-T. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 12 (4):273-283.
    This article gives a brief introduction to the MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool-Treatment (MacCAT-T) and critically examines its theoretical presuppositions. On the basis of empirical, methodological and ethical critique it is emphasised that the cognitive bias that underlies the MacCAT-T assessment needs to be modified. On the one hand it has to be admitted that the operationalisation of competence in terms of value-free categories, e.g. rational decision abilities, guarantees objectivity to a great extent; but on the other hand it bears (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  30. Peter Carruthers (2002). Human Creativity: Its Cognitive Basis, its Evolution, and its Connections with Childhood Pretence. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 53 (2):225-249.
    This paper defends two initial claims. First, it argues that essentially the same cognitive resources are shared by adult creative thinking and problem-solving, on the one hand, and by childhood pretend play, on the other—namely, capacities to generate and to reason with suppositions (or imagined possibilities). Second, it argues that the evolutionary function of childhood pretence is to practice and enhance adult forms of creativity. The paper goes on to show how these proposals can provide a smooth and evolutionarily-plausible (...)
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  31.  20
    Thomas W. Clark (1995). Function and Phenomenology: Closing the Explanatory Gap. Journal of Consciousness Studies 2 (3):241-54.
    This paper critiques the view that consciousness is likely something extra which accompanies or is produced by neural states, something beyond the functional cognitive processes realized in the brain. Such a view creates the `explanatory gap'between function and nomenology which many suppose cannot be filled by functionalist theories of mind. Given methodological considerations of simplicity, ontological parsimony, and theoretical conservatism, an alternative hypothesis is recommended, that subjective qualitative experience is identical to certain information-bearing, behaviour-controlling functions, not something which emerges (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  20
    Andreas Gregersen (2014). Generic Structures, Generic Experiences: A Cognitive Experientialist Approach to Video Game Analysis. Philosophy and Technology 27 (2):159-175.
    The article discusses the issue of how to categorize video games—not the medium of video games, but individual video games. As a lead in to this discussion, the article discusses video game specificity and genericity and moves on to genre theory. On the basis of this discussion, a cognitive experientialist genre framework is sketched, which incorporates both general points from genre theory and theories more specific to the video game domain. The framework is illustrated through a brief example. One (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. James Bennett-Levy, Gillian Butler, Melanie Fennell, Ann Hackmann, Martina Mueller & David Westbrook (eds.) (2004). Oxford Guide to Behavioural Experiments in Cognitive Therapy. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Behavioural experiments are one of the central and most powerful methods of intervention in cognitive therapy. Yet until now, there has been no volume specifically dedicated to guiding physicians who wish to design and implement behavioural experiments across a wide range of clinical problems.The Oxford Guide to Behavioural Experiments in Cognitive Therapy fills this gap. It is written by clinicians for clinicians. It is a practical, easy to read handbook, which is relevant for practising clinicians at every level, (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  34.  6
    Gerhard Minnameier (2001). A New "Stairway to Moral Heaven"? A Systematic Reconstruction of Stages of Moral Thinking Based on a Piagetian "Logic" of Cognitive Development. Journal of Moral Education 30 (4):317-337.
    One of the main deficiencies of the Kohlberg theory is that it has never lived up to the claim of being a structural developmental theory. First of all, it has never been shown, what specific problems arise at each stage and how these are resolved at the following one (integrating all lower stages). The present approach tries to fill this gap by starting from an elaborated developmental logic, which is then applied to the field of moral thinking. Thus, stages are (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  35.  14
    Peter Fazekas, Tagging the World : Descrying Consciousness in Cognitive Processes.
    Although having conscious experiences is a fundamental feature of our everyday life, our understanding of what consciousness is is very limited. According to one of the main conclusions of contemporary philosophy of mind, the qualitative aspect of consciousness seems to resist functionalisation, i.e. it cannot be adequately defined solely in terms of functional or causal roles, which leads to an epistemic gap between phenomenal and scientific knowledge. Phenomenal qualities, then, seem to be, in principle, unexplainable in scientific terms. As a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  8
    Winfried D'Avis (1998). Theoretische Lücken der Cognitive Science. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 29 (1):37-57.
    Theoretical gaps of the cognitive science. First of all the gap-thesis is based on a criticism 1. of the computer-orientated cognitive science (it confuses information with the information carrier), 2. of connectivism (its linguistic borrowing from the neurobiology is not appropriate), 3. of Varelas production model (the elimination of the function of representation results in the loss of the cognitive ability). From the context of meaning and time, then the author sketches a cognitive theoretical approach, in (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  9
    Niklas Bornhauser & Rudi Wagner (2012). Problems and perspectives concerning the human conjectural conceptions in cognitive - behavioral therapy. Cinta de Moebio 44 (44):106-121.
    Nowadays psychology as a scientific discourse and a positive practice finds itself in an epistemologically critical situation. The analysis of the actual state of the academic discussion in cognitive-behavioural psychology, the most representative and widespread theoretical-practical trend in European nations, reveals that it frequently is misunderstood as a exclusively technical proceeding, an amount of deficiently articulated operatory interventions, alienated from its underlying anthropological assumptions. This paper proposes to exam how far the gap between theoretical reflection and effective practice, a (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  1
    Kyungrae Kim (forthcoming). Avīci Hell and Wújiān in the Cognitive Process: Observations on Some Technical Terms in the Jié Tuō Dào Lùn. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-18.
    The text Jié tuō dào lùn, or Chinese translation of *Vimuttimagga mentions the Avīci Hell all of a sudden in the section on the cognitive process. The problematic phrase wújiān shēng Āpídìyù has been interpreted in different ways by several scholars. Japanese scholars tend to skip the phrase, or regard the term Āpídìyù as a typographic error. Given that we do not have an original text, however, the phrase needs to be understood as it is. In contrast, the English (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  3
    Jack Dowie (1996). The Research-Practice Gap and the Role of Decision Analysis in Closing It. Health Care Analysis 4 (1):5-18.
    Current hypotheses for the existence of the ‘research-practice gap’ focus on weaknesses in research dissemination on the one hand and practitioner attitudes and motivations on the other. It is suggested that the gap has more fundamental origins in the cognitive and value mismatch between researchers and practitioners. To narrow the gap both cultures need to use a common framework (map and language) that is located at a level of analysis between their typical modes and makes explicit provision for the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  2
    Alfredo Pereira Jr, Maria AliceOrnellas Pereira & FábioAugusto Furlan (2011). Recent Advances in Brain Physiology and Cognitive Processing. Mens Sana Monographs 9 (1):183.
    The discovery of participation of astrocytes as active elements in glutamatergic tripartite synapses (composed by functional units of two neurons and one astrocyte) has led to the construction of models of cognitive functioning in the human brain, focusing on associative learning, sensory integration, conscious processing and memory formation/retrieval. We have modelled human cognitive functions by means of an ensemble of functional units (tripartite synapses) connected by gap junctions that link distributed astrocytes, allowing the formation of intra- and intercellular (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  2
    Richard M. Gale (2005). The Cognitive Pragmatism of Nicholas Rescher. Contemporary Pragmatism 2 (2):1-7.
    In Cognitive Pragmatism Nicholas Rescher attempts to lay to rest the perennial problem concerning the epistemic gap between what is directly given to us and the reality-claims that we base upon this. It is found that he offers many different candidates for what is this mental middleman that stands between us and reality, and that none of them is above suspicion. His resolution of the epistemic gap problem is, in effect, a dogmatic rejection of the meaningfulness of the philosophical (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Aaron Ben-Zeev (1981). Perception as a Cognitive System. Dissertation, The University of Chicago
    In this work I reject the contention that there is a perceptual stage which is devoid of contributions from the agent's cognitive framework. This contention is expressed in two different noncognitive views of perception. The traditional sensory core view which has prevailed since the seventeenth century; it claims that there is a stage of pure sensory core which precedes the interpretive percepts . The recent ecological approach whose main representative is J. J. Gibson; it claims that not only a (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Stavroula N. Glezakos (2003). The Cognitive Value of Language. Dissertation, University of California, Los Angeles
    The central question that I address in this dissertation is: how should we explain our connection with the language that we use? I show that the way that one answers the question depends upon the characterization that one gives of the nature of language. ;I argue that philosophers of language who theorize about words as in-the-world entities with a history have largely failed to explain how we use such words. To fill in this gap, I offer a positive account of (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  58
    Bénédicte Veillet (2015). The Cognitive Significance of Phenomenal Knowledge. Philosophical Studies 172 (11):2955-2974.
    Knowledge of what it’s like to have perceptual experiences, e.g. of what it’s like to see red or taste Turkish coffee, is phenomenal knowledge; and it is knowledge the substantial or significant nature of which is widely assumed to pose a challenge for physicalism. Call this the New Challenge to physicalism. The goal of this paper is to take a closer look at the New Challenge. I show, first, that it is surprisingly difficult to spell out clearly and neutrally what (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  45. Timothy J. Bayne (2004). Closing the Gap: Some Questions for Neurophenomenology. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3 (4):349-64.
    In his 1996 paper Neurophenomenology: A methodological remedy for the hard problem, Francisco Varela called for a union of Husserlian phenomenology and cognitive science. Varela''s call hasn''t gone unanswered, and recent years have seen the development of a small but growing literature intent on exploring the interface between phenomenology and cognitive science. But despite these developments, there is still some obscurity about what exactly neurophenomenology is. What are neurophenomenologists trying to do, and how are they trying to do (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  46. Katalin Balog (2012). In Defense of the Phenomenal Concept Strategy1. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 84 (1):1-23.
    During the last two decades, several different anti-physicalist arguments based on an epistemic or conceptual gap between the phenomenal and the physical have been proposed. The most promising physicalist line of defense in the face of these arguments – the Phenomenal Concept Strategy – is based on the idea that these epistemic and conceptual gaps can be explained by appeal to the nature of phenomenal concepts rather than the nature of non-physical phenomenal properties. Phenomenal concepts, on this proposal, involve unique (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  47.  16
    Ralph Hertwig & Ido Erev (2009). The Description–Experience Gap in Risky Choice. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (12):517-523.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   20 citations  
  48.  1
    Linda Thorne & Susan Bartholomew Saunders (2002). The Socio-Cultural Embeddedness of Individuals' Ethical Reasoning in Organizations (Cross-Cultural Ethics). Journal of Business Ethics 35 (1):1 - 14.
    While models of business ethics increasingly recognize that ethical behavior varies cross-culturally, scant attention has been given to understanding how culture affects the ethical reasoning process that predicates individuals' ethical actions. To address this gap, this paper illustrates how culture may affect the various components of individuals' ethical reasoning by integrating findings from the cross-cultural management literature with cognitive-developmental perspective. Implications for future research and transnational organizations are discussed.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   28 citations  
  49.  27
    Arianna Ferrari, Christopher Coenen & Armin Grunwald (2012). Visions and Ethics in Current Discourse on Human Enhancement. NanoEthics 6 (3):215-229.
    Since it is now broadly acknowledged that ethics should receive early consideration in discourse on emerging technologies, ethical debates tend to flourish even while new fields of technology are still in their infancy. Such debates often liberally mix existing applications with technologies in the pipeline and far-reaching visions. This paper analyses the problems associated with this use of ethics as “preparatory” research, taking discourse on human enhancement in general and on pharmaceutical cognitive enhancement in particular (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  50.  54
    Tom Froese & Ezequiel A. Di Paolo (2009). Sociality and the Life–Mind Continuity Thesis. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (4):439-463.
    The life–mind continuity thesis holds that mind is prefigured in life and that mind belongs to life. The biggest challenge faced by proponents of this thesis is to show how an explanatory framework that accounts for basic biological processes can be systematically extended to incorporate the highest reaches of human cognition. We suggest that this apparent ‘cognitive gap’ between minimal and human forms of life appears insurmountable largely because of the methodological individualism that is prevalent in cognitive science. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000