Search results for 'collective decisions' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  36
    Christian List (2005). The Probability of Inconsistencies in Complex Collective Decisions. Social Choice and Welfare 24 (1):3-32.
    Many groups make decisions over multiple interconnected propositions. The “doctrinal paradox” or “discursive dilemma” shows that propositionwise majority voting can generate inconsistent collective sets of judgments, even when individual sets of judgments are all consistent. I develop a simple model for determining the probability of the paradox, given various assumptions about the probability distribution of individual sets of judgments, including impartial culture and impartial anonymous culture assumptions. I prove several convergence results, identifying when the probability of the paradox (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  2.  24
    Srećko Kovač (2012). Logical Opposition and Collective Decisions. In Jean-Yves Béziau & Dale Jacquette (eds.), Around and Beyond the Square of Opposition. Springer 341--356.
    The square of opposition (as part of a lattice) is used as a natural way to represent different and opposite ways of who makes decisions, and in what way, in/for a group or a society. Majority logic is characterized by multiple logical squares (one for each possible majority), with the “discursive dilemma” as a consequence. Three-valued logics of majority decisions with discursive dilemma undecided, of veto, consensus, and sequential voting are analyzed from the semantic point of view. For (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  38
    Luc Bovens & Wlodek Rabinowicz (2004). Voting Procedures for Complex Collective Decisions. An Epistemic Perspective. Ratio Juris 17 (2):241-258.
    Suppose a committee or a jury confronts a complex question, the answer to which requires attending to several sub-questions. Two different voting procedures can be used. On one, the committee members vote on each sub-question and the voting results are used as premises for the committee’s conclusion on the main issue. This premise-based procedure can be contrasted with the conclusion-based approach, which requires the members to directly vote on the conclusion, with the vote of each member being guided by her (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  4.  6
    Mostapha Diss & Patrizia Pérez-Asurmendi (forthcoming). Consistent Collective Decisions Under Majorities Based on Difference of Votes. Theory and Decision.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  9
    Adrian Little (2003). State Anarchy and Collective Decisions: Some Applications of Game Theory to Political Economy. Contemporary Political Theory 2 (1):135-136.
  6.  3
    Hugh Ward (2003). State Anarchy and Collective Decisions: Some Applications of Game Theory to Political Economy. Contemporary Political Theory 2 (1):135.
  7.  6
    Luc Bovens & Wlodek Rabinowicz, Complex Collective Decisions: An Epistemic Perspective.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  13
    Wulf Gaertner (1985). Justice-Constrained Libertarian Claims and Pareto Efficient Collective Decisions. Erkenntnis 23 (1):1 - 17.
    This paper discusses justice-constrained libertarian claims that were proposed as a way to circumvent the impossibility of the Paretian liberal. Since most of the results are negative in character, we suggest an alternative route: A requirement on the structure of individual orderings should be combined with the idea that under particular circumstances individual decisiveness should be controlled by higher-order principles.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  1
    Bethany Spielman (1994). Collective Decisions About Medical Futility. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 22 (2):152-160.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Bethany Spielman (1994). Collective Decisions About Medical Futility. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 22 (2):152-160.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Hugh Ward (2003). State Anarchy and Collective Decisions: Some Applications of Game Theory to Political Economy. Contemporary Political Theory 2 (1):135-136.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  17
    Elisabeth Boetzkes Gedge (2004). Collective Moral Imagination: Making Decisions for Persons with Dementia. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (4):435 – 450.
    Much debate concerning 'precedent autonomy' - that is, the authority of former, competent selves to govern the welfare of later, non-competent selves - has assumed a radical discontinuity between selves, and has overlooked the 'bridging' role of intimate proxy decision-makers. I consider a recent proposal by Lynn et al. (1999) that presents a provocative alternative, foregrounding an imagined dialogue between the formerly competent patient and her/his trusted others. I consider what standards must be met for such dialogues to have moral (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  10
    Elisabeth Boetzkes Gedge (2004). Collective Moral Imagination: Making Decisions for Persons With Dementia. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (4):435-450.
    Much debate concerning ‘precedent autonomy’ – that is, the authority of former, competent selves to govern the welfare of later, non-competent selves – has assumed a radical discontinuity between selves, and has overlooked the ‘bridging’ role of intimate proxy decision-makers. I consider a recent proposal by Lynn et al. (1999) that presents a provocative alternative, foregrounding an imagined dialogue between the formerly competent patient and her/his trusted others. I consider what standards must be met for such dialogues to have moral (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Danny Frederick (2011). Scarcity and Saving Lives. The Reasoner 5 (6):89-90.
    I argue that, because of scarcity, the right to life cannot imply an obligation on others to save the life of the right-holder, and that collectivising resources for health care not only ensures that resources are used inefficiently and inappropriately but also removes from people the authority to make decisions for themselves about matters of health, life and death.
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  42
    David Zoller (2015). Moral Responsibility for Distant Collective Harms. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 18 (5):995-1010.
    While it is well recognized that many everyday consumer behaviors, such as purchases of sweatshop goods, come at a cost to the global poor, it has proven difficult to argue that even knowing, repeat contributors are somehow morally complicit in those outcomes. Some recent approaches contend that marginal contributions to distant harms are consequences that consumers straightforwardly should have born in mind, which would make consumers seem reckless or negligent. Critics reasonably reply that the bad luck that my innocent purchase (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  41
    Christian List (2004). A Model of Path-Dependence in Decisions Over Multiple Propositions. American Political Science Review 98 (3):495-513.
    I model sequential decisions over multiple interconnected propositions and investigate path-dependence in such decisions. The propositions and their interconnections are represented in propositional logic. A sequential decision process is path-dependent if its outcome depends on the order in which the propositions are considered. Assuming that earlier decisions constrain later ones, I prove three main results: First, certain rationality violations by the decision-making agent—individual or group—are necessary and sufficient for path-dependence. Second, under some conditions, path-dependence is unavoidable in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  17.  4
    Chris Gyngell & Thomas Douglas (2015). Stocking the Genetic Supermarket: Reproductive Genetic Technologies and Collective Action Problems. Bioethics 29 (4):241-250.
    Reproductive genetic technologies allow parents to decide whether their future children will have or lack certain genetic predispositions. A popular model that has been proposed for regulating access to RGTs is the ‘genetic supermarket’. In the genetic supermarket, parents are free to make decisions about which genes to select for their children with little state interference. One possible consequence of the genetic supermarket is that collective action problems will arise: if rational individuals use the genetic supermarket in isolation (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  18.  63
    Ludvig Beckman (2014). The Subjects of Collectively Binding Decisions: Democratic Inclusion and Extraterritorial Law. Ratio Juris 27 (2):252-270.
    Citizenship and residency are basic conditions for political inclusion in a democracy. However, if democracy is premised on the inclusion of everyone subject to collectively binding decisions, the relevance of either citizenship or residency for recognition as a member of the polity is uncertain. The aim of this paper is to specify the conditions for being subject to collective decisions in the sense relevant to democratic theory. Three conceptions of what it means to be subject to collectively (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  19.  3
    Dan Bang, Riccardo Fusaroli, Kristian Tylén, Karsten Olsen, Peter E. Latham, Jennifer Y. F. Lau, Andreas Roepstorff, Geraint Rees, Chris D. Frith & Bahador Bahrami (2014). Does Interaction Matter? Testing Whether a Confidence Heuristic Can Replace Interaction in Collective Decision-Making. Consciousness and Cognition 26:13-23.
    In a range of contexts, individuals arrive at collective decisions by sharing confidence in their judgements. This tendency to evaluate the reliability of information by the confidence with which it is expressed has been termed the ‘confidence heuristic’. We tested two ways of implementing the confidence heuristic in the context of a collective perceptual decision-making task: either directly, by opting for the judgement made with higher confidence, or indirectly, by opting for the faster judgement, exploiting an inverse (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  20.  7
    John A. Weymark (2015). Cognitive Diversity, Binary Decisions, and Epistemic Democracy. Episteme 12 (4):497-511.
    In Democratic Reason, Hne Landemore has built a case for the epistemic virtues of inclusive deliberative democracy based on the cognitive diversity of the group engaged in making collective decisions. She supports her thesis by appealing to the Diversity Trumps Ability Theorem of Lu Hong and Scott Page. This theorem is quite technical and the informal statements of it aimed at democratic theorists are inaccurate, which has resulted in some misguided critiques of the theorem's applicability to democratic politics. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Daniel Andler (forthcoming). What has Collective Wisdom to Do with Wisdom? In J. Elster & H. Landemore (eds.), Collective Wisdom. Cambridge Universuty Press
    Conventional wisdom holds two seemingly opposed beliefs. One is that communities are often much better than individuals at dealing with certain situations or solving certain problems. The other is that crowds are usually, and some say always, at best as intelligent as their least intelligent members and at worst even less. Consistency would seem to be easily re-established by distinguishing between advanced, sophisticated social organizations which afford the supporting communities a high level of collective performance, and primitive, mob-like structures (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. María G. Navarro (2013). How to Interpret Collective Aggregated Judgments? Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 2 (11):26-27.
    Our digital society increasingly relies in the power of others’ aggregated judgments to make decisions. Questions as diverse as which film we will watch, what scientific news we will decide to read, which path we will follow to find a place, or what political candidate we will vote for are usually associated to a rating that influences our final decisions.
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  5
    Ludvig Beckman (2015). Political Representation of Future Generations and Collective Responsibility. Jurisprudence 6 (3):516-534.
    The political representation of future generations would change the relationship between public decisions and the members of democratic political systems. In this paper we examine the implication of these changes on the responsibility of the living members for the future effects of current polices with special reference to climate change. The claim defended is that the collective responsibility of the living members for future outcomes diminishes when public decisions are made less responsive to them. In order to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  2
    Ludvig Beckman (2015). Political Representation of Future Generations and Collective Responsibility. Jurisprudence 6 (3):516-534.
    The political representation of future generations would change the relationship between public decisions and the members of democratic political systems. In this paper we examine the implication of these changes on the responsibility of the living members for the future effects of current polices with special reference to climate change. The claim defended is that the collective responsibility of the living members for future outcomes diminishes when public decisions are made less responsive to them. In order to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  35
    Kaarlo Miller (2003). Collective Reasoning and the Discursive Dilemma. Philosophical Explorations 6 (3):182 – 200.
    The paper begins with a discussion of Philip Pettit's distinction between individualistic and collectivistic reasoning strategies. I argue that many of his examples, when correctly analysed, do not give rise to what he calls the discursive dilemma. I argue for a collectivistic strategy, which is a holistic premise-driven strategy. I will concentrate on three aspects of collective reasoning, which I call the publicity aspect, the collective acceptance aspect, and the historical constraint aspect: First, the premises of collective (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  4
    Janice Wood-Harper (2005). Informing Education Policy on MMR: Balancing Individual Freedoms and Collective Responsibilities for the Promotion of Public Health. Nursing Ethics 12 (1):43-58.
    The recent decrease in public confidence in the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine has important implications for individuals and public health. This article presents moral arguments relating to conflicts between individual autonomy and collective responsibilities in vaccination decisions with a view to informing and advising health professionals and improving the effectiveness of education policies in avoiding resurgence of endemic measles. Lower population immunity, due to falling uptake, is hastening the need for greater public awareness of the consequences for (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  27.  19
    Michael L. Anderson, The Origins of Collective Overvaluation: Irrational Exuberance Emerges From Simple, Honest and Rational Individual Behavior.
    The generation of value bubbles is an inherently psychological and social process, where information sharing and individual decisions can affect representations of value. Bubbles occur in many domains, from the stock market, to the runway, to the laboratories of science. Here we seek to understand how psychological and social processes lead representations (i.e., expectations) of value to become divorced from the inherent value, using asset bubbles as an example. We hypothesize that simple asset group switching rules can give rise (...)
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  3
    Aulis Aarnio (1998). On Collective Actions. Some Remarks on the Theory of Legal Actions. Ratio Juris 11 (1):1-11.
    In this paper the author deals with collegial judicial decisions as a form of human action. The scope is, however, limited to three questions: What is the structure and the status of the general theory of action; Is this theory applicable to such performative acts as judicial decisions; and finally, Is it possible to speak about action in connection with collective agents such as collegial courts? The author defends the thesis that general theory of action as such (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Céline Louche & Christel Dumas (2016). Collective Beliefs on Responsible Investment. Business and Society 55 (3):427-457.
    The financial community does not seem to have shifted to greater sustainability, despite increasing awareness and concerns around social and environmental issues. This article provides insights to help understand why. Building on responsible investment data from the U.K. financial press between 1982 and 2010, the authors examine the collective beliefs which financial actors rely on to take decisions under uncertainty, as a way of understanding the status of and implications for RI mainstreaming. The analysis of collective beliefs (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Déirdre Smith (2014). Fostering Collective Ethical Capacity Within the Teaching Profession. Journal of Academic Ethics 12 (4):271-286.
    A depth of ethical knowledge and understanding are essential for the enactment of ethical decisions and actions. Ethics is the foundational core for democratic teaching, learning and educational leadership. It is imperative that the development of ethical insight and the formation of an ethical stance become fundamental elements of both initial and continuing teacher education. Educators must be adept at cultivating ethical cultures within schools and districts. They need to know how to effectively foster the collective ethical capacity (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Cathal O'Madagain (2014). Can Groups Have Concepts? Semantics for Collective Intentions. Philosophical Issues 24 (1):347-363.
    A substantial literature supports the attribution of intentional states such as beliefs and desires to groups. But within this literature, there is no substantial account of group concepts. Since on many views, one cannot have an intentional state without having concepts, such a gap undermines the cogency of accounts of group intentionality. In this paper I aim to provide an account of group concepts. First I argue that to fix the semantics of the sentences groups use to make their (...) or express their beliefs, we need to appeal to a conventional semantics like that of Lewis. I then argue that the same reasons we have for taking group intentional states to be irreducible to the intentional states of their members apply also to the terms fixed by a conventional semantics. It follows that the meanings of terms in the sentences expressing a group's intentional states are also fixed by facts about the group, not its members. And recognizing this, I argue, amounts to attributing concepts to groups. Finally, I discuss a real-life example of a group concept—the meaning of ‘meter’ as fixed by the International Bureau of Weights and Measurements—and I discuss the upshot of these considerations for the question of social externalism about concepts. (shrink)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  1
    Michael Morreau & Aidan Lyon (2016). How Common Standards Can Diminish Collective Intelligence: A Computational Study. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 22 (4):xx-yy.
    Making good decisions depends on having accurate information – quickly, and in a form in which it can be readily communicated and acted upon. Two features of medical practice can help: deliberation in groups and the use of scores and grades in evaluation. We study the contributions of these features using a multi-agent computer simulation of groups of physicians. One might expect individual differences in members’ grading standards to reduce the capacity of the group to discover the facts on (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  11
    Gabriella Pigozzi (forthcoming). The Logic of Group Decisions: Judgment Aggregation. Journal of Philosophical Logic:1-15.
    Judgment aggregation studies how individual opinions on a given set of propositions can be aggregated to form a consistent group judgment on the same propositions. Despite the simplicity of the problem, seemingly natural aggregation procedures fail to return consistent collective outcomes, leading to what is now known as the doctrinal paradox. The first occurrences of the paradox were discovered in the legal realm. However, the interest of judgment aggregation is much broader and extends to political philosophy, epistemology, social choice (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  26
    Christian List, Social Choice Theory. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Social choice theory is the study of collective decision processes and procedures. It is not a single theory, but a cluster of models and results concerning the aggregation of individual inputs (e.g., votes, preferences, judgments, welfare) into collective outputs (e.g., collective decisions, preferences, judgments, welfare). Central questions are: How can a group of individuals choose a winning outcome (e.g., policy, electoral candidate) from a given set of options? What are the properties of different voting systems? When (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  35.  33
    René von Schomberg, From the Ethics of Technology Towards an Ethics of Knowledge Policy. AI and Society.
    My analysis takes as its point of departure the controversial assumption that contemporary ethical theories cannot capture adequately the ethical and social challenges of scientific and technological development. This assumption is rooted in the argument that classical ethical theory invariably addresses the issue of ethical responsibility in terms of whether and how intentional actions of individuals can be justified. Scientific and technological developments, however, have produced unintentional consequences and side-consequences. These consequences very often result from collective decisions concerning (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  59
    William A. Edmundson, Distributive Justice and Distributed Obligations.
    Collectivities, that is, groups constituted by some procedure for making group decisions, can be agents. Collectivities can be moral agents if they can appreciate and act upon moral reasons. Collectivities thus can have obligations that are not simply the aggregate of preexisting obligations of their members. Certain kinds of collective obligation distribute over their membership, i.e., become members’ obligations to do a fair share to fulfill the collectivity’s obligation. In incremental good cases, i.e., those in which a member’s (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  47
    Christian List, Christian Elsholtz & Thomas Seeley (2009). Independence and Interdependence in Collective Decision Making: An Agent-Based Model of Nest-Site Choice by Honey Bee Swarms. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B 364:755-762.
    Condorcet's classic jury theorem shows that when the members of a group have noisy but independent information about what is best for the group as a whole, majority decisions tend to outperform dictatorial ones. When voting is supplemented by communication, however, the resulting interdependencies between decision-makers can strengthen or undermine this effect: they can facilitate information pooling, but also amplify errors. We consider an intriguing non-human case of independent information pooling combined with communication: the case of nest-site choice by (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  38.  10
    Susumu Cato (2011). Pareto Principles, Positive Responsiveness, and Majority Decisions. Theory and Decision 71 (4):503-518.
    This article investigates the relationship among the weak Pareto principle, the strong Pareto principle, and positive responsiveness in the context of voting. First, it is shown that under a mild domain condition, if an anonymous and neutral collective choice rule (CCR) is complete and transitive, then the weak Pareto principle and the strong Pareto principle are equivalent. Next, it is shown that under another mild domain condition, if a neutral CCR is transitive, then the strong Pareto principle and positive (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  39.  15
    Emmanuelle Auriol & Robert J. Gary-Bobo (2007). On Robust Constitution Design. Theory and Decision 62 (3):241-279.
    We study a class of representation mechanisms, based on reports made by a random subset of agents, called representatives, in a collective choice problem with quasi-linear utilities. We do not assume the existence of a common prior probability describing the distribution of preference types. In addition, there is no benevolent planner. Decisions will be carried out by an individual who cannot be assumed impartial, a self-interested executive. These assumptions impose new constraints on Mechanism Design. A robust mechanism is (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  40.  19
    N. Press, J. R. Fishman & B. A. Koenig (2000). Collective Fear, Individualized Risk: The Social and Cultural Context of Genetic Testing for Breast Cancer. Nursing Ethics 7 (3):237-249.
    The purpose of this article is to provide a critical examination of two aspects of culture and biomedicine that have helped to shape the meaning and practice of genetic testing for breast cancer. These are: (1) the cultural construction of fear of breast cancer, which has been fuelled in part by (2) the predominance of a ‘risk’ paradigm in contemporary biomedicine. The increasing elaboration and delineation of risk factors and risk numbers are in part intended to help women to contend (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  41.  24
    Alexei M. Marcoux (2006). A Counterintuitive Argument for Résumé Embellishment. Journal of Business Ethics 63 (2):183-194.
    Applied ethicists say little about résumé embellishment. Presumably, this is so because résumé embellishment seems obviously wrong; an instance of ordinary lying, familiar moral prohibitions against which cover the case completely. Analysis of résumé embellishment merely as ordinary lying overlooks its collective action aspects. Taking account of those aspects and their implications, I argue on consequentialist grounds that, given some plausible background conditions, a limited form of résumé embellishment is morally permissible. This outcome is a particular instantiation of a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  42.  11
    Walter Carnielli (2008). The Tyranny of Knowledge. Manuscrito 31 (1):511-518.
    EN In his “Logic, Language, and Knowledge” Chateaubriand denounces the tyranny of belief , but takes some positions on knowledge and justification which seem to be too exacting. The fact that Chateaubriand derives constraints on the notion of justification by a close parallel to the notion of proof makes it unnecessarily loaded with the individual, rather than with the collective perspective. His position seems to leave little room for common knowledge, collective knowledge and usual common-sense knowledge, and absolutely (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  6
    Jovan Babić (2012). On State, Identity and Rights: Putting Identity First. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 25 (2):197-209.
    The paper considers the nature of the state understood as the political unity articulated on the basis of a collective identity which provides the state with its capacity to make decisions. The foremost decision of the state to protect and defend this identity is the source of its authority to enforce laws. Collective identity thus represents an object of special interest, unlike both “political” interests (Millian other-regarding acts) and private interests (Millian self-regarding acts). The validation of laws (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  6
    Joanne C. Lau (2014). Voting in Bad Faith. Res Publica 20 (3):281-294.
    What is wrong with participating in a democratic decision-making process, and then doing something other than the outcome of the decision? It is often thought that collective decision-making entails being prima facie bound to the outcome of that decision, although little analysis has been done on why that is the case. Conventional perspectives are inadequate to explain its wrongness. I offer a new and more robust analysis on the nature of voting: voting when you will accept the outcome only (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  7
    Tineke A. Abma & Vivianne Baur (2012). Seeking Connections, Creating Movement: The Power of Altruistic Action. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis (4):1-19.
    Participation of older people in designing and improving the care and services provided in residential care settings is limited. Traditional forms of democratic representation, such as client councils, and consumer models are management-driven. An alternative way of involving older people in the decisions over their lives, grounded in notions of care ethics and deliberative democracy, was explored by action research. In line with this tradition older people engage in collective action to enhance the control over their lives and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  1
    Asghar Montazerol Ghaem, Bahman Zeinali & Seyed Asghar Mahmoud Abadi (2012). " Dar-Al-Nodveh": The First Experience of Collective Wisdom in Managing Mecca City. Asian Culture and History 5 (1):p18.
    The history of Hejaz especially in one century before Islam was affected by Quraysh tribe. All political, social and economical changes were under the control of Quraysh leaders. Qsy Ibn Kalab was the most influential leader of this tribe during history. His unique courageous deeds have change Quraysh from some dispersed tribes to a unified effective tribe. Among such acts of this leader was foundation of "Dar-Al-Nodveh" which was very significant. Dar-Al-Nodveh guaranteed the success of all acts performed in Quraysh (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  1
    Farhat Moazam (2013). Pakistan and Kidney Trade: Battles Won, Battles to Come. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):925-928.
    This essay provides a brief overview of the rise of organ trade in Pakistan towards the end of the last century and the concerted, collective struggle—of physicians and medical associations aided by the media, journalists, members of civil society, and senior judiciary—in pressuring the government to bring about and implement a national law criminalizing such practices opposed by an influential pro-organ trade lobby. It argues that among the most effective measures to prevent re-emergence of organ trafficking in the country (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Alan Kirman (2011). Complex Economics: Individual and Collective Rationality. Routledge.
    The economic crisis is also a crisis for economic theory. Most analyses of the evolution of the crisis invoke three themes, contagion, networks and trust, yet none of these play a major role in standard macroeconomic models. What is needed is a theory in which these aspects are central. The direct interaction between individuals, firms and banks does not simply produce imperfections in the functioning of the economy but is the very basis of the functioning of a modern economy. This (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  86
    Christian List (2006). The Discursive Dilemma and Public Reason. Ethics 116 (2):362-402.
    Political theorists have offered many accounts of collective decision-making under pluralism. I discuss a key dimension on which such accounts differ: the importance assigned not only to the choices made but also to the reasons underlying those choices. On that dimension, different accounts lie in between two extremes. The ‘minimal liberal account’ holds that collective decisions should be made only on practical actions or policies and that underlying reasons should be kept private. The ‘comprehensive deliberative account’ stresses (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   27 citations  
  50.  28
    Johan van Benthem, Preference Logic, Conditionals and Solution Concepts in Games.
    Preference is a basic notion in human behaviour, underlying such varied phenomena as individual rationality in the philosophy of action and game theory, obligations in deontic logic (we should aim for the best of all possible worlds), or collective decisions in social choice theory. Also, in a more abstract sense, preference orderings are used in conditional logic or non-monotonic reasoning as a way of arranging worlds into more or less plausible ones. The field of preference logic (cf. Hansson (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000