Search results for 'colonialism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Geng Yang & Qixue Zhang (2006). The Essence, Characteristics and Limitation of Post-Colonialism: From Karl Marx's Point of View. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (2):279-294.score: 24.0
    Following postmodernism, post-colonialism reflects modernity from a new perspective-the cultural perspective. Post-colonialism interprets colonialism contained in modernity, deconstructs orientalism and cultural hegemonism, and turns western reflection of modernity into an inquiry about the global relationship between the East and the West. Post-colonialism brings forward a new theoretical domain, that is, the colonizational relationship between the East and the West in the process of modernization. This interpretation expresses a strong tendency of anti-western centrality and shares some ideas (...)
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  2. Howard Williams (2014). Colonialism in Kant's Political Philosophy. Diametros 39:154-181.score: 24.0
    This article examines the controversy that has arisen concerning the interpretation of Immanuel Kant's account of European colonialism. One the one hand there are those interpreters such as Robert Bernasconi who see Kant's account as all of a piece with his earlier views on race which demonstrate a certain narrow mindedness in relation to black and coloured people and, on the other hand, there are those such as Pauline Kleingeld and Allen Wood who argue that the earlier writings on (...)
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  3. Jane Krishnadas (2006). The Sexual Subaltern in Conversations “Somewhere in Between”: Law and the Old Politics of Colonialism. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 14 (1):53-77.score: 24.0
    Ratna Kapur’s recent book entitled Erotic Justice proposes a new politics of postcolonialism whereby the sexual subaltern disrupts the normative principles of the universal, liberal, legal domain. Kapur traces legal strategies regarding censorship, sex-work, homosexuality, sexual harassment, trafficking and migration which travel a treacherous path, countering allegations of ‘unIndian’ and Western practice with cultural histories of ‘authentic’ sexual legitimacies, towards a new politics of desire. Kapur frames her analysis through postcolonial feminist theory as providing a tool for feminist struggle, yet (...)
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  4. Ranjana Khanna (2003). Dark Continents: Psychoanalysis and Colonialism. Duke University Press.score: 21.0
    Genealogies -- Psychoanalysis and archaeology -- Freud in the sacred grove -- Colonial rescriptings -- War, decolonization, psychoanalysis -- Colonial melancholy -- Haunting and the future -- The ethical ambiguities of transnational feminism -- Hamlet in the colonial archive.
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  5. Yang Geng & Zhang Qixue (2006). The Essence, Characteristics and Limitation of Post-Colonialism: From Karl Marx's Point of View. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (2):279-294.score: 21.0
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  6. Barbara Arneil (1996). John Locke and America: The Defence of English Colonialism. Oxford Unioversity Press.score: 18.0
    This book considers the context of the colonial policies of Britain, Locke's contribution to them, and the importance of these ideas in his theory of property. It also reconsiders the debate about John Locke's influence in America. The book argues that Locke's theory of property must be understood in connection with the philosopher's political concerns, as part of his endeavour to justify the colonialist policies of Lord Shaftesbury's cabinet, with which he was personally associated. The author maintains that traditional scholarship (...)
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  7. M. Annette Jaimes (2003). "Patriarchal Colonialism" and Indigenism: Implications for Native Feminist Spirituality and Native Womanism. Hypatia 18 (2):58-69.score: 18.0
    : This essay begins with a Native American women's perspective on Early Feminism which came about as a result of Euroamerican patriarchy in U. S. society. It is followed by the myth of "tribalism," regarding the language and laws of U. S. colonialism imposed upon Native American peoples and their respective cultures. This colonialism is well documented in Federal Indian law and public policy by the U.S. government, which includes the state as well as federal level. The paper (...)
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  8. Robert C. Perez (2011). Guantánamo and the Logic of Colonialism. Radical Philosophy Review 14 (1):25-47.score: 18.0
    The creation of the prison camp at the U.S. naval base in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba is part of a historical continuity of colonialism on the island. Over two hundred years before the United States sent the first "enemy combatants" to Cuba, the Spanish Empire began sending "enemy Indians" to the island. The rationales and circumstances that gave rise to the prison complex in Guantánamo share much in common with those that motivated Spain to imprison Apaches and other Native people (...)
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  9. S. Maffettone (2011). How to Avoid the Liaison Dangereuse Between Post-Colonialism and Postmodernism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (4):493-504.score: 18.0
    Post-colonial theories present narratives of discontent based on resentment toward colonial exploitation and cultural hegemony. The substance matter of post-colonial narratives (their first-order argument) is sound. Post-colonial theories often rely on a post-modern philosophical argumentative structure (their second-order argument). The second-order argument is not able to support the first-order argument. In particular, the nihilist consequences of post-modernism make impossible the construction of a (post-colonial) discourse through which the discontent is transformed in a basis for a reasonable political action. The lack (...)
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  10. Barbara Arneil (1992). John Locke, Natural Law and Colonialism. History of Political Thought 13 (4):587-603.score: 18.0
    In John Locke's Two Treatises of Government, the state of nature, and more particularly natural man, are created within the tradition of natural law. Several commentators, such as James Tully and Karl Olivecrona, have recognized this legacy in Locke's political thought.1 While providing an analysis of Locke's thought in relation to natural law, such studies, however, have not fully examined the global context within which both the Two Treatises and seventeenth-century natural law developed. Consequently the extent to which natural law (...)
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  11. Alicia Turner (2013). The Bible, the Bottle and the Knife: Religion as a Mode of Resisting Colonialism for U Dhammaloka. Contemporary Buddhism 14 (1):66-77.score: 18.0
    While those who sought solidarity between Asians and Europeans in the colonial era often ended up replicating the colonial divisions they had hoped to overcome, the interstitial position of working class and beachcomber Buddhist monks allowed for more substantive modes of solidarity and critique. U Dhammaloka offered a sophisticated critique of British colonialism in its religious, cultural and material modes, but opted to focus his efforts on Buddhism as an avenue of resistance because it offered him a means of (...)
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  12. Barbara Arneil (2012). Liberal Colonialism, Domestic Colonies and Citizenship. History of Political Thought 33 (3):491-523.score: 18.0
    There is a growing body of literature which argues that the two major theories of liberal citizenship (those of John Locke and J.S. Mill) were deeply enmeshed with both colonization (the processes by which the imperial state takes over the land and/or sovereignty of another country) and colonialism (the theoretical framework by which colonization is justified). This article, builds upon this literature but asks whether the existence of hundreds of domestic colonies within (as opposed to outside) the borders of (...)
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  13. Peter J. Cain (2011). Bentham and the Development of the British Critique of Colonialism. Utilitas 23 (1):1-24.score: 18.0
    This article examines Bentham's contribution to anti-colonial thought in the context of the development of the British radical movement that attacked colonialism on the grounds that it advantaged what Bentham called the at the expense of the . It shows that Bentham was influenced as much by Josiah Tucker and James Anderson as by Adam Smith. Bentham's early economic critique is examined, and the sharp changes in his arguments after 1800 assessed, in the context of the American and French (...)
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  14. C. G. Campbell (2010). 'Mill's Liberal Project and Defence of Colonialism From a Post-Colonial Perspective. South African Journal of Philosophy 29 (2).score: 18.0
    Whilst this paper was initially part of a larger project tracing the development of Anglo-American thought from the colonial through to the post-colonial era, below it stands alone as reflection on the colonialism of John Stuart Mill read from a post-colonial perspective. It aims to show that Mill's views on colonial rule were largely informed by his principle of liberty which, in turn, was based on his qualitative utilitarianism. The driving force behind his colonialism, as with his work (...)
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  15. Doris Garraway (2009). Of Speaking Natives and Hybrid Philosophers: The French Enlightenment Critique of Colonialism. In Daniel Carey & Lynn Festa (eds.), The Postcolonial Enlightenment: Eighteenth-Century Colonialism and Postcolonial Theory. Oup Oxford.score: 18.0
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  16. Edward Keene (2002). Beyond the Anarchical Society: Grotius, Colonialism and Order in World Politics. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    It is commonly argued that the international system is currently in a state of upheaval, as state sovereignty is challenged by a variety of forces. Keene's book questions this assumption, arguing that sovereignty has never existed globally in any case, and suggesting that it has applied only to Western states. International relations elsewhere have been characterized by the norms of colonialism, rather than international law. The book examines the conduct of the British and Dutch empires, and how the traditions (...)
     
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  17. Grace Ji-Sun Kim (2013). Colonialism, Han, and the Transformative Spirit. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 18.0
    1. Empire, Colonialism, and Globalization -- 2. Consumerism and Overconsumption -- 3. Nature and "Han" -- 4. Transformative Power of the Spirit -- Conclusion.
     
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  18. Jean-Paul Sartre (2001). Colonialism and Neocolonialism. Routledge.score: 18.0
    Colonialism and Neo-Colonialism is a classic critique of France's policies in Algeria in the 1950s and 1960s and inspired much subsequent writing on colonialism, post-colonialism, politics, and literature. It includes Sartre's celebrated preface to Fanon's classic Wretched of the Earth. Colonialism and Neo-Colonialism had a profound impact on French intellectual life, inspiring many other influential French thinkers and critics of colonialism such as Jean-Francois Lyotard, Frantz Fanon, Pierre Bourdieu and Jacques Derrida.
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  19. Robert Bernasconi (2001). Eliminating the Cycle of Violence: The Place of a Dying Colonialism Within Fanon's Revolutionary Thought. Philosophia Africana 4 (2):17-25.score: 15.0
  20. Daniel Butt (2013). Colonialism and Postcolonialism. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Blackwell. 892-898.score: 15.0
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  21. Felix S. Cohen (1945). Colonialism: A Realistic Approach. Ethics 55 (3):167-181.score: 15.0
  22. Margaret Kohn, Colonialism. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 15.0
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  23. Lea Ypi (2013). What's Wrong with Colonialism. Philosophy and Public Affairs 41 (2):158-191.score: 15.0
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  24. Kok-Chor Tan (2007). Colonialism, Reparations, and Global Justice. In Jon Miller & Rahul Kumar (eds.), Reparations: Interdisciplinary Inquiries. Oxford University Press. 280--306.score: 15.0
  25. L. U. Catherine (2011). Colonialism as Structural Injustice: Historical Responsibility and Contemporary Redress. Journal of Political Philosophy 19 (3):261-281.score: 15.0
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  26. Sumit Sarkar (2004). On Raj Chandavarkar's The Origins of Industrial Capitalism in India: Business Strategies and the Working Classes in Bombay, 1900–1940 and Imperial Power and Popular Politics: Class, Resistance and the State in India, C. 1850–1950, Ian Kerr's Building the Railways of the Raj, Dilip Simeon's The Politics of Labour Under Late Colonialism: Workers, Unions and the State in Chota Nagpur, 1928–1939, Janaki Nair's Miners and Millhands: Work, Culture and Politics in Princely Mysore and Chitra Joshi's Lost Worlds: Indian Labour and its Forgotten Histories. [REVIEW] Historical Materialism 12 (3):285-313.score: 15.0
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  27. Uma Narayan (1995). Colonialism and Its Others: Considerations on Rights and Care Discourses. Hypatia 10 (2):133 - 140.score: 15.0
    I point to a colonial care discourse that enabled colonizers to define themselves in relationship to "inferior" colonized subjects. The colonized, however, had very different accounts of this relationship. While contemporary care discourse correctly insists on acknowledging human needs and relationships, it needs to worry about who defines these often contested terms. I conclude that improvements along dimensions of care and of justice often provide "enabling conditions" for each other.
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  28. Heather Widdows (2007). Is Global Ethics Moral Neo-Colonialism? An Investigation of the Issue in the Context of Bioethics. Bioethics 21 (6):305–315.score: 15.0
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  29. Sandy Grande (2003). Whitestream Feminism and the Colonialist Project: A Review of Contemporary Feminist Pedagogy and Praxis. [REVIEW] Educational Theory 53 (3):329-346.score: 15.0
  30. Joanne Miyang Cho (2011). Provincializing Albert Schweitzer's Ethical Colonialism in Africa. The European Legacy 16 (1):71-86.score: 15.0
    Unlike many commentators who tend to see Schweitzer's mission one-sidedly, I show the coexistence of liberal and conservative elements in his mission. While his mission intent was mostly motivated by the former, his mission practices largely show the latter. In this essay, I analyze them in detail in three parts. I first explain how such opposite elements can coexist by applying Dipesh Chakrabarty's notion of provincializing Europe. Like most nineteenth-century Western liberals, Schweitzer advocated Enlightenment rights for Europeans, but denied them (...)
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  31. Abdul R. JanMohamed (1985). The Economy of Manichean Allegory: The Function of Racial Difference in Colonialist Literature. Critical Inquiry 12 (1):59.score: 15.0
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  32. Polycarp Ikuenobe (1998). Colonialism in Africa, Culturally Induced Moral Ignorance, and the Scope of Responsibility. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 28 (2):109–128.score: 15.0
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  33. Tsenay Serequeberhan (1989). The Idea of Colonialism in Hegel's Philosophy of Right. International Philosophical Quarterly 29 (3):301-318.score: 15.0
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  34. Don Habibi (1999). The Moral Dimensions of J. S. Mill's Colonialism. Journal of Social Philosophy 30 (1):125-146.score: 15.0
  35. Andrew B. Irvine (2000). Cultural Participation and Post-Colonialism. Sophia 39 (1):132-170.score: 15.0
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  36. Adam Laytin (2001). Frantz Fanon and the Question of Palestinian Colonialism. Radical Philosophy Review 4 (1/2):193-204.score: 15.0
    The author argues that a Fanonian analysis offers a rich understanding of the complexity ofthe Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
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  37. Shannon Sullivan (2004). Book Review: Stacy Alaimo. Feminist Spaces: Undomesticated Ground: Recasting Nature as Feminist Space Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 2000; Elizabeth Grosz. Architecture From the Outside: Essays on Virtual and Real Space); and Radhika Mohanram. Black Body: Women, Colonialism, and Space. [REVIEW] Hypatia 19 (3):209-216.score: 15.0
  38. M. A. Jaimes* Guerrero (2003). ?Patriarchal Colonialism? And Indigenism: Implications for Native Feminist Spirituality and Native Womanism. Hypatia 18 (2):58-69.score: 15.0
  39. Nigel Gibson (2001). The Oxygen of the Revolution: Gendered Gaps and Radical Mutations in Frantz Fanon's a Dying Colonialism. Philosophia Africana 4 (2):47-62.score: 15.0
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  40. Sheldon Pollock (2002). Introduction: Working Papers on Sanskrit Knowledge-Systems on the Eve of Colonialism. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 30 (5):431-439.score: 15.0
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  41. Stephen Frosh (2013). Psychoanalysis, Colonialism, Racism. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 33 (3):141.score: 15.0
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  42. Masao Miyoshi (1993). A Borderless World? From Colonialism to Transnationalism and the Decline of the Nation-State. Critical Inquiry 19 (4):726.score: 15.0
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  43. Sheldon Pollock (2005). Working Papers on Sanskrit Knowledge-Systems on the Eve of Colonialism, II. Journal of Indian Philosophy 33 (1):1-1.score: 15.0
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  44. Mark Bradley (2009). Classics and Colonialism (L.) Hardwick, (C.) Gillespie (Edd.) Classics in Post-Colonial Worlds. Pp. Xvi + 422, Ills. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. Cased, £65. ISBN: 978-0-19-929610-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 59 (02):613-.score: 15.0
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  45. Yigal Bronner (2002). What is New and What is Navya: Sanskrit Poetics on the Eve of Colonialism. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 30 (5):441-462.score: 15.0
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  46. Daniel Carey & Lynn Festa (eds.) (2009). The Postcolonial Enlightenment: Eighteenth-Century Colonialism and Postcolonial Theory. OUP Oxford.score: 15.0
    Over the last thirty years, postcolonial critiques of European imperial practices have transformed our understanding of colonial ideology, resistance, and cultural contact. The Enlightenment has played a complex but often unacknowledged role in this discussion, alternately reviled and venerated as the harbinger of colonial dominion and avatar of liberation, as target and shield, as shadow and light. This volume brings together two arenas - eighteenth-century studies and postcolonial theory - in order to interrogate the role and reputation of Enlightenment in (...)
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  47. Aaron Sachs (2003). The Ultimate "Other": Post-Colonialism and Alexander Von Humboldt's Ecological Relationship with Nature. History and Theory 42 (4):111–135.score: 15.0
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  48. Robert Aman (2012). The EU and the Recycling of Colonialism: Formation of Europeans Through Intercultural Dialogue. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (9):1010-1023.score: 15.0
    The present essay focuses on problematizing the European Union's claim that intercultural dialogue constitutes an advocated method of talking through cultural boundaries—inside as well as outside the classroom—based on mutual empathy and non-domination. More precisely, the aim is to analyze who is being constructed as counterparts of the intercultural dialogue through the discourse produced by the EU in policies on education, culture and intercultural dialogue. Within the Union, Europeans are portrayed as having an a priori historical existence, while the ones (...)
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  49. Paul Gifford (2012). The Vanguard of Colonialism: Missionaries and the Frontier in Southern Africa in the Nineteenth Century. Constellations 3 (2).score: 15.0
    In this essay, I undertake an examination of how Christian missionary societies facilitated the spread of European ideals and belief systems within an African community, and how this spread both prepared and weakened the African polities for increasing contact with colonial authorities. I specifically explore the role missionaries took in everyday functioning of African chiefdoms and kingdoms through their roles as interpreters and diplomats. Missionaries played a role in shaping the day-to-day existence of the polities in which they were based, (...)
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  50. Mike W. Martin (1999). Good Fortune Obligates: Gratitude, Philanthropy, and Colonialism. Southern Journal of Philosophy 37 (1):57-75.score: 15.0
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