Search results for 'colour perception' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  90
    R. Beau Lotto & Dale Purves (2002). The Empirical Basis of Color Perception. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):609-629.
    Rationalizing the perceptual effects of spectral stimuli has been a major challenge in vision science for at least the last 200 years. Here we review evidence that this otherwise puzzling body of phenomenology is generated by an empirical strategy of perception in which the color an observer sees is entirely determined by the probability distribution of the possible sources of the stimulus. The rationale for this strategy in color vision, as in other visual perceptual domains, is the inherent ambiguity (...)
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  2. Steven Davis (ed.) (2000). Color Perception: Philosophical, Psychological, Artistic, and Computational Perspectives. New York: Oxford University Press.
    Color has been studied for centuries, but has never been completely understood. Digital technology has recently sparked a burgeoning interdisciplinary interest in color. The fact that color is a quality of perception rather than a physical quality brings up a host of interesting questions of interest to both artists and scholars. This volume--the ninth in the Vancouver Studies in Cognitive Science series--brings together chapters by psychologists, philosophers, computer scientists, and artists to explore the nature of human color perception (...)
     
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  3. Steven Davis (ed.) (2000). Color Perception: Philosophical, Psychological, Artistic, and Computational Perspectives. New York: Oxford University Press.
    Color has been studied for centuries, but has never been completely understood. Digital technology has recently sparked a burgeoning interdisciplinary interest in color. The fact that color is a quality of perception rather than a physical quality brings up a host of interesting questions of interest to both artists and scholars. This volume--the ninth in the Vancouver Studies in Cognitive Science series--brings together chapters by psychologists, philosophers, computer scientists, and artists to explore the nature of human color perception (...)
     
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  4. Mark Eli Kalderon (2015). Form Without Matter: Empedocles and Aristotle on Color Perception. OUP Oxford.
    Mark Eli Kalderon presents an original study of perception, taking as its starting point a puzzle in Empedocles' theory of vision: if perception is a mode of material assimilation, how can we perceive colors at a distance? Kalderon argues that the theory of perception offered by Aristotle in answer to the puzzle is both attractive and defensible.
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  5. Angus Gellatly (2002). Color Perception: Processing of Wavelength Information and Conscious Experience of Color. In Barbara Saunders & Jaap Van Brakel (eds.), Theories, Technologies, Instrumentalities of Color: Anthropological and Historiographic Perspectives. University Press of America 77-89.
     
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  6. Elof A. Carlson (2002). Color Perception: An Ongoing Convergence of Reductionism and Phenomenology. In Analecta Husserliana: The Yearbook of Phenomenological Research Vol Lxxvii. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Pub
     
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  7. David R. Hilbert (1987). Color and Color Perception: A Study in Anthropocentric Realism. Csli Press.
  8. Keith Allen (2009). Inter-Species Variation in Colour Perception. Philosophical Studies 142 (2):197 - 220.
    Inter-species variation in colour perception poses a serious problem for the view that colours are mind-independent properties. Given that colour perception varies so drastically across species, which species perceives colours as they really are? In this paper, I argue that all do. Specifically, I argue that members of different species perceive properties that are determinates of different, mutually compatible, determinables. This is an instance of a general selectionist strategy for dealing with cases of perceptual variation. According (...)
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  9. Jonathan Cohen (2007). A Relationalist's Guide to Error About Color Perception. Noûs 41 (2):335–353.
    Color relationalism is the view that colors are constituted in terms of relations to perceiving subjects. Among its explanatory virtues, relation- alism provides a satisfying treatment of cases of perceptual variation. But it can seem that relationalists lack resources for saying that a representa- tion of x’s color is erroneous. Surely, though, a theory of color that makes errors of color perception impossible cannot be correct. In this paper I’ll argue that, initial appearances notwithstanding, relationalism contains the resources to (...)
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  10.  93
    Yasmina Jraissati (2012). Categorical Perception of Color. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 12 (3):439-462.
    Why do we draw the boundaries between “blue” and “green”, where we do? One proposed answer to this question is that we categorize color the way we do because we perceive color categorically. Starting in the 1950’s, the phenomenon of “categorical perception” (CP) encouraged such a response. CP refers to the fact that adjacent color patches are more easily discriminated when they straddle a category boundary than when they belong to the same category. In this paper, I make three (...)
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  11. Edward Averill (2012). The Phenomenological Character of Color Perception. Philosophical Studies 157 (1):27-45.
    When an object looks red to an observer, the visual experience of the observer has two important features. The experience visually represents the object as having a property—being red. And the experience has a phenomenological character; that is, there is something that it is like to have an experience of seeing an object as red. Let qualia be the properties that give our sensory and perceptual experiences their phenomenological character. This essay takes up two related problem for a nonreductive account (...)
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  12.  47
    Yasmina Jraissati (2012). Categorical Perception of Color: Assessing the Role of Language. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 36 (3):439-462.
    Why do we draw the boundaries between “blue” and “green”, where we do? One proposed answer to this question is that we categorize color the way we do because we perceive color categorically. Starting in the 1950’s, the phenomenon of “categorical perception” (CP) encouraged such a response. CP refers to the fact that adjacent color patches are more easily discriminated when they straddle a category boundary than when they belong to the same category. In this paper, I make three (...)
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  13.  12
    Rainer Mausfeld & Dieter Heyer (eds.) (2003). Colour Perception: Mind and the Physical World. Oxford University Press.
    Colour has long been a source of fascination to both scientists and philosophers. In one sense, colours are in the mind of the beholder, in another sense they belong to the external world. Colours appear to lie on the boundary where we have divided the world into 'objective' and 'subjective' events. They represent, more than any other attribute of our visual experience, a place where both physical and mental properties are interwoven in an intimate and enigmatic way. -/- The (...)
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  14.  5
    Thomas Schmidt (2000). Visual Perception Without Awareness: Priming Responses by Color. In Thomas Metzinger (ed.), Neural Correlates of Consciousness. MIT Press 157--179.
  15.  35
    Austen Clark (1998). Color Perception (in 3000 Words). In George Graham & William Bechtel (eds.), A Companion to Cognitive Science. Blackwell
    A neighbor who strikes it rich evokes both admiration and envy, and a similar mix of emotions must be aroused in many neighborhoods of cognitive science when the residents look at the results of research in color perception. It provides what is probably the most widely acknowledged success story of any domain of scientific psychology: the success, against all expectation, of the opponent process theory of color perception. Initially proposed by a Ewald Hering, a nineteenth century physiologist, it (...)
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  16. Laurence T. Maloney (2003). Surface Color Perception and Environmental Constraints. In Rainer Mausfeld & Dieter Heyer (eds.), Colour Perception: Mind and the Physical World. Oxford University Press 279--300.
     
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  17.  3
    Carl Ratner (1989). A Sociohistorical Critique Of Naturalistic Theories Of Color Perception. Journal of Mind and Behavior 10 (4):361-372.
    Naturalistic experiments of color perception are critically evaluated. The review concludes that they fail to confirm a natural determination of color perception. Rather than demonstrating universal sensitivity to focal colors, the experiments actually yielded enormous cultural variation in response. This variation is interpreted as supporting a sociohistorical psychological explanation of color perception.
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  18.  26
    Rainer Mausfeld & Reinhard Niederée (2003). Can a Physicalist Notion of Color Provide Any Insight Into the Nature of Color Perception? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):41-42.
    Byrne & Hilbert conceive of color perception as the representation of a physical property “out there.” In our view, their approach does not only have various internal problems, but is also apt to becloud both the intricate and still poorly understood role that “ color ” plays within perceptual architecture, and the complex coupling to the “external world” of the perceptual system as an entirety. We propose an alternative perspective, which avoids B&H's misleading dichotomy between a purely subjective and (...)
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  19.  6
    C. R. Brian & F. L. Goodenough (1929). The Relative Potency of Color and Form Perception at Various Ages. Journal of Experimental Psychology 12 (3):197.
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  20.  4
    Nicola Bruno & Stephen Westland (2001). Colour Perception May Optimize Biologically Relevant Surface Discriminations – Rather Than Type-I Constancy. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (4):658-659.
    Trichromacy may result from an adaptation to the regularities in terrestrial illumination. However, we suggest that a complete characterization of the challenges faced by colour perception must include changes in surface surround and illuminant changes due to inter-reflections between surfaces in cluttered scenes. Furthermore, our trichromatic system may have evolved to allow the detection of brownish-reddish edibles against greenish backgrounds. [Shepard].
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  21. Maloney & Yang (2003). The Illuminant Estimation Hypothesis and Surface Colour Perception. In Rainer Mausfeld & Dieter Heyer (eds.), Colour Perception: Mind and the Physical World. OUP Oxford
     
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  22. R. Beau Lotto (2002). The Empirical Basis of Color Perception. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):609-629.
    Rationalizing the perceptual effects of spectral stimuli has been a major challenge in vision science for at least the last 200 years. Here we review evidence that this otherwise puzzling body of phenomenology is generated by an empirical strategy of perception in which the color an observer sees is entirely determined by the probability distribution of the possible sources of the stimulus. The rationale for this strategy in color vision, as in other visual perceptual domains, is the inherent ambiguity (...)
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  23. Christophe Guibal & Birgitta Dresp (2004). Interaction of Color and Geometric Cues in Depth Perception: When Does Red Mean "Near"? Psychological Research 69:30-40.
    Luminance and color are strong and self-sufficient cues to pictorial depth in visual scenes and images. The present study investigates the conditions Under which luminance or color either strengthens or overrides geometric depth cues. We investigated how luminance contrasts associated with color contrast interact with relative height in the visual field, partial occlusion, and interposition in determining the probability that a given figure is perceived as ‘‘nearer’’ than another. Latencies of ‘‘near’’ responses were analyzed to test for effects of attentional (...)
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  24. John Campbell (2005). Transparency Vs. Revelation in Color Perception. Philosophical Topics 33 (1):105-115.
    What knowledge of the colors does perception of the colors provide? My first aim in this essay is to characterize the way in which color experience seems to provide knowledge of colors. This in turn tells us something about what it takes for there to be colors. Color experience provides knowledge of the aspect of the world that is being acted on when we, or some external force, act on the color of an object and thus make a difference (...)
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  25. Gary Hatfield (1992). Color Perception and Neural Encoding: Does Metameric Matching Entail a Loss of Information? In David Hull & Mickey Forbes (eds.), PSA 1992: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association, Volume One: Contributed Papers. Philosophy of Science Association 492-504.
    It seems intuitively obvious that metameric matching of color samples entails a loss of information, for spectrophotometrically diverse materials appear the same. This intuition implicitly relies on a conception of the function of color vision and on a related conception of how color samples should be individuated. It assumes that the function of color vision is to distinguish among spectral energy distributions, and that color samples should be individuated by their physical properties. I challenge these assumptions by articulating a different (...)
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  26.  65
    Austen Clark (1985). Qualia and the Psychophysical Explanation of Color Perception. Synthese 65 (December):377-405.
    Can psychology explain the qualitative content of experience? A persistent philosophical objection to that discipline is that it cannot. Qualitative states or " qualia " are argued to have characteristics which cannot be explained in terms of their relationships to other psychological states, stimuli, and behavior. Since psychology is confined to descriptions of such relationships, it seems that psychology cannot explain qualia.
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  27.  22
    Zoltán Jakab (2005). Opponent Processing, Linear Models, and the Veridicality of Color Perception. In Andrew Brook (ed.), Cognition and the Brain. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 336--378.
  28. Rainer Mausfeld (1998). Color Perception: From Grassmann Codes to a Dual Code for Object and Illumination Colors. In W. Backhaus, R. Kliegl & J. Werner (eds.), Color Vision. Perspectives from Different Disciplines. De Gruyter
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  29.  6
    A. Bompas & J. K. O'Regan (2004). Induced Dependence of Colour Perception on Eye-Movements. In Robert Schwartz (ed.), Perception. Malden Ma: Blackwell Publishing 17-18.
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  30.  24
    Mohan Matthen (2005). Is Color Perception Really Categorical? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (4):504-505.
    Are color categories the evolutionary product of their usefulness in communication, or is this an accidental benefit they give us? It is argued here that embodiment constraints on color categorization suggest that communication is an add-on at best. Thus, the Steels & Belpaeme (S&B) model may be important in explaining coordination, but only at the margin. Furthermore, the concentration on discrimination is questionable: coclassification is at least as important.
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  31.  14
    Maurice Platnauer (1921). Greek Colour-Perception. Classical Quarterly 15 (3-4):153-.
    No one who has read the classics with any attention can fail to have been struck by certain oddities in both the Greek and Latin usage of epithets denoting colour. How really strange their application often is may have escaped general notice for three reasons: partly, it may be, because custom has staled their surprising character—phrases such as ‘the wine-dark sea’ having become, so to say, ‘household words’; partly because a natural and on the whole commendable diffidence prevents our (...)
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  32.  10
    Laurence T. Maloney (2003). Surface Color Perception in Constrained Environments. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):38-39.
    Byrne & Hilbert propose that color can be identified with explicit properties of physical surfaces. I argue that this claim must be qualified to take into account constraints needed to make recovery of surface color information possible. When these constraints are satisfied, then a biological visual system can establish a correspondence between perceived surface color and specific surface properties.
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  33.  9
    Stephen Grossberg (2005). Realistic Constraints on Brain Color Perception and Category Learning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (4):495-496.
    Steels & Belpaeme (S&B) ask how autonomous agents can derive perceptually grounded categories for successful communication, using color categorization as an example. Their comparison of nativism, empiricism, and culturalism, although interesting, does not include key biological and technological constraints for seeing color or learning color categories in realistic environments. Other neural models have successfully included these constraints.
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  34.  8
    Noud W. H. van Kruysbergen, Anna M. T. Bosman & Charles de Weert (1997). Universal Colour Perception Versus Contingent Colour Naming: A Paradox? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):209-210.
    Confusion concerning the issue of universality of colour categorization would greatly diminish if context regains its fundamental status in psychological research and we give up on the reductionist notion that biological universality implies behavioral universality.
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  35.  6
    Panos Athanasopoulos, Benjamin Dering, Alison Wiggett, Jan-Rouke Kuipers & Guillaume Thierry (2010). Perceptual Shift in Bilingualism: Brain Potentials Reveal Plasticity in Pre-Attentive Colour Perception. Cognition 116 (3):437-443.
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  36.  8
    Donald I. A. MacLeod (2003). New Dimensions in Color Perception. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):97-99.
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  37.  9
    Gary Hatfield (2003). Objectivity and Subjectivity Revisited: Colour as a Psychobiological Property. In Rainer Mausfeld & Dieter Heyer (eds.), Colour Perception: Mind and the Physical World. Oxford University Press 187--202.
    This chapter focuses on the notion of color as a property of the surfaces of objects. It considers three positions on what colors are: objectivist, subjectivist, and relationalist. Examination of the arguments of the objectivists will help us understand how they seek to reduce color to a physical property of object surfaces. Subjectivists, by contrast, seek to argue that no such reduction is possible, and hence that color must be wholly subjective. This chapter argues that when functional considerations are taken (...)
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  38.  7
    Karen B. Schloss (2015). Color Preferences Differ with Variations in Color Perception. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (10):554-555.
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  39.  44
    Allan Silverman (1989). Color and Color-Perception in Aristotle's de Anima. Ancient Philosophy 9 (2):271-292.
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  40. S. Fuller & M. Carrasco (2006). Exogenous Attention and Color Perception: Performance and Appearance of Saturation and Hue. Vision Research 46 (23):4032-4047.
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  41.  40
    Semir Zeki, S. Aglioti, D. McKeefry & G. Berlucchi (1999). The Neurological Basis of Conscious Color Perception in a Blind Patient. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 96 (24):14124-14129.
  42.  8
    Carl Simpson (1991). Colour Perception: Cross-Cultural Linguistic Translation and Relativism. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 21 (4):409–430.
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  43. Kathleen Akins & Martin Hahn (2000). Color Perception: Philosophical, Psychological, Artistic, and Computational Perspectives. New York: Oxford University Press.
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  44. Evan Thompson (2000). Color Perception: Philosophical, Psychological, Artistic, and Computational Perspectives. New York: Oxford University Press.
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  45.  3
    Karin Mogg, Andrew Mathews, Jon May, Matthew Grove, Michael Eysenck & John Weinman (1991). Assessment of Cognitive Bias in Anxiety and Depression Using a Colour Perception Task. Cognition and Emotion 5 (3):221-238.
  46.  8
    Sarah R. Allred & Jonathan I. Flombaum (2014). Relating Color Working Memory and Color Perception. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (11):562-565.
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  47.  4
    Elisabetta Lalumera (2014). Whorfian Effects in Color Perception: Deep or Shallow? Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 9 (1).
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  48. Emre Özgen & Ian R. L. Davies (2002). Acquisition of Categorical Color Perception: A Perceptual Learning Approach to the Linguistic Relativity Hypothesis. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 131 (4):477-493.
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  49. K. K. Bosse (1900). The Order of Development of Color Perception and of Color Preference in the Child. Psychological Review 7 (5):521-522.
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  50. C. L. Hardin (1989). David Hilbert, Color and Color Perception: A Study in Anthropocentric Realism Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 9 (2):47-49.
     
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