Search results for 'common-sense notion of explanation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Rainer Mausfeld (2012). On Some Unwarranted Tacit Assumptions in Cognitive Neuroscience. Frontiers in Cognition 3 (67):1-13.
    The cognitive neurosciences are based on the idea that the level of neurons or neural networks constitutes a privileged level of analysis for the explanation of mental phenomena. This paper brings to mind several arguments to the effect that this presumption is ill-conceived and unwarranted in light of what is currently understood about the physical principles underlying mental achievements. It then scrutinizes the question why such conceptions are nevertheless currently prevailing in many areas of psychology. The paper argues that (...)
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  2.  19
    Daniela Voss (2013). Deleuze's Rethinking of the Notion of Sense. Deleuze Studies 7 (1):1-25.
    Drawing on Deleuze's early works of the 1960s, this article investigates the ways in which Deleuze challenges our traditional linguistic notion of sense and notion of truth. Using Frege's account of sense and truth, this article presents our common understanding of sense and truth as two separate dimensions of the proposition where sense subsists only in a formal relation to the other. It then goes on to examine the Kantian account, which makes sense the superior transcendental condition of (...)
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  3.  9
    H. Redner (1991). Book Reviews : Denis J. Hilton, Ed., Contemporary Science and Natural Explanation: Common-Sense Conceptions of Causality. New York University Press, New York, 1988. Pp. Xii, 244, $45.00. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 21 (2):300-302.
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  4.  6
    Amit Kr Sew (1997). ''PF Strawson a Common-Sense Logician at This Stage Makes a Distinction Between the Notion of 'Entailment 'and the Notion of 'Presupposition'. L This Distinction Follows From Two Kinds of Logical Absurdities. Strawson Explains These Logical Absudities in This Way: There Are Two Statements, Say 5 Snd S'. Now If S'is the Necessary Condition for the Truth Simply of S and If One Asserts 'S'. [REVIEW] Indian Philosophical Quarterly 24 (2).
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  5.  5
    Adam Morton (1980). Frames of Mind: Constraints On The Common-Sense Conception Of The Mental. Oxford University Press.
    This book was an early contribution to the theory of mind debate, and was the origin of the term 'theory theory'. It defends a prototype simulation account.
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  6.  7
    Yūjirō Nakamura & John Krummel (2015). "The Logic of Place" and Common Sense. Social Imaginaries 1 (1).
    The essay is a written version of a talk Nakamura Yūjirō gave at the Collège international de philosophie in Paris in 1983. In the talk Nakamura connects the issue of common sense in his own work to that of place in Nishida Kitarō and the creative imagination in Miki Kiyoshi. He presents this connection between the notions of common sense, imagination, and place as constituting one important thread in contemporary Japanese philosophy. He begins by discussing the significance of place (basho) (...)
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  7.  52
    John Sutton (1995). Reduction and Levels of Explanation in Connectionism. In P. Slezak, T. Caelli & R. Clark (eds.), Perspectives on cognitive science: theories, experiments, and foundations. Ablex 347-368.
    Recent work in the methodology of connectionist explanation has I'ocrrsccl on the notion of levels of explanation. Specific issucs in conncctionisrn hcrc intersect with rvider areas of debate in the philosophy of psychology and thc philosophy of science generally. The issues I raise in this chapter, then, are not unique to cognitive science; but they arise in new and important contexts when connectionism is taken seriously as a model of cognition. The general questions are the relation between (...)
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  8. Robert Carry Osborne (2016). Debunking Rationalist Defenses of Common-Sense Ontology: An Empirical Approach. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 7 (1):197-221.
    Debunking arguments typically attempt to show that a set of beliefs or other intensional mental states bear no appropriate explanatory connection to the facts they purport to be about. That is, a debunking argument will attempt to show that beliefs about p are not held because of the facts about p. Such beliefs, if true, would then only be accidentally so. Thus, their causal origins constitute an undermining defeater. Debunking arguments arise in various philosophical domains, targeting beliefs about morality, the (...)
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  9. Glenn Carruthers (2012). The Case for the Comparator Model as an Explanation of the Sense of Agency and its Breakdowns. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):30-45.
    I compare Frith and colleagues’ influential comparator account of how the sense of agency is elicited to the multifactorial weighting model advocated by Synofzik and colleagues. I defend the comparator model from the common objection that the actual sensory consequences of action are not needed to elicit the sense of agency. I examine the comparator model’s ability to explain the performance of healthy subjects and those suffering from delusions of alien control on various self-attribution tasks. It transpires that the comparator (...)
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  10.  11
    Thomas Reid (1764). An Inquiry Into the Human Mind on the Principles of Common Sense. A. Millar, and A. Kincaid & J. Bell.
    On the Principles of Common Sense Thomas Reid. SECT. IX. Tltat there is a principle in human nature, from which the notion of this, as well as all other natural virtues or causes, is derived. In order to illustrate further how we come to conceive ...
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  11.  14
    Adam Kramer (2003). Common Sense Principles of Contract Interpretation (and How We've Been Using Them All Along). Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 23 (2):173-196.
    This article proposes to take seriously Lord Hoffmann's influential restatement of the rules of contractual interpretation. Consequently, it seeks to investigate the ‘common sense principles by which any serious utterance would be interpreted in ordinary life’, with the aid of theoretical insights from psycholinguistics, pragmatics and the philosophy of language. Such an investigation provides a principled explanation for some of the key features of our legal rules of interpretation, such as the objective principle and the importance of the factual (...)
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  12.  75
    L. Turner (1998). An Anthropological Exploration of Contemporary Bioethics: The Varieties of Common Sense. Journal of Medical Ethics 24 (2):127-133.
    Patients and physicians can inhabit distinctive social worlds where they are guided by diverse understandings of moral practice. Despite the contemporary presence of multiple moral traditions, religious communities and ethnic backgrounds, two of the major methodological approaches in bioethics, casuistry and principlism, rely upon the notion of a common morality. However, the heterogeneity of ethnic, moral, and religious traditions raises questions concerning the singularity of common sense. Indeed, it might be more appropriate to consider plural traditions of moral reasoning. (...)
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  13.  83
    Benjamin W. Redekop (2002). Thomas Reid and the Problem of Induction: From Common Experience to Common Sense. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 33 (1):35-57.
    By the middle of the eighteenth century the new science had challenged the intellectual primacy of common experience in favor of recondite, expert and even counter-intuitive knowledge increasingly mediated by specialized instruments. Meanwhile modern philosophy had also problematized the perceptions of common experience - in the case of David Hume this included our perception of causal relations in nature, a fundamental precondition of scientific endeavor.In this article I argue that, in responding to the ' problem of induction ' as advanced (...)
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  14. Alan Wade Davenport (1987). Evidence and Belief, Common Sense, and the Science of Mind in the Philosophy of Thomas Reid. Dissertation, The American University
    This dissertation attempts to expose the influence of Francis Bacon on the philosophy of Thomas Reid. Reid was a self-professed Baconian who viewed the human mind as a subject which was amenable to scientific investigation. Reid attempts to develop his own theory of mind according to the method of induction and experiment and general philosophy of science of Bacon. Further, Reid's use of the Baconian idols in his attack on the theory of ideas is explored. In addition, it is argued (...)
     
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  15. Pietro Salis (2015). Grasp of Concepts: Common Sense and Expertise in an Inferentialist Framework. In M. Bianca P. Piccari (ed.), Epistemology of Ordinary Knowledge. Cambridge Scholars Publishing 289-297.
    The paper suggests a distinction between two dimensions of grasp of concepts within an inferentialist approach to conceptual content: a common sense "minimum" version, where a simple speaker needs just a few inferences to grasp a concept C, and an expert version, where the specialist is able to master a wide range of inferential transitions involving C. This paper tries to defend this distinction and to explore some of its basic implications.
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  16.  12
    Sandeep Prasada & Elaine M. Dillingham (2009). Representation of Principled Connections: A Window Onto the Formal Aspect of Common Sense Conception. Cognitive Science 33 (3):401-448.
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  17.  24
    G. Hofer-Szabó, M. Rédei & and LE Szabó (1999). On Reichenbach's Common Cause Principle and Reichenbach's Notion of Common Cause. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 50 (3):377 - 399.
    It is shown that, given any finite set of pairs of random events in a Boolean algebra which are correlated with respect to a fixed probability measure on the algebra, the algebra can be extended in such a way that the extension contains events that can be regarded as common causes of the correlations in the sense of Reichenbach's definition of common cause. It is shown, further, that, given any quantum probability space and any set of commuting events in it (...)
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  18.  12
    G. Hofer-Szabo (1999). On Reichenbach's Common Cause Principle and Reichenbach's Notion of Common Cause. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 50 (3):377-399.
    It is shown that, given any finite set of pairs of random events in a Boolean algebra which are correlated with respect to a fixed probability measure on the algebra, the algebra can be extended in such a way that the extension contains events that can be regarded as common causes of the correlations in the sense of Reichenbach's definition of common cause. It is shown, further, that, given any quantum probability space and any set of commuting events in it (...)
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  19.  17
    M. Lorenz Moises J. Festin (2008). Making Sense of Common Good in Contemporary Society. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:171-176.
    The main purpose of the paper is to investigate the relevance and significance of the concept of common good in contemporary society. First, I make a brief historical remark about the philosophical concept of common good. I will argue that the concept is rooted in the ancient Greek philosophical understanding of society, namely as polis, whereby human being is thought to have an end that is not merely individual but also collective. I then discuss how societies have significantly changed over (...)
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  20.  14
    M. Lorenz Moises J. Festin (2008). Making Sense of Common Good in Contemporary Society. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:171-176.
    The main purpose of the paper is to investigate the relevance and significance of the concept of common good in contemporary society. First, I make a brief historical remark about the philosophical concept of common good. I will argue that the concept is rooted in the ancient Greek philosophical understanding of society, namely as polis, whereby human being is thought to have an end that is not merely individual but also collective. I then discuss how societies have significantly changed over (...)
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  21.  58
    Itay Snir (2015). Experts Of Common Sense: Philosophers, Laypeople And Democratic Politics. Humana.Mente Journal of Philosophical Studies 28:187-210.
    This paper approaches the question of the relations between laypeople and experts by examining the relations between common sense and philosophy. The analysis of the philosophical discussions of the concept of common sense reveals how it provides democratic politics with an egalitarian foundation, but also indicates how problematic this foundation can be. The egalitarian foundation is revealed by analyzing arguments for the validity of common sense in the writings of Thomas Reid. However, a look at three modern philosophers committed to (...)
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  22. Thomas Reid & Derek R. Brookes (1997). An Inquiry Into the Human Mind on the Principles of Common Sense : A Critical Edition. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  23.  23
    Ferenc Huoranszki (2002). Common Sense and the Theory of Human Behaviour. Philosophical Quarterly 52 (209):526-543.
    I offer an analysis of Reid's notion of the will. Naturalism in the philosophy of action is defined as the attempt to eliminate the capacity of will and to reduce volition to some class of appetite or desire. Reid's arguments show, however, that volition plays a particular role in deliberation which cannot be reduced to some form of motivation present at the time of action. Deliberation is understood as an action over which the agent has control. Will is a (...)
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  24.  6
    Sandra Jovchelovitch (2008). The Rehabilitation of Common Sense: Social Representations, Science and Cognitive Polyphasia. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 38 (4):431-448.
    In Psychoanalysis, its image and its public Moscovici introduced the theory of social representations and took further the project of rehabilitating common sense. In this paper I examine this project through a consideration of the problem of cognitive polyphasia, and the continuity and discontinuity between different systems of knowing. Focusing on the relations between science and common sense. I ask why, despite considerable evidence to the contrary, the scientific imagination tends to deny its relation to common sense and believe that (...)
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  25.  33
    Gary Hatfield (1990). Scottish Common Sense in Germany, 1768-1800: A Contribution to the History of Critical Philosophy by Manfred Kuehn. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 81 (3):574-575.
    A review of: Manfred Kuehn. Scottish Common Sense in Germany, 1768-1800: A Contribution to the History of Critical Philosophy. (McGill-Queen's Studies in the History of Ideas.) xiv + 300 pp., app., bibl., index. Kingston, Ont./Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press, 1987. $35.
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  26. Thomas Reid (1997). Thomas Reid, an Inquiry Into the Human Mind: On the Principles of Common Sense. Pennsylvania State University Press.
  27.  17
    Igor Hanzel (2012). Causation, Principle of Common Cause and Theoretical Explanation: Wesley C. Salmon and G. W. F. Hegel. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 43 (1):29-44.
    The aim of this article is to analyze the main contributions of Wesley C. Salmon to the philosophy of science, that is, his concepts of causation, common cause, and theoretical explanation, and to provide a critique of them. This critique will be based on a comparison of Salmon's concepts with categories developed by Hegel in his Science of Logic, and which can be applied to the issues treated by Salmon by means of the above given three concepts. It is (...)
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  28.  2
    Pietro Perconti (2016). The Psychologizing of the Psychological and the Return of Common Sense. Rivista Internazionale di Filosofia e Psicologia 7 (1):117-120.
    : According to Tim Crane, his version of psychologism is not based on the familiar opposition between conceptual analysis and empirical science. His point is not simply to consider phenomenological and empirical data in the science of the mind. Challenging the idea that investigation of the mind has to be understood “as an autonomous investigation solely into the concepts embodied in our psychological discourse”, Crane tries to argue for a more realistic picture of the mental. His rejection of “autonomous investigation”, (...)
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  29. Theo A. F. Kuipers & Anne Ruth Mackor (1995). Cognitive Patterns in Science and Common Sense: Groningen Studies in Philosophy of Science, Logic, and Epistemology. Rodopi.
    This collection of 17 articles offers an overview of the philosophical activities of a group of philosophers working at the Groningen University. The meta-methodological assumption which unifies the research of this group, holds that there is a way to do philosophy which is a middle course between abstract normative philosophy of science and descriptive social studies of science. On the one hand it is argued with social studies of science that philosophy should take notice of what scientists actually do. On (...)
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  30. Mortimer Jerome Adler (1970). The Time of Our Lives: The Ethics of Common Sense. Fordham University Press.
    Is it a good time to be alive? Is ours a good society to be alive in? Is it possible to have a good life in our time? And finally, does a good life consist of having a good time? Are happiness and “a good life” interchangeable? These are the questions that Mortimer Adler addresses himself to. The heart of the book lies in its conception of the good life for man, which provides the standard for measuring a century, a (...)
     
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  31. Thomas Reid (2007). An Inquiry Into the Human Mind on the Principles of Common Sense. In Elizabeth Schmidt Radcliffe, Richard McCarty, Fritz Allhoff & Anand Vaidya (eds.), Late Modern Philosophy: Essential Readings with Commentary. Blackwell Pub. Ltd.
    Thomas Reid , the Scottish natural and moral philosopher, was one of the founding members of the Aberdeen Philosophical Society and a significant figure in the Scottish Enlightenment. Reid believed that common sense should form the foundation of all philosophical inquiry. He criticised the sceptical philosophy propagated by his fellow Scot David Hume and the Anglo-Irish bishop George Berkeley, who asserted that the external world did not exist outside the human mind. Reid was also critical of the theory of ideas (...)
     
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  32. J. D. Trout (2002). Scientific Explanation and the Sense of Understanding. Philosophy of Science 69 (2):212-233.
    Scientists and laypeople alike use the sense of understanding that an explanation conveys as a cue to good or correct explanation. Although the occurrence of this sense or feeling of understanding is neither necessary nor sufficient for good explanation, it does drive judgments of the plausibility and, ultimately, the acceptability, of an explanation. This paper presents evidence that the sense of understanding is in part the routine consequence of two well-documented biases in cognitive psychology: overconfidence and (...)
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  33.  6
    Eric G. Cavalcanti & Raymond Lal (2014). On Modifications of Reichenbach's Principle of Common Cause in Light of Bell's Theorem. Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical 47 (42):424018.
    Bellʼs 1964 theorem causes a severe problem for the notion that correlations require explanation, encapsulated in Reichenbachʼs principle of common cause. Despite being a hallmark of scientific thought, dropping the principle has been widely regarded as much less bitter medicine than the perceived alternative—dropping relativistic causality. Recently, however, some authors have proposed that modified forms of Reichenbachʼs principle could be maintained even with relativistic causality. Here we break down Reichenbachʼs principle into two independent assumptions—the principle of common cause (...)
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  34.  62
    Paul Forster (2008). Neither Dogma nor Common Sense: Moore's Confidence in His 'Proof of an External World'. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (1):163 – 195.
    (2008). Neither Dogma nor Common sense: Moore's confidence in his ‘proof of an external world’1. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 16, No. 1, pp. 163-195.
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  35. Tetsushi Hirano, The Phenomenological Notion of Sense as Acquaintance with Background.
    In this paper, I will focus on the phenomenological notion of sense which Husserl calls in Ideen I noematic sense. My reading of Ideen I is based on the interpretation of noema as “object as it is intended”. This notion is developed from “filling sense” in LU. Similar to the Russellian “knowledge by acquaintance”, Husserl means by this notion the direct intuitive acquaintance with an intentional object. However, unlike Russell, Husserl doesn’t restrict this notion to sense (...)
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  36.  13
    R. I. Aaron (1958). The Common Sense View of Sense-Perception. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 58:1-14.
  37. James Woodward (2000). Explanation and Invariance in the Special Sciences. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 51 (2):197-254.
    This paper describes an alternative to the common view that explanation in the special sciences involves subsumption under laws. According to this alternative, whether or not a generalization can be used to explain has to do with whether it is invariant rather than with whether it is lawful. A generalization is invariant if it is stable or robust in the sense that it would continue to hold under a relevant if it is stable or robust in the sense that (...)
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  38.  4
    Emanuele Levi Mortera (2012). Stewart, Kant, and the Reworking of Common Sense. History of European Ideas 38 (1):122-142.
    Summary Dugald Stewart was the first metaphysician of any significance in Britain who attempted to take account of Kantian philosophy, although his analysis appears generally dismissive. Traditionally this has been imputed to Stewart's poor understanding of Kant and to his efforts to defend the orthodoxy of common sense. This paper argues that, notwithstanding Stewart's reading, Kant's philosophy helped him in a reconsideration and reassessment of common sense philosophy. In his mature works?the Philosophical Essays (1810), the second volume of the Elements (...)
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  39. Emanuele Levi Mortera (2012). Stewart, Kant, and the Reworking of Common Sense. History of European Ideas 38 (1):122-142.
    Dugald Stewart was the first metaphysician of any significance in Britain who attempted to take account of Kantian philosophy, although his analysis appears generally dismissive. Traditionally this has been imputed to Stewart's poor understanding of Kant and to his efforts to defend the orthodoxy of common sense. This paper argues that, notwithstanding Stewart's reading, Kant's philosophy helped him in a reconsideration and reassessment of common sense philosophy. In his mature works—the Philosophical Essays , the second volume of the Elements of (...)
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  40. Uriah Kriegel (2011). Two Defenses of Common-Sense Ontology. Dialectica 65 (2):177-204.
    In a series of publications, Eli Hirsch has presented a sustained defense of common-sense ontology. Hirsch's argument relies crucially on a meta-ontological position sometimes known as ‘superficialism’. Hirsch's argument from superficialism to common-sense ontology is typically resisted on the grounds that superficialism is implausible. In this paper, I present an alternative argument for common-sense ontology, one that relies on (what I argue is) a much more plausible meta-ontological position, which I call ‘constructivism’. Note well: I will not (...)
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  41.  34
    David Bloor (2008). Sichtbarmachung, Common Sense and Construction in Fluid Mechanics: The Cases of Hele-Shaw and Ludwig Prandtl. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (3):349-358.
    At the turn of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries a concerted effort was made in the discipline of fluid mechanics to make hidden and fleeting processes visible and to capture the results photographically. I examine two important cases. One concerns the photographs taken by H. S. Hele-Shaw in the 1890s showing the flow of a “perfect”, frictionless fluid. The other case deals with the photographs of boundary layer separation taken by Ludwig Prandtl. These were presented to the Third International Congress (...)
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  42.  16
    Erik Lundestad (2008). The Necessity of Pragmatism: Overcoming the Stalemate of Common Sense. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 6 (2):175-187.
    The paper argues that the relation between the philosophy of common sense and skepticism ought to be perceived of as the relation between the two horns of a dilemma. Each position, it is therefore said, is able to confront the other with a valid objection, something which implies that neither of the two positions are defensible as such. The dilemma is only resolved, it is argued, by the way in which a pragmatic approach to knowledge enables us to incorporate the (...)
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  43.  15
    Marieke Borren (2013). 'A Sense of the World': Hannah Arendt's Hermeneutic Phenomenology of Common Sense. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 21 (2):225 - 255.
    (2013). ‘A Sense of the World’: Hannah Arendt’s Hermeneutic Phenomenology of Common Sense. International Journal of Philosophical Studies. ???aop.label???. doi: 10.1080/09672559.2012.743156.
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  44.  22
    Andrew Robinson (2005). Towards an Intellectual Reformation: The Critique of Common Sense and the Forgotten Revolutionary Project of Gramscian Theory. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 8 (4):469-481.
    Abstract This article examines Gramsci?s theory of common sense and the implications of this theory for understanding social transformation and theorising political activity. Gramsci analyses common sense as a pervasive, though confused and contradictory, variety of ideology. For Gramsci the point is to challenge and question this pervasive ideology and its incoherence, confusion, passivity, and political conservatism. The task is to involve the construction of a new conception of the world, in opposition to existing belief?systems, and what he terms an (...)
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  45.  18
    Richard Fincham (2005). Refuting Fichte with "Common Sense": Friedrich Immanuel Niethammer's Reception of The. Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (3):301-324.
    Richard Fincham - Refuting Fichte with "Common Sense": Friedrich Immanuel Niethammer's Reception of the Wissenschaftslehre 1794/5 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 43:3 Journal of the History of Philosophy 43.3 301-324 Refuting Fichte with "Common Sense": Friedrich Immanuel Niethammer's Reception of the Wissenschaftslehre 1794/5 Richard Fincham Even a cursory comparison of Fichte's first published version of the Wissenschaftslehre of 1794/5 with Kant's critical works reveals a striking methodological difference. For, whereas Kant begins with the conditioned and ascends to the (...)
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  46.  9
    Douglas McDermid (2013). Ferrier and the Myth of Scottish Common Sense Realism. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 11 (1):87-107.
    Once a name to conjure with, Scottish idealist James Frederick Ferrier (1808–1864) is now a largely forgotten figure, notwithstanding the fact that he penned a work of remarkable power and originality: the Institutes of Metaphysic (1854). In ‘Reid and the Philosophy and Common Sense,’ an essay of 1847 which anticipates some of the central themes of the Institutes of Metaphysic, Ferrier presents an excoriating critique of Thomas Reid's brand of common sense realism. Understanding Ferrier's critique of Reid – its content, (...)
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    Joseph Z. Nitecki (1987). In Search of Sense in Common Sense Management. Journal of Business Ethics 6 (8):639 - 647.
    Popular and philosophical notions of common sense are briefly reviewed in terms of their possible applications in the theory of management. The concept of common sense is here interpreted as a secondary device in decision-making, and ought to be considered only in the context of a much more complex information-knowledge process. The knack of seeing things as they are, and doing things as they ought to be done. C. E. Stowe.
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  48.  1
    James Michelson (2004). Critique of (Im)Pure Reason: Evidence‐Based Medicine and Common Sense. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 10 (2):157-161.
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  49. Giovanni Stanghellini (2001). Psychopathology of Common Sense. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 8 (2-3):201-218.
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  50. Gábor Hofer-Szabó (2011). Bell(Δ) Inequalities Derived From Separate Common Causal Explanation of Almost Perfect EPR Anticorrelations. Foundations of Physics 41 (8):1398-1413.
    It is a well known fact that a common common causal explanation of the EPR scenario which consists in providing a local, non-conspiratorial common common cause system for a set of EPR correlations is excluded by various Bell inequalities. But what if we replace the assumption of a common common cause system by the requirement that each correlation of the set has a local, non-conspiratorial separate common cause system? In the paper we show that this move does not yield (...)
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