Search results for 'compartmentalization' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  26
    Cécile Rozuel (2011). The Moral Threat of Compartmentalization: Self, Roles and Responsibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 102 (4):685-697.
    Although most of us understand and accept that we play different roles in different settings, the moral implications of an unquestioned role-based world are serious. The prevalence of roles at the expense of ‘real’ people in organizations jeopardizes our ability to exercise full moral agency and ascribe moral responsibility, because ‘we were only fulfilling our role obligations’. This reasoning does not sustain ethical scrutiny, however, because individuals are always present behind the role, though they may lack awareness of their ability (...)
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  2.  26
    Mark A. Changizi & Darren He (2005). Four Correlates of Complex Behavioral Networks: Differentiation, Behavior, Connectivity, and Compartmentalization: Carving Networks at Their Joints. Complexity 10 (6):13-40.
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  3.  6
    Keith Breen (2005). The State, Compartmentalization and the Turn to Local Community: A Critique of the Political Thought of Alasdair MacIntyre. The European Legacy 10 (5):485-501.
    Alasdair MacIntyre condemns modern politics, specifically liberalism and the institutions of the liberal state, as irredeemably fallen. His core argument is that the liberal state encourages a disempowering ?compartmentalization? of people's everyday roles and activities that undermines the intersubjective conditions of human flourishing. MacIntyre's alternative is an Aristotelian politics centred on the notion of ?practice.? Defined by justice and solidarity, this politics can only be realized, he claims, within local communities which oppose and resist the dictates of the administrative (...)
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  4.  7
    R. Hengeveld & M. A. Fedonkin (2004). Causes and Consequences of Eukaryotization Through Mutualistic Endosymbiosis and Compartmentalization. Acta Biotheoretica 52 (2):105-154.
    This paper reviews and extends ideas of eukaryotization by endosymbiosis. These ideas are put within an historical context of processes that may have led up to eukaryotization and those that seem to have resulted from this process. Our starting point for considering the emergence and development of life as an organized system of chemical reactions should in the first place be in accordance with thermodynamic principles and hence should, as far as possible, be derived from these principles. One trend to (...)
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  5.  7
    I. Walker (1987). Compartmentalization and Niche Differentiation: Causal Patterns of Competition and Coexistence. Acta Biotheoretica 36 (4):215-239.
    The current major models of coexistence of species on the same resources are briefly summarized. It is then shown that analysis of supposedly competitive systems in terms of the physical four dimensions of phase-space is sufficient to understand the causes for coexistence and for competitive exclusion. Thus, the multiple dimensions of niche theory are reduced to factors which define the magnitudes of the phase-spatial system, in particular the boundaries of population spaces and of periods of activity. Excluding possible cooperative interaction (...)
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  6.  2
    Renée Roodbeen & Jan C. M. van Hest (2009). Synthetic Cells and Organelles: Compartmentalization Strategies. Bioessays 31 (12):1299-1308.
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  7.  8
    Christian A. Baumann & Alan R. Saltiel (2001). Spatial Compartmentalization of Signal Transduction in Insulin Action. Bioessays 23 (3):215-222.
  8. Vincent Géli & Michael Lisby (2015). Recombinational DNA Repair is Regulated by Compartmentalization of DNA Lesions at the Nuclear Pore Complex. Bioessays 37 (12):1287-1292.
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  9. Grace Wolf-Chase (2004). Toward Understanding Each Other: Bridging Gaps in the Science-and-Religion Dialogue. Zygon 39 (2):393-395.
    . The high degree of specialization in society and compartmentalization in education have resulted in increasing difficulty in communicating across different fields of study. I propose that these gaps in communication across disciplines must be addressed to ensure a fruitful ongoing science-and-religion dialogue.
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  10.  70
    Jason Brennan (2005). Choice and Excellence: A Defense of Millian Individualism. Social Theory and Practice 31 (4):483-498.
    Communitarians have argued against Millian individualism (ethical liberalism) by claiming that it leads to the compartmentalization of life, and thus inhibits virtue, that it causes alienation, and leads to what I call the problem of choice. Ethical liberals celebrate the free choice of a conception of the good life, but communitarians respond by posing a dilemma. Either the choice is made in reference to some given standard (a social or natural telos), in which case it is not free, or (...)
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  11.  35
    Lawrence A. Lengbeyer (2005). Selflessness & Cognition. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 8 (4):411 - 435.
    What are the cognitive mechanisms that underlie selfless conduct, both ‘thinking’ and unthinking? We first consider deliberate selflessness, a manner of selecting acts in which, in evaluating options, one expressly chooses not to weigh the potential consequences for oneself (though this formulation is seen as needing some qualification). We then turn to unthinking behavior in general, and whether we are responsible for it, as the foundation for analyzing the unthinking variety of selflessness. Using illustrative cases (Grenade Gallantry, The Well-Meaning Miner, (...)
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  12. Aaron Norby (2014). Against Fragmentation. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 2 (4):30-38.
    I criticize the idea that theories of ‘fragmented’ or ‘compartmentalized’ belief (as found in, e.g., Lewis 1982, Egan 2008) can help to account for the puzzling phenomena they are often taken to account for. After introducing fragmentationalism and a paradigm case that purportedly motivates it, I criticize the view primarily on the grounds that the models and explanations it offers are at best trivial—as witnessed by examples of over-generation—and should be seen as merely re-describing in figurative terms the phenomena it (...)
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  13. Eugene Sadler-Smith (2012). Before Virtue. Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (2):351-375.
    Biological, brain, and behavioral sciences offer strong and growing support for the virtue ethics account of moral judgment and ethical behavior in business organizations. The acquisition of moral agency in business involves the recognition, refinement, and habituation through the processes of reflexion and reflection of a moral sense encapsulated in innate modules for compassion, hierarchy, reciprocity, purity, and affiliation adaptive for communal life both in ancestral and modern environments. The genetic and neural bases of morality exist independently of institutional (...)
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  14.  20
    Joel Kupperman (1999). Learning From Asian Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    In an attempt to bridge the vast divide between classical Asian thought and contemporary Western philosophy, Joel J. Kupperman finds that the two traditions do not, by and large, supply different answers to the same questions. Rather, each tradition is searching for answers to their own set of questions--mapping out distinct philosophical investigations. In this groundbreaking book, Kupperman argues that the foundational Indian and Chinese texts include lines of thought that can enrich current philosophical practice, and in some cases provide (...)
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  15.  12
    V. Csanyi (1987). The Replicative Model of Evolution: A General Theory. World Futures 23 (1):31-65.
    Formulation of a general model of evolution is presented which is based upon the recognition of the ?biosocial? entity, that is the biosphere and human society, as a component?system. It can be demonstrated that the interactions of the components (moleculas, cells, organisms, ecosystems in the biological realms and people, artifacts and ideas in the societies) have replicative organization. We suggest an explanation for the spontaneous emergence of replicative function and organization, a process called autogenesis. During autogenesis, hierarchical levels of replicative (...)
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  16.  3
    James Liu (2015). Globalizing Indigenous Psychology: An East Asian Form of Hierarchical Relationalism with Worldwide Implications. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 45 (1):82-94.
    Globalization has changed almost every facet of life for people around the world, and today the flow of influence is no longer uni-directional. It is argued that East Asian societies are anchored in an indigenous form of hierarchical relationalism where social structure is produced by relational obligations of an ethical and normative nature that have slowed its traditional culture “melting into air” as prophesied by Marx. The successfully modernization of East Asia has involved hybridization, compartmentalization, and sequencing of traditional (...)
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  17.  8
    Gordon G. Gallup & Susan D. Suarez (1987). Antivivisection: Questions of Logic, Consistency, and Conceptualization. Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 7 (2):81-94.
    Questions of animal welfare and animal rights have captured a growing amount of public and political attention. Antivivisectionists have become increasingly critical of all animal research and behavioral research has been targeted as an issue of particular concern . Indeed, McArdle , who until recently was a ranking official of the Humane Society of the United States, advocates the 'complete elimination" of all psychological experimentation on animals . Are animal welfare and animal rights activists conscientiously concerned with the genuine well (...)
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  18.  42
    Ayfer Dost & Bilge Yagmurlu (2008). Are Constructiveness and Destructiveness Essential Features of Guilt and Shame Feelings Respectively? Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 38 (2):109–129.
    This paper involves a critical evaluation of a conceptualization of guilt and shame, which guides a number of research mainly in social psychology. In the contemporary literature, conceptualization of guilt and shame shows variation. In one of the leading approaches, guilt is regarded as an experience that targets behavior in evaluative thought and shame as targeting the self. According to this distinction, guilt has a constructive nature and it motivates the individual to take reparative actions, since it targets the behavior, (...)
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  19.  7
    Antoine Danchin (2007). Archives or Palimpsests? Bacterial Genomes Unveil a Scenario for the Origin of Life. Biological Theory 2 (1):52-61.
    The three processes needed to create life, compartmentalization, metabolism, and information transfer (memory stored in nucleic acids and manipulation operated by proteins) are embedded in organized genome features. The core of life puts together growth and maintenance (which drives survival), while life in context explores and exploits specific niches. Analysis of gene persistence in a large number of genomes shows that the former constitutes the paleome, which recapitulates the three phases of the origin of life: metabolism of small (...)
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  20.  17
    Douglas R. Anderson (2014). Roads to Divinity. The Pluralist 9 (1):87-96.
    Not long before he died, Henry David Thoreau was asked by a friend where religion was to be found in his writings. Thoreau responded by saying that his religiosity pervaded his works but that no one noticed it. This result was enabled by the cultural belief that religiosity entailed formal religion, creeds, fixed rituals, and overt discussions of God or gods. Thoreau’s point—a development of Emerson’s “Divinity School Address”—was to show the mistakenness of this compartmentalization of one’s religious life. (...)
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  21.  53
    Christopher Cherniak (1983). Rationality and the Structure of Memory. Synthese 57 (November):163-86.
    A tacit and highly idealized model of the agent's memory is presupposed in philosophy. The main features of a more psychologically realistic duplex (orn-plex) model are sketched here. It is argued that an adequate understanding of the rationality of an agent's actions is not possible without a satisfactory theory of the agent's memory and of the trade-offs involved in management of the memory, particularly involving compartmentalization of the belief set. The discussion identifies some basic constraints on the organization of (...)
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  22.  11
    Edward L. Schoen (1995). Galileo and the Church. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 2 (3):23-28.
    In his recent review of the Galileo affair, Pope John Paul II confidently proclaimed the intellectual autonomy of religion, comfortably affirming that the methods and ideas of religion are cleanly separable from those of the sciences. Unfortunately, a close review of the actual details of the Galilean controversy reveals that the lesson to be learned from that famous case is not one of sanitary intellectual compartmentalization, but one of entangling interdependencies among scientific, religious, and philosophical thought.
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  23.  37
    Montse Bordes (2001). Motivated Irrationality: The Case of Self-Deception. Crítica. Revista Hispanoamericana de Filosofía 33 (97):3-32.
    This paper inquires into the conceptual nature of self-deception. I shall afford a theory which links SD to wishful thinking. First I present two rival models for the analysis of SD, and suggest reasons why the interpersonal model is flawed. It is necessary for supporters of this model to work out a strategy that avoids the ascription of inconsistency to the self-deceiver in order to fulfill the requirements of the charity principle. Some objections to the compartmentalization strategy are put (...)
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  24.  3
    Benny Shanon (1993). Why Are We Conscious of Our Thoughts?: Or: Why Do We Think in Words ? Pragmatics and Cognitionpragmatics and Cognition 1 (1):25-49.
    The two questions that constitute the title of the paper are examined in the context of thought sequences, i.e., progressions of phrase-like expressions that spontaneously run through people 's minds. The analysis of a corpus of such sequences suggests that the articulation of thought in language affords fluidity that makes novelty possible. The articulation makes control possible, it lends momentum to thought, it presents alternative avenues for the further progression of thought, it renders thought into an activity akin to action (...)
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  25.  18
    Evangelos Voulgarakis, Introduction.
    It is proposed that the rhetoric of the discourse on science and Buddhism exhibits an often non-deliberate predisposition to establish and perpetuate a kind of compartmentalization which consigns both science and Buddhism to two different and irrelevant to each other realms in the minds of the wider, general, and non-scientifically involved Western Buddhist population. This emerges non-deliberately, for the purpose of avoiding any essential influence between the two subjects, despite the sincerely expressed aims of the proponents of science— Buddhism (...)
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  26.  3
    H. O. Kunkel (1988). Issues of Academic Disciplines in Agricultural Research. Agriculture and Human Values 5 (4):16-25.
    This essay examines the growing concerns about disciplinary narrowing occurring in agricultural research and the prospects of ameliorating the detrimental effects of disciplinary compartmentalization while capitalizing on its positive effects. The general model for agricultural science is that disciplinary groupings set the logic and standards for research; the disciplinary sciences are set in a hierarchical arrangement which allows communication from the relevant basic sciences through applied research into technology development and use and problem-solving. But agricultural research throughout most of (...)
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  27.  7
    Benny Shanon (1998). What is the Function of Consciousness? Journal of Consciousness Studies 5 (3):295-308.
    This paper proposes an answer to the title question on the basis of the analysis of empirical data -- a large corpus of what I call thought sequences, namely, trains of verbal-like expressions that spontaneously pass through people's minds. The analysis reveals several patterns that could not have occurred had thought not been conducted in a conscious manner. The feature that makes these patterns possible is the concreteness resulting from the articulation of thought in a particular medium: such articulation is (...)
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  28.  9
    Joshua Avery (2013). Protestant Epistemology and Othello's Consciousness. Renascence 65 (4):268-285.
    Factoring in the paradoxical relationship between faith and empiricism in Protestant epistemology, this essay attributes Othello’s disaster to his inability to take the leap of faith a Protestant sensibility demands. Protestantism inherits from Luther a rigid compartmentalization of the knowable and the mysterious. Othello, innately inclined and further conditioned to think in terms of “tangible evidence,” cannot imagine alternative possibilities. His handling of Cassio’s brawl shows how Othello requires that facts speak for themselves, and how he has no access (...)
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  29.  3
    Youzheng Li (2007). Distinguishing Reality From Discourse in Chinese. American Journal of Semiotics 23 (1/4):45-53.
    Interdisciplinary and cross-cultural semiotics will systematically change the present-day academic compartmentalization, especially impacting the constitutionof historiography. Emphasizing the distinction between reality and discourse this paper suggests a new historiographic view based on documents-centrism rather than periodical division. Then historians can more reasonably reach historical truth in a hermeneutic term. Following a semiotic rereading of a modern Chinese historical school Gu-Shi-Bian , a more serious comparative historical theory will be established in the global humanities. This modern critical Chinese historiography will (...)
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  30.  8
    Wallace Gray (1994). A Surprising Rediscovery and Partial Review of The Foundations of Belief by James Balfour. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 1 (4):6-9.
    Well known as the British politician responsible for the Balfour Declaration during World War I, James Balfour was also a philosopher. Long forgotten, his remarkable book The Foundations of Belief (1895) merits contemporary reassessment. Critical of modern compartmentalization, Balfour argues for an integration of religion, philosophy, and science---a position now often identified as postmodern. This article presents some of Balfour’s contemporary scholarly significance, and hints at his usefulness in undergraduate teaching.
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  31.  4
    James Conant (1991). On Bruns, on Cavell. Critical Inquiry 17 (3):616-634.
    Gerald Bruns’s “Stanley Cavell’s Shakespeare” is a consistently sympathetic and thoughtful response to Cavell’s difficult essays on Shakespeare.1 Nevertheless, while Bruns’s exposition of Cavell’s thought places it in a pertinently complex region of philosophical and literary concerns, it is hampered by its relative isolation from much of Cavell’s other work and from certain abiding conflicts within contemporary philosophy which inform that work. The resultant misunderstandings of Cavell’s thought are perhaps as inevitable as they are widespread—a function of the way in (...)
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  32.  10
    Diana Meyers, Part 2.3 Self-Direction and Personal Integration.
    Because it is characteristic of competencies that they have overarching functions, Meyers considers what the overarching function of autonomy competency might be. She defends a view of personal integration that does not entail counterproductive consistency or unity. She rejects several other solutions to this problem, including compartmentalization, sanity, happiness, and eccentric nonconformity.
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  33.  7
    David J. Hufford (1993). Epistemologies in Religious Healing. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 18 (2):175-194.
    Religious beliefs in miraculous healing through prayer remain prevalent in modern society. Most such beliefs do not conflict with medical advice but some do. Conventional views have considered these beliefs incompatible with rational modern thought, predicting their demise and explaining their persistence in terms of non-rational thinking, "special logics" and psychological compartmentalization. However, attention to the actual beliefs of individuals often reveals them to be rationally ordered and empirically founded. Further, they do not usually involve disbelief of medical knowledge. (...)
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  34.  6
    Jeanine Czubaroff (1997). The Public Dimension Of Scientific Controversies. Argumentation 11 (1):51-74.
    Acceptance of three tenets of the doctrine of scientific objectivity, namely, the tenets of consensus, compartmentalization, and ahistorical truth, undermines scientists‘ appreciation of the importance of scientific controversy and consideration of the policy and value implications of controversial scientific theories. This essay rejects these tenets and suggests scientists appreciate theoretical diversity, learn rational means for adjudicating value differences, and cultivate conversational as well as written forms of communication.
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  35.  1
    Éric Dacheux & Jean-Louis Laville (2003). Penser les interactions entre le politique et l'économie. Hermes 36:9-17.
    Researchers in political sciences, communication or sociology who are interested in the public sphere are not as concerned with a civil and solidarity-based economy perspective. Conversely, economists and sociologists working on the civil and solidarity-based economy often do not use the concept of the public sphere in their conceptual equipment. This type of compartmentalization is partly due to an opposition between work, defined as an alienating activity, and political activity defined as an action typical of the free man that (...)
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  36.  1
    A. de Swaan (2001). Dyscivilization, Mass Extermination and the State. Theory, Culture and Society 18 (2-3):265-276.
    Are massive violence and destruction a manifestation of ‘modernity’, even its very essence, or rather its total opposite: ‘a breakdown of civilization’? Although ostensibly Norbert Elias mainly occupied himself with the civilizing process, he was always, though mostly implicitly so, preoccupied with its complement and counterpart: violence, regression and anomie. In recent years, a number of his students have returned to these themes. Whether they wanted to or not, they were drawn into a debate that never subsided for long in (...)
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  37. Joel J. Kupperman (1999). Learning From Asian Philosophy. Oxford University Press Usa.
    In an attempt to bridge the vast divide between classical Asian thought and contemporary Western philosophy, Joel J. Kupperman finds that the two traditions do not, by and large, supply different answers to the same questions. Rather, each tradition is searching for answers to their own set of questions--mapping out distinct philosophical investigations. In this groundbreaking book, Kupperman argues that the foundational Indian and Chinese texts include lines of thought that can enrich current philosophical practice, and in some cases provide (...)
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