Search results for 'complex individuals' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Adam Morton (1975). Complex Individuals and Multigrade Relations. Noûs 9 (3):309-318.score: 90.0
    I relate plural quantification, and predicate logic where predicates do not need a fixed number of argument places, to the part-whole relation. For more on these themes see later work by Boolos, Lewis, and Oliver & Smiley.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Pierre M. Auger & Robert Roussarie (1994). Complex Ecological Models with Simple Dynamics: From Individuals to Populations. Acta Biotheoretica 42 (2-3).score: 84.0
    The aim of this work is to study complex ecological models exhibiting simple dynamics. We consider large scale systems which can be decomposed into weakly coupled subsystems. Perturbation Theory is used in order to get a reduced set of differential equations governing slow time varying global variables. As examples, we study the influence of the individual behaviour of animals in competition and predator-prey models. The animals are assumed to do many activities all day long such as searching for food (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. William J. Greenberg (1996). The Paradox of Identity. Epistemologia:207-226.score: 84.0
    Call a semantics for singular terms *extensionalist* if it embraces (1) and *classical* if it embraces (2). -/- 1. The meaning of a singular term is exhausted by its reference. 2. The reference of a singular term is an entity that is logically simple. -/- Call a semantics *adequate* if it distinguishes material identity (a = b) from formal identity (a = a). -/- Frege reacts to the inadequacy of classical extensionalist semantics by rejecting (1). This he does without a (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. R. Pierce (2010). Complex Calculations: Ethical Issues in Involving at-Risk Healthy Individuals in Dementia Research. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (9):553-557.score: 78.0
    In dementia research evidence is mounting that therapeutic strategies that target moderate and even mild Alzheimer's disease may be missing the ‘therapeutic window’. Given that the neuropathology that leads to Alzheimer's disease probably begins somewhere between 10 and 15 years before symptoms manifest, many believe that the optimal therapeutic strategy would target persons in the earliest phases of disease development or even earlier. This would include, for example, persons with prodromal Alzheimer's and even persons who are deemed at risk. Given (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Carl T. Bergstrom & Peter Godfrey-Smith (1998). On the Evolution of Behavioral Complexity in Individuals and Populations. Biology and Philosophy 13 (2):205-31.score: 64.0
    A wide range of ecological and evolutionary models predict variety in phenotype or behavior when a population is at equilibrium. This heterogeneity can be realized in different ways. For example, it can be realized through a complex population of individuals exhibiting different simple behaviors, or through a simple population of individuals exhibiting complex, varying behaviors. In some theoretical frameworks these different realizations are treated as equivalent, but natural selection distinguishes between these two alternatives in subtle ways. (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Miriam Kos, Danielle Van den Brink & Peter Hagoort (2012). Individual Variation in the Late Positive Complex to Semantic Anomalies. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 58.0
    It is well-known that, within ERP paradigms of sentence processing, semantically anomalous words elicit N400 effects. Less clear, however, is what happens after the N400. In some cases N400 effects are followed by Late Positive Complexes (LPC), whereas in other cases such effects are lacking. We investigated several factors which could affect the LPC, such as contextual constraint, inter-individual variation and working memory. Seventy-two participants read sentences containing a semantic manipulation (Whipped cream tastes sweet/anxious and creamy). Neither contextual constraint nor (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Olivier Rieppel (2013). Biological Individuals and Natural Kinds. Biological Theory 7 (2):162-169.score: 54.0
    This paper takes a hierarchical approach to the question whether species are individuals or natural kinds. The thesis defended here is that species are spatiotemporally located complex wholes (individuals), that are composed of (i.e., include) causally interdependent parts, which collectively also instantiate a homeostatic property cluster (HPC) natural kind. Species may form open or closed genetic systems that are dynamic in nature, that have fuzzy boundaries due to the processual nature of speciation, that may have leaky boundaries (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Lynn K. Nyhart & Scott Lidgard (2011). Individuals at the Center of Biology: Rudolf Leuckart's "Polymorphismus der Individuen" and the Ongoing Narrative of Parts and Wholes. With an Annotated Translation. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 44 (3):373 - 443.score: 46.0
    Rudolf Leuckart's 1851 pamphlet Ueber den Polymorphismus der Individuen (On the polymorphism of individuals) stood at the heart of naturalists' discussions on biological individuals, parts and wholes in mid-nineteenth-century Britain and Europe. Our analysis, which accompanies the first translation of this pamphlet into English, situates Leuckart's contribution to these discussions in two ways. First, we present it as part of a complex conceptual knot involving not only individuality and the understanding of compound organisms, but also the alternation (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Paul E. Bierly, Robert W. Kolodinsky & Brian J. Charette (2009). Understanding the Complex Relationship Between Creativity and Ethical Ideologies. Journal of Business Ethics 86 (1):101-112.score: 42.0
    The relationship between individuals’ creativity and their ethical ideologies appears to be complex. Applying Forsyth’s (1980, 1992) personal moral philosophy model which consists of two independent ethical ideology dimensions, idealism and relativism, we hypothesized and found support for a positive relationship between creativity and relativism. It appears that creative people are less likely than non-creative people to follow universal rules in their moral decision making. However, contrary to our hypothesis and the general stereotype that creative people are less (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. E. Sharon Mason & Peter E. Mudrack (1997). Do Complex Moral Reasoners Experience Greater Ethical Work Conflict? Journal of Business Ethics 16 (12-13):1311-1318.score: 42.0
    Individuals who disagree that organizational interests legitimately supersede those of the wider society may experience conflict between their personal standards of ethics and those demanded by an employing organization, a conflict that is well documented. An additional question is whether or not individuals capable of complex moral reasoning experience greater conflict than those reasoning at a less developed level. This question was first positioned in a theoretical framework and then investigated using 115 survey responses from a student (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Edward N. Zalta, The Theory of Relations, Complex Terms, and a Connection Between Λ and Ε Calculi.score: 42.0
    This paper introduces a new method of interpreting complex relation terms in a second-order quantified modal language. We develop a completely general second-order modal language with two kinds of complex terms: one kind for denoting individuals and one kind for denoting n-place relations. Several issues arise in connection with previous, algebraic methods for interpreting the relation terms. The new method of interpreting these terms described here addresses those issues while establishing an interesting connection between λ and ε (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Solomon R. Benatar (2002). The HIV/aIDS Pandemic: A Sign of Instability in a Complex Global System. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 27 (2):163 – 177.score: 42.0
    Intense scientific work on HIV/AIDS has led to the development of effective combination drug therapies and there is hope that effective vaccines will soon be produced. However, the majority of people with HIV/AIDS in the world are not benefiting from such advances because of extreme poverty. This article focuses on the pandemic as a reflection of a complex trajectory of social and economic forces that create widening global disparities in wealth and health and concomitant ecological niches for the emergence (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Jean Decety, Chenyi Chen, Carla Harenski & Kent A. Kiehl (2013). An fMRI Study of Affective Perspective Taking in Individuals with Psychopathy: Imagining Another in Pain Does Not Evoke Empathy. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 42.0
    While it is well established that individuals with psychopathy have a marked deficit in affective arousal, emotional empathy, and caring for the well-being of others, the extent to which perspective taking can elicit an emotional response has not yet been studied despite its potential application in rehabilitation. In healthy individuals, affective perspective taking has proven to be an effective means to elicit empathy and concern for others. To examine neural responses in individuals who vary in psychopathy during (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Paul E. Bierly Iii, Robert W. Kolodinsky & Brian J. Charette (2009). Understanding the Complex Relationship Between Creativity and Ethical Ideologies. Journal of Business Ethics 86 (1):101 - 112.score: 42.0
    The relationship between individuals' creativity and their ethical ideologies appears to be complex. Applying Forsyth's (1980, 1992) personal moral philosophy model which consists of two independent ethical ideology dimensions, idealism and relativism, we hypothesized and found support for a positive relationship between creativity and relativism. It appears that creative people are less likely than non-creative people to follow universal rules in their moral decision making. However, contrary to our hypothesis and the general stereotype that creative people are less (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Haridimos Tsoukas (2004). Complex Knowledge: Studies in Organizational Epistemology. OUP Oxford.score: 42.0
    In this book Haridimos Tsoukas, one of the most imaginative organization theorists of our time, examines the nature of knowledge in organizations, and how individuals and scholars approach the concept of knowledge. -/- Tsoukas firstly looks at organizational knowledge and its embeddedness in social contexts and forms of life. He shows that knowledge is not just a collection of free floating representations of the world to be used at will, but an activity constitutive of the world. On the one (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Wai-Ching Leung (2001). Should Screening of Student and Qualified Nurses for Bloodborne Infections Be Compulsory and Infected Individuals Excluded From Work? Nursing Ethics 8 (2):133-141.score: 42.0
    Policies on whether student and qualified nurses should be screened for bloodborne infections and whether infected individuals should be excluded from work must be based on sound ethical principles. Patients have rights, and nurses and employers have duties to respect these rights. However, nurses also have rights that must be respected by their employers and the State. Balancing these competing rights and duties is a complex procedure. In this article, these rights and duties are discussed and applied to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Peter Godfrey-Smith (1998). On the Evolution of Behavioral Heterogeneity in Individuals and Populations. Biology and Philosophy 13 (2):205-231.score: 42.0
    A wide range of ecological and evolutionary models predict variety in phenotype or behavior when a population is at equilibrium. This heterogeneity can be realized in different ways. For example, it can be realized through a complex population of individuals exhibiting different simple behaviors, or through a simple population of individuals exhibiting complex, varying behaviors. In some theoretical frameworks these different realizations are treated as equivalent, but natural selection distinguishes between these two alternatives in subtle ways. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Olivier Rieppel (2011). Species Are Individuals—the German Tradition. Cladistics 27 (6):629-645.score: 42.0
    The German tradition of considering species, and higher taxonomic entities, as individuals begins with the temporalization of natural history, thus pre-dating Darwin’s ‘Origin’ of 1859. In the tradition of German Naturphilosophie as developed by Friedrich Schelling, species came to be seen as parts of a complex whole that encompasses all (living) nature. Species were comprehended as dynamic entities that earn individuality by virtue of their irreversible passage through time. Species individuality was conceived in terms of species taxa forming (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Warren S. Brown & Kevin S. Reimer (2013). Embodied Cognition, Character Formation, and Virtue. Zygon 48 (3):832-845.score: 36.0
    The theory of embodied cognition makes the claim that our cognitive processes are, at their core, sensorimotor, situated, and action-relevant. Our mental system is built primarily to control action, and so mind is formed by the nature of the body and its interactions with the world. In this paper we will explore the nature of virtue and its formation from the perspective of embodied cognition. We specifically describe exemplars of the virtue of compassion (caregivers of individuals with developmental disabilities (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Arvid Kappas (2013). Social Regulation of Emotion: Messy Layers. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 36.0
    Emotions are evolved systems of intra- and interpersonal processes that are regulatory in nature, dealing mostly with issues of personal or social concern. They regulate social interaction and in extension, the social sphere. In turn, processes in the social sphere regulate emotions of individuals and groups. In other words, intrapersonal processes project in the interpersonal space, and inversely, interpersonal experiences deeply influence intrapersonal processes. Thus, I argue that the concepts of emotion generation and regulation should not be artificially separated. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Melanie Mitchell (2009). Complexity: A Guided Tour. Oxford University Press.score: 34.0
    What enables individually simple insects like ants to act with such precision and purpose as a group? How do trillions of individual neurons produce something as extraordinarily complex as consciousness? What is it that guides self-organizing structures like the immune system, the World Wide Web, the global economy, and the human genome? These are just a few of the fascinating and elusive questions that the science of complexity seeks to answer. In this remarkably accessible and companionable book, leading (...) systems scientist Melanie Mitchell provides an intimate, detailed tour of the sciences of complexity, a broad set of efforts that seek to explain how large-scale complex, organized, and adaptive behavior can emerge from simple interactions among myriad individuals. Comprehending such systems requires a wholly new approach, one that goes beyond traditional scientific reductionism and that re-maps long-standing disciplinary boundaries. Based on her work at the Santa Fe Institute and drawing on its interdisciplinary strategies, Mitchell brings clarity to the workings of complexity across a broad range of biological, technological, and social phenomena, seeking out the general principles or laws that apply to all of them. She explores as well the relationship between complexity and evolution, artificial intelligence, computation, genetics, information processing, and many other fields. Richly illustrated and vividly written, Complexity: A Guided Tour offers a comprehensive and eminently comprehensible overview of the ideas underlying complex systems science, the current research at the forefront of this field, and the prospects for the field's contribution to solving some of the most important scientific questions of our time. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Thomas Busey, Chen Yu, Dean Wyatte & John Vanderkolk (2013). Temporal Sequences Quantify the Contributions of Individual Fixations in Complex Perceptual Matching Tasks. Cognitive Science 37 (4):731-756.score: 34.0
    Perceptual tasks such as object matching, mammogram interpretation, mental rotation, and satellite imagery change detection often require the assignment of correspondences to fuse information across views. We apply techniques developed for machine translation to the gaze data recorded from a complex perceptual matching task modeled after fingerprint examinations. The gaze data provide temporal sequences that the machine translation algorithm uses to estimate the subjects' assumptions of corresponding regions. Our results show that experts and novices have similar surface behavior, such (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Donald A. Landes (2014). Individuals and Technology: Gilbert Simondon, From Ontology to Ethics to Feminist Bioethics. Continental Philosophy Review 47 (2):153-176.score: 34.0
    Two key themes structure the work of French philosopher of science Gilbert Simondon: the processes of individuation and the nature of technical objects. Moreover, these two themes are also at the heart of contemporary debates within Ethics and Bioethics. Indeed, the question of the individual is a key concern in both Virtue Ethics and Feminist Ethics of Care, while the hyper-technical reality of the present stage of medical technology is a key reason for both the urgency for and the success (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. William H. Lichte & R. Flanagan Gray (1955). The Influence of Overtone Structure on the Pitch of Complex Tones. Journal of Experimental Psychology 49 (6):431.score: 32.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. M. L. J. Wissenburg (2011). Parenting and Intergenerational Justice: Why Collective Obligations Towards Future Generations Take Second Place to Individual Responsibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (6):557-573.score: 30.0
    Theories of intergenerational obligations usually take the shape of theories of distributive (social) justice. The complexities involved in intergenerational obligations force theorists to simplify. In this article I unpack two popular simplifications: the inevitability of future generations, and the Hardinesque assumption that future individuals are a burden on society but a benefit to parents. The first assumption obscures the fact that future generations consist of individuals whose existence can be a matter of voluntary choice, implying that there are (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Robert Artigiani (2004). The Origins and Governance of Complex Social Systems. World Futures 60 (8):593 – 616.score: 30.0
    The new science of Complexity explains that limited knowledge prevents societies from predicting and controlling their developments. But Complexity further suggests that nature uses the limits of knowledge to evolve, which turns an apparent obstacle into an opportunity to reevaluate governmental institutions. As in nature, the limits of knowledge lead social systems to evolve by individuating, liberating, and empowering their members. Societies individuate and liberate their members to probe environments and exploit opportunities. Societies empower individuals to globalize their findings (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. J. Stuart Bunderson (2001). Normal Injustices and Morality in Complex Organizations. Journal of Business Ethics 33 (3):181 - 190.score: 30.0
    This paper applies theory and research examining errors in complex organizational systems to the problem of individual and collective morality in organizations. It is proposed that because of the nature of complex organizations, unjust outcomes can (and will) result from organizational actions even when all organization members have acted responsibly. The argument that complex organizations are therefore immoral is considered and rejected. Instead, the paper argues that morality in complex organizations begins with "heedful interrelating" among individual (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Leonid Grinin (2010). The Role of the Individual in History: A Reconsideration. Social Evolution and History 9 (2).score: 30.0
    This article is devoted to the significant at all times and sounding anew in every epoch problem of the role of an individual (also a Hero, Great Man) in history, including such an aspect as the role of an individual in the process of state formation and progress. It is argued that in the age of globalization, when the humankind has found itself at the new developmental turning point, in the epoch when the influence of various individuals could affect (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Soo Downe (2010). Beyond Evidence-Based Medicine: Complexity and Stories of Maternity Care. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (1):232-237.score: 30.0
    Despite the entrenched acceptance of normal science in health care, it appears that authoritative, positivist, linear, risk averse, certainty-based thinking can only get us so far along the route of optimum health. This paper examines labor and childbirth as a paradigm case of a complex adaptive system (CAS) and offers the example of techniques used in a master-level course on normal childbirth to illustrate how maternity care clinicians can be introduced to complexity-based thinking through reflexive analysis of real life (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Moulay Lhassan Hbid (forthcoming). Individual Based Model for Grouper Populations. Acta Biotheoretica.score: 30.0
    Dusky groupers ( Epinephelus marginatus ) are characterized by a complex sex allocation strategies and overexploitation of bigger individuals. We developed an individual based model to investigate the long-term effects of density dependence on grouper population dynamics and to analyze the variabilities of extinction probabilities as a result of interacting mortalities at different life stages. We conduct several simulations with different forms of sex allocation functions and different combinations of mortality rates. The model was parametrized using data on (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Christian L. Bonnet (1944). Note on the Thomistic Interpretation of Complex Individual Bodies. The Modern Schoolman 21 (2):101-107.score: 30.0
  32. Christian L. Bonnet (1944). The Unity of the Complex Individual Body. The Modern Schoolman 22 (1):33-43.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Brian Gordon & Georg Theiner (forthcoming). Scaffolded Joint Action as a Micro–Foundation of Organizational Learning. In Charles B. Stone & Lucas Bietti (eds.), Contextualizing Human Memory: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Understanding How Individuals and Groups Remember the Past. Psychology Press.score: 30.0
    Organizational learning, at the broadest levels, as it has come to be understood within the organization theory and management literatures, concerns the experientially driven changes in knowledge processes, structures, and resources that enable organizations to perform skillfully in their task environments (Argote and Miron–Spektor, 2011). In this chapter, we examine routines and capabilities as an important micro–foundation for organizational learning. Adopting a micro–foundational approach in line with Barney and Felin (2013), we propose a new model for explaining how routines and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. R. Alexander Bentley (2007). Social Complexity in Behavioral Models. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (1):19-19.score: 30.0
    Although the beliefs, preferences, and constraints (BPC) model may account for individuals independently making simple decisions, it becomes less useful the more complex the social setting and the decisions themselves become. Perhaps rather than seek to unify their field under one model, behavioral scientists could explore when and why the BPC model generally applies versus fails to apply as a null hypothesis. (Published Online April 27 2007).
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Michael Della Rocca (1996). Spinoza's Metaphysical Psychology. In Don Garrett (ed.). Cambridge Univ Pr. 192--266.score: 30.0
    This paper analyzes and evaluates Spinoza way of carrying out his naturalistic program in psychology. I begin by examining Spinoza’s general metaphysical doctrine according to which each thing strives to preserve itself. While this doctrine cannot be true in its unqualified form, it does receive some support from Spinoza’s views on the nature of complex individuals. I then explore the problematic way in which Spinoza applies the doctrine of self -preservation to human psychology. The paper goes on the (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Mana Kobuchi-Philip (2007). Individual-Denoting Classifiers. Natural Language Semantics 15 (2):95-130.score: 30.0
    This paper discusses Japanese numeral quantifiers that are used to count individuals, rather than quantities, of a substance, and which may occur either as floated or non-floated quantifiers. It is argued that such morphologically complex numeral quantifiers (NQs) are semantically complex as well: The numeral within the NQ is the quantifier itself, the classifier its domain of quantification. The proposed analysis offers a unified semantic account of floated and non-floated NQs that adheres closely to their surface morphology (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. David Midgley (2006). Intersubjectivity and Collective Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 13 (5):99-109.score: 28.0
    This paper explores some connections between the philosophically central topic of intersubjectivity highlighted in John Ziman's article and the notion of collective consciousness, which has received very little formal attention in mainstream philosophy. The deconstruction of the Cartesian model of isolated spheres of consciousness which the intersubjective viewpoint brings about is supported by considerations from Kant's critical account of transcendental psychology. The phenomenon of empathy, an essential component in the achievement of intersubjective consensus, is related to the possibility of shared (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Lindsay J. Thompson (2010). The Global Moral Compass for Business Leaders. Journal of Business Ethics 93 (1):15 - 32.score: 28.0
    Globalization, with its undisputed benefits, also presents complex moral challenges that business leaders cannot ignore. Some of this moral complexity is attributable to the scope and nature of specific issues like climate change, intellectual property rights, economic inequity, and human rights. More difficult aspects of moral complexity are the structure and dynamics of human moral judgment and the amplified universe of global stakeholders with competing value claims and value systems whose interests must be considered and often included in the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Mollie Painter-Morland (2008). Systemic Leadership and the Emergence of Ethical Responsiveness. Journal of Business Ethics 82 (2):509 - 524.score: 28.0
    The author of this paper argues that the responsibility to nurture and encourage a relationally responsive ethical attitude among the members of an organizational system is shared by all who participate in it. In the dynamic environment of a complex adaptive organizational system where it is impossible to anticipate and legislate for every potential circumstantial contingency, creating and sustaining relationships of trust has to be a systemic capacity of the entire organization. Leadership is socially constructed, as the need for (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. José Luis Villacañas (2010). Lo común en Kant (Comentarios al margen del texto de Kersting). Logos. Anales Del Seminario de Metafísica 42 (1):89 - 104.score: 28.0
    Kant´s notion of community is more complex than what is suggested by a hasty political thought. In the alternative between the two possible meanings of this notion, communio and commercium (respectively referring to a predominant substantial community and a reciprocal interaction among individuals substantial in themselves), Kant advocates for the latter. However, we cannot deduce from this that the kantian stance should be equated without further ado with that of those who defend liberalism, as opposed to the communitarians. (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. David J. Kelly, Rachael E. Jack, Sebastien Miellet, Emanuele De Luca, Kay Foreman & Roberto Caldara (2011). Social Experience Does Not Abolish Cultural Diversity in Eye Movements. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 28.0
    Adults from Eastern (e.g., China) and Western (e.g., USA) cultural groups display pronounced differences in a range of visual processing tasks. For example, the eye movement strategies used for information extraction during a variety of face processing tasks (e.g., identification and facial expressions of emotion categorization) differs across cultural groups. Currently, many of the differences reported in previous studies have asserted that culture itself is responsible for shaping the way we process visual information, yet this has never been directly investigated. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Ronald Dworkin, Dworkin Versus Equality of Welfare Dick Arneson.score: 24.0
    Dworkin wonders, in so far as we might be for equality, to some degree, what would we be for? He thinks equality is a complex, multi-faceted ideal. One facet is distributional equality. Here the question is, concerning money and other resources to be privately owned by individuals, when is the distribution an equal one? Equality of welfare “holds that a distributional scheme treats people as equals when it distributes or transfers resources among them until no further transfer would (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Michael Blake & Mathias Risse (2009). Is There a Human Right to Free Movement? Immigration and Original Ownership of the Earth. Notre Dame Journal of Law Ethics and Public Policy 23 (133):166.score: 24.0
    1. Among the most striking features of the political arrangements on this planet is its division into sovereign states.1 To be sure, in recent times, globalization has woven together the fates of communities and individuals in distant parts of the world in complex ways. It is partly for this reason that now hardly anyone champions a notion of sovereignty that would entirely discount a state’s liability the effects that its actions would have on foreign nationals. Still, state sovereignty (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Heidi Tiedke (2011). Proper Names and Their Fictional Uses. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 89 (4):707 - 726.score: 24.0
    Fictional names present unique challenges for semantic theories of proper names, challenges strong enough to warrant an account of names different from the standard treatment. The theory developed in this paper is motivated by a puzzle that depends on four assumptions: our intuitive assessment of the truth values of certain sentences, the most straightforward treatment of their syntactic structure, semantic compositionality, and metaphysical scruples strong enough to rule out fictional entities, at least. It is shown that these four assumptions, taken (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Bryan Paton, Jakob Hohwy & Peter Enticott (2011). The Rubber Hand Illusion Reveals Proprioceptive and Sensorimotor Differences in Autism Spectrum Disorders. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders.score: 24.0
    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterised by differences in unimodal and multimodal sensory and proprioceptive processing, with complex biases towards local over global processing. Many of these elements are implicated in versions of the rubber hand illusion (RHI), which were therefore studied in high-functioning individuals with ASD and a typically developing control group. Both groups experienced the illusion. A number of differences were found, related to proprioception and sensorimotor processes. The ASD group showed reduced sensitivity to visuotactile-proprioceptive discrepancy (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Lawrence W. Barsalou (1999). Perceptual Symbol Systems. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):577-660.score: 24.0
    Prior to the twentieth century, theories of knowledge were inherently perceptual. Since then, developments in logic, statis- tics, and programming languages have inspired amodal theories that rest on principles fundamentally different from those underlying perception. In addition, perceptual approaches have become widely viewed as untenable because they are assumed to implement record- ing systems, not conceptual systems. A perceptual theory of knowledge is developed here in the context of current cognitive science and neuroscience. During perceptual experience, association areas in the (...)
    Direct download (17 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Ghislain Guigon (2011). Spinoza on Composition and Priority. In Philip Goff (ed.), Spinoza on Monism. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 24.0
    This article has two goals: a historical and a speculative one. The historical goal is to offer a coherent account of Spinoza’s view on mereological composition. The speculative goal is to show that Spinoza’s substance monism is distinct from versions of monism that are currently defended in metaphysics and that it deserves the attention of contemporary metaphysicians. Regarding the second goal, two versions of monism are currently defended and discussed in contemporary metaphysics: existence monism according to which there actually exists (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Larry S. Temkin (1986). Inequality. Philosophy and Public Affairs 15 (2):99-121.score: 24.0
    In this book Larry Temkin examines the concepts of equality and inequality, and addresses one particular question in depth: how can we judge between different sorts of inequality? When is one inequality worse than another? Temkin shows that there are many different factors underlying and influencing our egalitarian judgements and that the notion of inequality is surprisingly complex. He looks at inequality as applied to individuals and to groups, and at the standard measures of inequality employed by economists (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Pierre Pica & Alain Lecomte (2008). Theoretical Implications of the Study of Numbers and Numerals in Mundurucu. Philosophical Psychology 21 (4):507 – 522.score: 24.0
    Developing earlier studies of the system of numbers in Mundurucu, this paper argues that the Mundurucu numeral system is far more complex than usually assumed. The Mundurucu numeral system provides indirect but insightful arguments for a modular approach to numbers and numerals. It is argued that distinct components must be distinguished, such as a system of representation of numbers in the format of internal magnitudes, a system of representation for individuals and sets, and one-to-one correspondences between the numerosity (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Kieran Mathieson (2007). Towards a Design Science of Ethical Decision Support. Journal of Business Ethics 76 (3):269 - 292.score: 24.0
    Ethical decision making involves complex emotional, cognitive, social, and philosophical challenges. Even if someone wants to be ethical, he or she may not have clearly articulated what that means, or know how to go about making a decision consistent with his or her values. Information technology may be able to help. A decision support system could offer individuals and groups some guidance, assisting them in making a decision that reflects their underlying values. The first step towards a design (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000