Search results for 'composition' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Daniel Z. Korman & Chad Carmichael, Composition (Draft: 9/29/15). Oxford Handbooks Online.
    When some objects are the parts of another object, they compose that object and that object is composite. This article is intended as an introduction to the central questions about composition and a highly selective overview of various answers to those questions. In §1, we review some formal features of parthood that are important for understanding the nature of composition. In §2, we consider some answers to the question: which pluralities of objects together compose something? As we will (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Daniel Z. Korman & Chad Carmichael (forthcoming). What Do the Folk Think About Composition and Does It Matter? In David Rose (ed.), Experimental Philosophy and Metaphysics. Bloomsbury
    Rose and Schaffer (forthcoming) argue that teleological thinking has a substantial influence on folk intuitions about composition. They take this to show (i) that we should not rely on folk intuitions about composition and (ii) that we therefore should not reject theories of composition on the basis of intuitions about composition. We cast doubt on the teleological interpretation of folk judgments about composition; we show how their debunking argument can be resisted, even on the assumption (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Chad Carmichael (2015). Toward a Commonsense Answer to the Special Composition Question. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 93 (3):475-490.
    The special composition question is the question, ‘When do some things compose something?’ The answers to this question in the literature have largely been at odds with common sense, either by allowing that any two things compose something, or by denying the existence of most ordinary composite objects. I propose a new ‘series-style’ answer to the special composition question that accords much more closely with common sense, and I defend this answer from van Inwagen's objections. Specifically, I will (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Einar Duenger Bohn (forthcoming). Unrestricted Composition as Identity. In Donald Baxter & Aaron Cotnoir (eds.), Composition as Identity. Oxford University Press
    In this paper I argue that composition as identity entails unrestricted composition. I also briefly consider a new take on the special composition question.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  5. Stephen Bear, Noushi Rahman & Corinne Post (2010). The Impact of Board Diversity and Gender Composition on Corporate Social Responsibility and Firm Reputation. Journal of Business Ethics 97 (2):207 - 221.
    This article explores how the diversity of board resources and the number of women on boards affect firms' corporate social responsibility (CSR) ratings, and how, in turn, CSR influences corporate reputation. In addition, this article examines whether CSR ratings mediate the relationships among board resource diversity, gender composition, and corporate reputation. The OLS regression results using lagged data for independent and control variables were statistically significant for the gender composition hypotheses, but not for the resource diversitybased hypotheses. CSR (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   42 citations  
  6. Ned Markosian (1998). Brutal Composition. Philosophical Studies 92 (3):211 - 249.
    According to standard, pre-philosophical intuitions, there are many composite objects in the physical universe. There is, for example, my bicycle, which is composed of various parts - wheels, handlebars, molecules, atoms, etc. Recently, a growing body of philosophical literature has concerned itself with questions about the nature of composition.1 The main question that has been raised about composition is, roughly, this: Under what circumstances do some things compose, or add up to, or form, a single object? It turns (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   46 citations  
  7. Paul Silva Jr (2013). Ordinary Objects and Series-Style Answers to the Special Composition Question. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 94 (1):69-88.
    The special composition question asks, roughly, under what conditions composition occurs. The common sense view is that composition only occurs among some things and that all and only ‘ordinary objects’ exist. Peter van Inwagen has marshaled a devastating argument against this view. The common sense view appears to commit one to giving what van Inwagen calls a ‘series-style answer’ to the special composition question, but van Inwagen argues that series-style answers are impossible because they are inconsistent (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  90
    Bryan Frances (forthcoming). Ontology, Composition, Quantification, and Action. Analysis:anw020.
    The literature on material composition has largely ignored the composition of actions and events. I argue that this is a mistake. I present a set of individually plausible yet jointly inconsistent claims regarding the connection between quantification and existence, the composition of physical entities, and the logical forms of action sentences.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Ross P. Cameron (2007). The Contingency of Composition. Philosophical Studies 136 (1):99-121.
    There is widespread disagreement as to what the facts are concerning just when a collection of objects composes some further object; but there is widespread agreement that, whatever those facts are, they are necessary. I am unhappy to simply assume this, and in this paper I ask whether there is reason to think that the facts concerning composition hold necessarily. I consider various reasons to think so, but find fault with each of them. I examine the theory of (...) as identity, but argue that the version of this doctrine that entails universalism is implausible. I consider the claim that the a priority of such facts leads to their necessity, but give a defence of substantial contingent a priori truths. I ask whether the contingency of such facts would lead to unwelcome possibilities, but argue that the worrying looking possibilities can be blocked if it is desired. Next, I argue against the thought that the Lewis-Sider argument against restricted composition might give us reason to accept the necessity of universalism. Lastly, I respond to two objections from the 2006 BSPC. I conclude in favour of the contingency of the facts concerning when some things compose some thing. (shrink)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   37 citations  
  10.  94
    Einar Duenger Bohn (forthcoming). Composition as Identity and Plural Cantor's Theorem. Logic and Logical Philosophy.
    I argue that Composition as Identity blocks the plural version of Cantor's Theorem, and that therefore the plural version of Cantor's Theorem can no longer be uncritically appealed to. As an example, I show how this result blocks a recent argument by Hawthorne and Uzquiano.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  17
    Jason Q. Zhang, Hong Zhu & Hung-bin Ding (2013). Board Composition and Corporate Social Responsibility: An Empirical Investigation in the Post Sarbanes-Oxley Era. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 114 (3):381-392.
    Although the composition of the board of directors has important implications for different aspects of firm performance, prior studies tend to focus on financial performance. The effects of board composition on corporate social responsibility (CSR) performance remain an under-researched area, particularly in the period following the enactment of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (SOX). This article specifically examines two important aspects of board composition (i.e., the presence of outside directors and the presence of women directors) and their (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  12. Phillip Bricker (2015). Composition as a Kind of Identity. Inquiry 59 (3):264-294.
    Composition as identity, as I understand it, is a theory of the composite structure of reality. The theory’s underlying logic is irreducibly plural; its fundamental primitive is a generalized identity relation that takes either plural or singular arguments. Strong versions of the theory that incorporate a generalized version of the indiscernibility of identicals are incompatible with the framework of plural logic, and should be rejected. Weak versions of the theory that are based on the idea that composition is (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Chad Carmichael (2011). Vague Composition Without Vague Existence. Noûs 45 (2):315-327.
    David Lewis (1986) criticizes moderate views of composition on the grounds that a restriction on composition must be vague, and vague composition leads, via a precisificational theory of vagueness, to an absurd vagueness of existence. I show how to resist this argument. Unlike the usual resistance, however, I do not jettison precisificational views of vagueness. Instead, I blur the connection between composition and existence that Lewis assumes. On the resulting view, in troublesome cases of vague (...), there is an object, which definitely exists, about which it is vague whether the relevant borderline parts compose it. (shrink)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  14. Daniel Z. Korman (2007). Unrestricted Composition and Restricted Quantification. Philosophical Studies 140 (3):319-334.
    Many of those who accept the universalist thesis that mereological composition is unrestricted also maintain that the folk typically restrict their quantifiers in such a way as to exclude strange fusions when they say things that appear to conflict with universalism. Despite its prima facie implausibility, there are powerful arguments for universalism. By contrast, there is remarkably little evidence for the thesis that strange fusions are excluded from the ordinary domain of quantification. Furthermore, this reconciliatory strategy seems hopeless when (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  15. Achille C. Varzi (2008). The Extensionality of Parthood and Composition. Philosophical Quarterly 58 (1):108–133.
    I focus on three mereological principles: the Extensionality of Parthood (EP), the Uniqueness of Composition (UC), and the Extensionality of Composition (EC). These principles are not equivalent. Nonetheless, they are closely related (and often equated) as they all reflect the basic nominalistic dictum, No difference without a difference maker. And each one of them—individually or collectively—has been challenged on philosophical grounds. In the first part I argue that such challenges do not quite threaten EP insofar as they are (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  16.  18
    Olivier Massin (forthcoming). The Composition of Forces. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science:axv048.
    This paper defends a realist account of the composition of Newtonian forces, dubbed ‘residualism’. According to residualism, the resultant force acting on a body is identical to the component forces acting on it that do not prevent each other from bringing about its acceleration. Several reasons to favor residualism over alternative accounts of the composition of forces are advanced. (i) Residualism reconciles realism about component forces with realism about resultant forces while avoiding any threat of causal overdetermination. (ii) (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  21
    Jonathan Cottrell (2015). Minds, Composition, and Hume's Skepticism in the Appendix. Philosophical Review 124 (4):533-569.
    This essay gives a new interpretation of Hume's second thoughts about minds in the Appendix, based on a new interpretation of his view of composition. In Book 1 of the Treatise, Hume argued that, as far as we can conceive it, a mind is a whole composed by all its perceptions. But—this essay argues—he also held that several perceptions form a whole only if the mind to which they belong supplies a “connexion” among them. In order to do so, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Katherine Hawley (2006). Principles of Composition and Criteria of Identity. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 84 (4):481 – 493.
    I argue that, despite van Inwagen’s pessimism about the task, it is worth looking for answers to his General Composition Question. Such answers or ‘principles of composition’ tell us about the relationship between an object and its parts. I compare principles of composition with criteria of identity, arguing that, just as different sorts of thing satisfy different criteria of identity, they may satisfy different principles of composition. Variety in criteria of identity is not taken to reflect (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  19.  25
    Timothy McCarthy (2015). A Note on Unrestricted Composition. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 4 (3):202-211.
    I discuss a general limitative consequence of the unrestricted mereological composition thesis. The unrestricted composition thesis, which is roughly the assertion that every plurality of objects possesses a fusion or sum, is shown to be in conflict with general existence-conditions for certain categories of mereologically non-composite objects. The conclusion is that the unrestricted composition thesis, which is a maximizing principle about what aggregates exist, places sharp limits on what unaggregated items can exist.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  83
    Joshua Spencer (2013). Strong Composition as Identity and Simplicity. Erkenntnis 78 (5):1177-1184.
    The general composition question asks “what are the necessary and jointly sufficient conditions any xs and any y must satisfy in order for it to be true that those xs compose that y?” Although this question has received little attention, there is an interesting and theoretically fruitful answer. Namely, strong composition as identity (SCAI): necessarily, for any xs and any y, those xs compose y iff those xs are identical to y. SCAI is theoretically fruitful because if it (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  21. Rem B. Edwards (1968). Composition and the Cosmological Argument. Mind 77 (305):115-117.
    This article argues that not all arguments from parts to wholes commit the informal logical fallacy of composition,and especially not the cosmological argument for God which moves from the contingent existence of all the parts of the cosmos to the contingent existence of the whole.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  85
    Uriah Kriegel (2008). Composition as a Secondary Quality. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 89 (3):359-383.
    Abstract: The 'special composition question' is this: given objects O1, . . . , On, under what conditions is there an object O, such that O1, . . . , On compose O? This paper explores a heterodox answer to this question, one that casts composition as a secondary quality. According to the approach I want to consider, there is an O that O1, . . . , On compose (roughly) just in case a normal intuiter would, under (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  23. Jan Westerhoff (2004). A Taxonomy of Composition Operations. Logique and Analyse 2004 (47):375-393.
    A set of parameters for classifying composition operations is introduced. These parameters determine whether a composition operation is 1) universal, 2) determinate, 3) whether there is a difference between possible and actual compositions, 4) whether there can be singleton compositions, 5) whether they give rise to a hierarchy, and 6) whether components of compositions can be repeated. Philosophical implications of these parameters (in particular in relation to set theory) and mereology are discussed.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Cody Gilmore (2010). Sider, The Inheritance of Intrinsicality, and Theories of Composition. Philosophical Studies 151 (2):177-197.
    I defend coincidentalism (the view that some pluralities have more than one mereological fusion) and restricted composition (the view that some pluralities lack mereological fusions) against recent arguments due to Theodore Sider.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  22
    Sara L. Uckelman, Jesse Alama & Aleks Knoks (2014). A Curious Dialogical Logic and its Composition Problem. Journal of Philosophical Logic 43 (6):1065-1100.
    Dialogue semantics for logic are two-player logic games between a Proponent who puts forward a logical formula φ as valid or true and an Opponent who disputes this. An advantage of the dialogical approach is that it is a uniform framework from which different logics can be obtained through only small variations of the basic rules. We introduce the composition problem for dialogue games as the problem of resolving, for a set S of rules for dialogue games, whether the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  26.  69
    Vivian Mizrahi (2009). Is Colour Composition Phenomenal? In D. Skusevich & P. Matikas (eds.), Color Perception: Physiology, Processes and Analysis. Nova Science Publishers
    Most philosophical or scientific theories suppose that colour composition judgments refer to the way colours appear to us. The dominant view is therefore phenomenalist in the sense that colour composition is phenomenally given to perceivers. This paper argues that there is no evidence for a phenomenalist view of colour composition and that a conventionalist approach should be favoured.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  27.  34
    Simon Evnine (2011). Constitution and Composition: Three Approaches to Their Relation. Protosociology 27:212-235.
    Constitution is the relation between something and what it is made of. Composition is the relation between something and its parts. I examine three different approaches to the relation between constitution and composition. One approach, associated with neo-Aristotelians like Mark Johnston and Kathrin Koslicki, identifies constitution with composition. A second, popular with those sympathetic to classical mereology such as Judith Thomson, defines constitution in terms of parthood. A third, advocated strongly by Lynne Baker, takes constitution to be (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  28. Bryan Frances, The Material Composition Problem.
    This is an essay for undergraduates. I set out the statue/clay problem and Tibbles/Tib in rich detail. I also present, with less detail, some other puzzles about material composition.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  25
    Massimiliano Carrara & Giorgio Lando (2016). Composition, Indiscernibility, Coreferentiality. Erkenntnis 81 (1):119-142.
    According to strong composition as identity, the logical principles of one–one and plural identity can and should be extended to the relation between a whole and its parts. Otherwise, composition would not be legitimately regarded as an identity relation. In particular, several defenders of strong CAI have attempted to extend Leibniz’s Law to composition. However, much less attention has been paid to another, not less important feature of standard identity: a standard identity statement is true iff its (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  5
    Claudio Pizzi (2016). Generalization and Composition of Modal Squares of Oppositions. Logica Universalis 10 (2-3):313-325.
    The first part of the paper aims at showing that the notion of an Aristotelian square may be seen as a special case of a variety of different more general notions: the one of a subAristotelian square, the one of a semiAristotelian square, the one of an Aristotelian cube, which is a construction made up of six semiAristotelian squares, two of which are Aristotelian. Furthermore, if the standard Aristotelian square is seen as a special ordered 4-tuple of formulas, there are (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  72
    David Vander Laan (2010). A Relevance Constraint on Composition. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (1):135-145.
    Whether certain objects compose a whole at a given time does not seem to depend on anything other than the character of those objects and the relations between them. This observation suggests a far-reaching constraint on theories of composition. One version of the constraint has been explicitly adopted by van Inwagen and rules out his own answer to the composition question. The constraint also rules out the other well-known moderate answers that have so far been proposed.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  32.  6
    K. McDaniel (2008). Against Composition as Identity. Analysis 68 (2):128-133.
    I argue that composition as identity is incompatible with the possibility of emergent properties (as characterized in the paper) and so should be rejected.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  22
    Jeffrey A. Barrett (forthcoming). The Evolution, Appropriation, and Composition of Rules. Synthese:1-14.
    This paper concerns how rule-following behavior might evolve in the context of a variety of Skyrms–Lewis signaling game (Lewis, Convention, 1969; Skyrms, Signals evolution, learning, & information 2010), how such rules might subsequently evolve to be used in new contexts, and how such appropriation allows for the composition of evolved rules. We will also consider how the composition of simpler rules to form more complex rules may be significantly more efficient than evolving the complex rules directly. And we (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  59
    Sheldon R. Smith (2010). Elementary Classical Mechanics and the Principle of the Composition of Causes. Synthese 173 (3):353-373.
    In this paper, I explore whether elementary classical mechanics adheres to the Principle of Composition of Causes as Mill claimed and as certain contemporary authors still seem to believe. Among other things, I provide a proof that if one reads Mill’s description of the principle literally, it does not hold in any general sense. In addition, I explore a separate notion of Composition of Causes and note that it too does not hold in elementary classical mechanics. Among the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  3
    Géraldine Pascal, Claudine Médigue & Antoine Danchin (2006). Persistent Biases in the Amino Acid Composition of Prokaryotic Proteins. Bioessays 28 (7):726-738.
    Correspondence analysis of 28 proteomes selected to span the entire realm of prokaryotes revealed universal biases in the proteins’ amino acid distribution. Integral Inner Membrane Proteins always form an individual cluster, which can then be used to predict protein localisation in unknown proteomes, independently of the organism’s biotope or kingdom. Orphan proteins are consistently rich in aromatic residues. Another bias is also ubiquitous: the amino acid composition is driven by the GþC content of the first codon position. An unexpected (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  36.  43
    Stephen Neale (1999). Coloring and Composition. In Kumiko Murasugi & Robert Stainton (eds.), Philosophy and Linguistics. Westview Press 35--82.
    The idea that an utterance of a basic (nondeviant) declarative sentence expresses a single true-or-false proposition has dominated philosophical discussions of meaning in this century. Refinements aside, this idea is less of a substantive theses than it is a background assumption against which particular theories of meaning are evaluated. But there are phenomena (noted by Frege, Strawson, and Grice) that threaten at least the completeness of classical theories of meaning, which associate with an utterance of a simple sentence a truth-condition, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  17
    Michael D. Kirchhoff (2015). Cognitive Assembly: Towards a Diachronic Conception of Composition. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (1):33-53.
    In this paper, I focus on a recent debate in extended cognition known as “cognitive assembly” and how cognitive assembly shares a certain kinship with the special composition question advanced in analytical metaphysics. Both the debate about cognitive assembly and the special composition question ask about the circumstances under which entities compose or assemble another entity. The paper argues for two points. The first point is that insofar as the metaphysics of composition presupposes that composition is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  9
    Donald L. Hatcher (1999). Why Critical Thinking Should Be Combined With Written Composition. Informal Logic 19 (2).
    This paper provides evidence and arguments that, given the choice of teaching critical thinking and written composition as separate, stand-alone courses or combining them, the two should be combined into an integrated sequence.
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  9
    Xavier Dumay & Vincent Dupriez (2008). Does the School Composition Effect Matter? Evidence From Belgian Data. British Journal of Educational Studies 56 (4):440 - 477.
    Even if the literature on the effects of pupil composition has been extensive, no clear consensus has been reached concerning the significance and magnitude of this effect. The first objective of this article is to estimate the magnitude of the school composition effect in primary schools (6th grade) in French-speaking Belgium. Different indicators of school composition are used: academic, socio-cultural, 'language' and sex composition. Except for sex composition, the results show that the school composition (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  6
    Andrew Courtwright, Sharon Brackett, Alexandra Cist, M. Cornelia Cremens, Eric L. Krakauer & Ellen M. Robinson (2014). The Changing Composition of a Hospital Ethics Committee: A Tertiary Care Center's Experience. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 26 (1):59-68.
    A growing body of research has demonstrated significant heterogeneity of hospital ethics committee (HEC) size, membership and training requirements, length of appointment, institutional support, clinical and policy roles, and predictors of self identified success. Because these studies have focused on HECs at a single point in time, however, little is known about how the composition of HECs changes over time and what impact these changes have on committee utilization. The current study presents 20 years of data on the evolution (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Ned Markosian (2008). Restricted Composition. In Theodore Sider, John Hawthorne & Dean W. Zimmerman (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Metaphysics. Blackwell Pub. 341--63.
    Let’s begin with a simple example. Consider two quarks: one near the tip of your nose, the other near the center of Alpha Centauri. Here is a question about these two subatomic particles: Is there an object that has these two quarks as its parts and that has no other parts? According to one view of the matter (a view that is surprisingly endorsed by a great many contemporary philosophers), the answer to this question is Yes. But I think it (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   30 citations  
  42.  20
    Jiri Benovsky (forthcoming). 'Nothing Over and Above' or 'Nothing'? On Eliminativism, Reductionism, and Composition. Polish Journal of Philosophy.
    In this article, I am interested in an issue concerning eliminativism about ordinary objects that can be put as the claim that the eliminativist is guilty of postulating the existence of something (atoms arranged tablewise) but not of something that is identical to it (the table). But, as we will see, this turns out to be a problem for everybody except the eliminativist. Indeed, this issue highlights a more general problem about the relationship between an entity and the parts the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Lucas Thorpe (2010). Is Kant's Realm of Ends a Unum Per Se? Aquinas, Suárez, Leibniz and Kant on Composition. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (3):461-485.
  44.  2
    Kris McDaniel (2010). Composition as Identity Does Not Entail Universalism. Erkenntnis 73 (1):97-100.
    A short paper proving what the title says.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  45.  32
    Jonah P. B. Goldwater (2015). No Composition, No Problem: Ordinary Objects as Arrangements. Philosophia 43 (2):367-379.
    On the grounds that there are no mereological composites, mereological nihilists deny that ordinary objects exist. Even if nihilism is true, however, I argue that tables and chairs exist anyway: for I deny that ordinary objects are the mereological sums the nihilist rejects. Instead, I argue, ordinary objects have a different nature; they are arrangements, not composites. My argument runs as follows. First, I defend realism about ordinary objects by showing that there is something that plays the role of ordinary (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  93
    Ben Blumson (2014). Depiction and Composition. In Resemblance and Representation. Open Book Publishers 99-116.
    Traditionally, the structure of a language is revealed by constructing an appropriate theory of meaning for that language, which exhibits how – and whether – the meaning of sentences in the language depends upon the meaning of their parts. In this paper, I argue that whether – and how – what pictures represent depends on what their parts represent should likewise by revealed by the construction of appropriate theories of representation for the symbol system of those pictures. This generalisation, I (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. E. J. Lowe (2001). Identity, Composition, and the Simplicity of the Self. In Kevin J. Corcoran (ed.), Soul, Body, and Survival. Ithaca: Cornell University Press
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  48.  9
    Dominique Guy Brassart (1992). Negation, Concession and Refutation in Counter-Argumentative Composition by Pupils From 8 to 12 Years Old and Adults. Argumentation 6 (1):77-98.
    In a theoretical first part we attempt to articulate the notions of concession, refutation and negation for monological linguistic activity, on the basis among other things of Mœschler's work on conversation. We distinguish the illocutionary act of refutation and the complex intervention of refutation, concession-invention, concession-repetition and concession-quotation. In a second part we analyze the place and role of (descriptive) negation in counter-argumentative texts written by 8- to 12-year-old pupils and adults in an artificial situation. We consider phenomena observed by (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  49.  6
    Bayla M. Myer & Daniel O'Connell (1972). Memory Span: Effects of String Length and String Composition. Journal of Experimental Psychology 95 (1):231.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  50.  8
    Delali B. K. Dovie, E. T. F. Witkowski & Charlie M. Shackleton (2005). Monetary Valuation of Livelihoods for Understanding the Composition and Complexity of Rural Households. Agriculture and Human Values 22 (1):87-103.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000