Search results for 'computing and philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Liesbeth De Mol & Giuseppe Primiero (forthcoming). Facing Computing as Technique: Towards a History and Philosophy of Computing. Philosophy and Technology:1-6.score: 81.0
    We present the methodological principles underlying the scientific activities of the DHST Commission on the History and Philosophy of Computing. This volume collects refereed selected papers from the First International Conference organized by the Commission.
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  2. Luciano Floridi (1999). Philosophy and Computing: An Introduction. Routledge.score: 60.0
    This accessible book explores the development, history and future of Information and Communication Technology using examples from philosophy. Luciano Floridi offers both an introduction to these technologies and a philosophical analysis of the problems they pose. The book examines a wide range of areas of technology, including the digital revolution, the Web and Internet, Artificial Intelligence and CD-ROMS. We see how the relationship between philosophy and computing provokes many crucial philosophical questions. Ultimately, Philosophy and Computing (...)
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  3. James Moor & Terrell Ward Bynum (eds.) (2002). Cyberphilosophy: The Intersection of Philosophy and Computing. Blackwell Pub..score: 54.0
    This cutting edge volume provides an overview of the dynamic new field of cyberphilosophy – the intersection of philosophy and computing.
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  4. Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic (2003). Shifting the Paradigm of Philosophy of Science: Philosophy of Information and a New Renaissance. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 13 (4):521-536.score: 51.0
    Computing is changing the traditional field of Philosophy of Science in a very profound way. First as a methodological tool, computing makes possible ``experimental Philosophy'' which is able to provide practical tests for different philosophical ideas. At the same time the ideal object of investigation of the Philosophy of Science is changing. For a long period of time the ideal science was Physics (e.g., Popper, Carnap, Kuhn, and Chalmers). Now the focus is shifting to the (...)
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  5. Anthony F. Beavers (2011). Recent Developments in Computing and Philosophy. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 42 (2):385-397.score: 51.0
    Because the label "computing and philosophy" can seem like an ad hoc attempt to tie computing to philosophy, it is important to explain why it is not, what it studies (or does) and how it differs from research in, say, "computing and history," or "computing and biology". The American Association for History and Computing is "dedicated to the reasonable and productive marriage of history and computer technology for teaching, researching and representing history through (...)
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  6. L. Floridi (ed.) (2004). The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Computing and Information. Blackwell.score: 48.0
    This Guide provides an ambitious state-of-the-art survey of the fundamental themes, problems, arguments and theories constituting the philosophy of computing.
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  7. Anthony F. Beavers, Luciano Floridi, Philosophy and Computing: An Introduction, Routledge, 1999.score: 48.0
    Luciano Floridi’s Philosophy and Computing: An Introduction is a survey of some important ideas that ground the newly emerging area of philosophy known, thanks to Floridi, as the philosophy of information. It was written as a textbook for philosophy students interested in the digital age, but is probably more useful for postgraduates who want to investigate intersections between philosophy and computer science, information theory and ICT (information and communications technology). The book is divided into (...)
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  8. Soraj Hongladarom (ed.) (2007). Computing and Philosophy in Asia. Cambridge Scholars Pub..score: 48.0
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  9. P. Thagard (2004). Computing in the Philosophy of Science. In L. Floridi (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Computing and Information. Blackwell. 307--317.score: 48.0
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  10. Luciano Floridi (2002). What is the Philosophy of Information? In James Moor & Terrell Ward Bynum (eds.), Cyberphilosophy: The Intersection of Philosophy and Computing. Blackwell Pub.. 123-145.score: 47.0
  11. Matti Tedre (2011). Computing as a Science: A Survey of Competing Viewpoints. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 21 (3):361-387.score: 45.0
    Since the birth of computing as an academic discipline, the disciplinary identity of computing has been debated fiercely. The most heated question has concerned the scientific status of computing. Some consider computing to be a natural science and some consider it to be an experimental science. Others argue that computing is bad science, whereas some say that computing is not a science at all. This survey article presents viewpoints for and against computing as (...)
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  12. L. Magnani & R. Dossena (eds.) (2005). Computing, Philosophy and Cognition.score: 45.0
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  13. Uri Pincas (2011). Program Verification and Functioning of Operative Computing Revisited: How About Mathematics Engineering? [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 21 (2):337-359.score: 42.0
    The issue of proper functioning of operative computing and the utility of program verification, both in general and of specific methods, has been discussed a lot. In many of those discussions, attempts have been made to take mathematics as a model of knowledge and certitude achieving, and accordingly infer about the suitable ways to handle computing. I shortly review three approaches to the subject, and then take a stance by considering social factors which affect the epistemic status of (...)
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  14. Patrick Grim (2002). Philosophy for Computers: Some Explorations in Philosophical Modeling. In James Moor & Terrell Ward Bynum (eds.), Cyberphilosophy: The Intersection of Philosophy and Computing. Blackwell Pub.. 181-209.score: 42.0
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  15. Luciano Floridi (ed.) (2003). Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Computing and Information. Blackwell.score: 42.0
    Ontology as a branch of philosophy is the science of what is, of the kinds and structures of objects, properties, events, processes and relations in every area of reality. ‘Ontology’ in this sense is often used by philosophers as a synonym of ‘metaphysics’ (a label meaning literally: ‘what comes after the Physics’), a term used by early students of Aristotle to refer to what Aristotle himself called ‘first philosophy’. But in recent years, in a development hardly noticed by (...)
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  16. Mireille Hildebrandt & Antoinette Rouvroy (eds.) (2011). Law, Human Agency, and Autonomic Computing: The Philosophy of Law Meets the Philosophy of Technology. Routledge.score: 42.0
     
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  17. M. Hildebrandt & Antoinette Rouvroy (eds.) (2011). The Philosophy of Law Meets the Philosophy of Technology: Autonomic Computing and Transformations of Human Agency. Routledge.score: 42.0
     
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  18. Charles Ess (2008). Luciano Floridi's Philosophy of Information and Information Ethics: Critical Reflections and the State of the Art. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 10 (2-3):89-96.score: 39.0
    I describe the emergence of Floridi’s philosophy of information (PI) and information ethics (IE) against the larger backdrop of Information and Computer Ethics (ICE). Among their many strengths, PI and IE offer promising metaphysical and ethical frameworks for a global ICE that holds together globally shared norms with the irreducible differences that define local cultural and ethical traditions. I then review the major defenses and critiques of PI and IE offered by contributors to this special issue, and highlight Floridi’s (...)
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  19. Gordana Dodig Crnkovic & Susan Stuart (eds.) (2007). Computation, Information, Cognition: The Nexus and the Liminal. Cambridge Scholars Press.score: 39.0
    Written by world-leading experts, this book draws together a number of important strands in contemporary approaches to the philosophical and scientific questions that emerge when dealing with the issues of computing, information, cognition and the conceptual issues that arise at their intersections. It discovers and develops the connections at the borders and in the interstices of disciplines and debates. This volume presents a range of essays that deal with the currently vigorous concerns of the philosophy of information, ontology (...)
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  20. Mark Bedau, To Appear in Luciano Floridi, Ed., Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Computing and Information.score: 39.0
    Artificial life (also known as “ALife”) is a broad, interdisciplinary endeavor that studies life and life-like processes through simulation and synthesis. The goals of this activity include modelling and even creating life and life-like systems, as well as developing practical applications using intuitions and methods taken from living systems. Artificial life both illuminates traditional philosophical questions and raises new philosophical questions. Since both artificial life and philosophy investigate the essential nature of certain fundamental aspects of reality like life and (...)
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  21. John Preston (2001). Luciano Floridi Philosophy and Computing: An Introduction. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 52 (1):197-200.score: 39.0
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  22. Patrick John Coppock, Graeme Kirkpatrick, Olli Tapio Leino & Anita Leirfall (2014). Introduction to the Special Issue on the Philosophy of Computer Games. Philosophy and Technology 27 (2):151-157.score: 39.0
    The seven articles that constitute this special issue illustrate scholarly interactions between philosophy and game studies. The wide range of game types/genres and the multiple philosophical issues concerning them are rich and productive. They indicate well the significant contribution that philosophical approaches can make to further development of scholarly understandings of computer games and gaming. Each article breaks new conceptual ground in ways likely to resonate within the new discipline of computer game studies but also, beyond this, in other (...)
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  23. Peter Scrimshaw (1989). Educational Computing: What Can Philosophy of Education Contribute? Journal of Philosophy of Education 23 (1):103–112.score: 39.0
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  24. Diane P. Michelfelder (2010). Philosophy, Privacy, and Pervasive Computing. AI and Society 25 (1):61-70.score: 39.0
    Philosophers and others concerned with the moral good of personal privacy most often see threats to privacy raised by the development of pervasive computing as primarily being threats to the loss of control over personal information. Two reasons in particular lend this approach plausibility. One reason is that the parallels between pervasive computing and ordinary networked computing, where everyday transactions over the Internet raise concerns about personal information privacy, appear stronger than their differences. Another reason is that (...)
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  25. Ana Viseu (2001). Philosophy and Computing: An Introduction. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 31 (1):25-26.score: 37.0
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  26. Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic (2011). Significance of Models of Computation, From Turing Model to Natural Computation. Minds and Machines 21 (2):301-322.score: 36.0
    The increased interactivity and connectivity of computational devices along with the spreading of computational tools and computational thinking across the fields, has changed our understanding of the nature of computing. In the course of this development computing models have been extended from the initial abstract symbol manipulating mechanisms of stand-alone, discrete sequential machines, to the models of natural computing in the physical world, generally concurrent asynchronous processes capable of modelling living systems, their informational structures and dynamics on (...)
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  27. Anthony F. Beavers (2001). Luciano Floridi, Philosophy and Computing: An Introduction. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 3 (4):299-301.score: 36.0
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  28. Yingxu Wang (2003). On Cognitive Informatics. [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 4 (2):151-167.score: 36.0
    Supplementary to matter and energy, information is the third essence for modeling the natural world. An emerging discipline known as cognitive informatics (CI) is developed recently that forms a profound interdisciplinary study of cognitive and information sciences, and tackles the common root problems sharing by informatics, computing, software engineering, artificial intelligence, cognitive science, neuropsychology, philosophy, linguistics, and life science. CI focuses on internal information processing mechanisms and the natural intelligence of the brain. This paper describes the historical development (...)
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  29. Amichai Kronfeld (1990). Reference and Computation: An Essay in Applied Philosophy of Language. Cambridge University Press.score: 36.0
    This book deals with a major problem in the study of language: the problem of reference. The ease with which we refer to things in conversation is deceptive. Upon closer scrutiny, it turns out that we hardly ever tell each other explicitly what object we mean, although we expect our interlocutor to discern it. Amichai Kronfeld provides an answer to two questions associated with this: how do we successfully refer, and how can a computer be programmed to achieve this? Beginning (...)
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  30. Robert Rosenberger (2013). The Importance of Generalized Bodily Habits for a Future World of Ubiquitous Computing. AI and Society 28 (3):289-296.score: 36.0
    In a future world of ubiquitous computing, in which humans interact with computerized technologies even more frequently and in even more situations than today, interface design will have increased importance. One feature of interface that I argue will be especially relevant is what I call abstract relational strategies. This refers to an approach (in both a bodily and conceptual sense) toward the use of a technology, an approach that is general enough to be applied in many different concrete scenarios. (...)
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  31. Lorenzo Magnai (2000). Philosophy and Computing. An Introduction, Luciano Floridi. Ethics and Information Technology 2 (2):137-138.score: 36.0
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  32. J. W. Sanders (2001). Luciano Floridi, Philosophy and Computing: An Introduction, London and New York: Routledge, 1999, XIV+242 Pp., ISBN 0-415-18025-. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 11 (1):151-154.score: 36.0
  33. Federico Gobbo & Marco Benini (forthcoming). The Minimal Levels of Abstraction in the History of Modern Computing. Philosophy and Technology:1-17.score: 36.0
    From the advent of general purpose, Turing-complete machines, the relation between operators, programmers and users with computers can be observed as interconnected informational organisms (inforgs), henceforth analysed with the method of levels of abstraction (LoAs), risen within the philosophy of information (PI). In this paper, the epistemological levellism proposed by L. Floridi in the PI to deal with LoAs will be formalised in constructive terms using category theory, so that information itself is treated as structure-preserving functions instead of Cartesian (...)
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  34. Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic (2009). European Computing and Philosophy. The Reasoner 3.score: 36.0
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  35. Ephraim Nissan (2006). Luciano Floridi (Ed), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Computing and Information. [REVIEW] Pragmatics and Cognition 14 (1):183-187.score: 36.0
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  36. A. F. Beavers (2001). Philosophy and Computing: An Introduction, Luciano Floridi. Ethics and Information Technology 3 (4):299-301.score: 36.0
     
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  37. Jack Copeland (ed.) (2004). The Essential Turing: Seminal Writings in Computing, Logic, Philosophy, Artificial Intelligence, and Artificial Life: Plus the Secrets of Enigma. Oup.score: 36.0
  38. Armond Duwell (2004). How to Teach an Old Dog New Tricks: Quantum Information, Quantum Computing, and the Philosophy of Physics. Dissertation, University of Pittsburghscore: 36.0
     
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  39. Luciano Floridi (ed.) (2002). Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Information and Computing. Blackwell.score: 36.0
  40. L. Magnani (ed.) (2005). European Computing and Philosophy Conference (ECAP 2004). College Publications.score: 36.0
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  41. Klaus Mainzer (ed.) (2010). ECAP10. VIII European Conference on Computing and Philosophy. Hut.score: 36.0
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  42. Krzysztof Wójtowicz (2010). Theory of Quantum Computation and Philosophy of Mathematics. Part I. Logic and Logical Philosophy 18 (3-4):313-332.score: 36.0
    The aim of this paper is to present some basic notions of the theory of quantum computing and to compare them with the basic notions of the classical theory of computation. I am convinced, that the results of quantum computation theory (QCT) are not only interesting in themselves, but also should be taken into account in discussions concerning the nature of mathematical knowledge. The philosophical discussion will however be postponed to another paper. QCT seems not to be well-known among (...)
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  43. Hector Zenil, A Computable Universe: Understanding and Exploring Nature as Computation.score: 34.0
    A Computable Universe is a collection of papers discussing computation in nature and the nature of computation, a compilation of the views of the pioneers in the contemporary area of intellectual inquiry focused on computational and informational theories of the world. This volume is the definitive source of informational/computational views of the world, and of cutting-edge models of the universe, both digital and quantum, discussed from a philosophical perspective as well as in the greatest technical detail. The book discusses the (...)
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  44. Gualtiero Piccinini (2007). Computational Modeling Vs. Computational Explanation: Is Everything a Turing Machine, and Does It Matter to the Philosophy of Mind? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 85 (1):93 – 115.score: 33.0
    According to pancomputationalism, everything is a computing system. In this paper, I distinguish between different varieties of pancomputationalism. I find that although some varieties are more plausible than others, only the strongest variety is relevant to the philosophy of mind, but only the most trivial varieties are true. As a side effect of this exercise, I offer a clarified distinction between computational modelling and computational explanation.<br><br>.
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  45. Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic, Semantics of Information as Interactive Computation. Proceedings of the Fifth International Workshop on Philosophy and Informatics 2008.score: 33.0
    Computers today are not only the calculation tools - they are directly (inter)acting in the physical world which itself may be conceived of as the universal computer (Zuse, Fredkin, Wolfram, Chaitin, Lloyd). In expanding its domains from abstract logical symbol manipulation to physical embedded and networked devices, computing goes beyond Church-Turing limit (Copeland, Siegelman, Burgin, Schachter). Computational processes are distributed, reactive, interactive, agent-based and concurrent. The main criterion of success of computation is not its termination, but the adequacy of (...)
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  46. Alisa Bokulich & Gregg Jaeger (eds.) (2010). Philosophy of Quantum Information and Entanglement. Cambridge University Press.score: 33.0
    "Entanglement can be understood as an extraordinary degree of correlation between states of quantum systems - a correlation that cannot be given an explanation ...
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  47. Luciano Floridi (2004). Open Problems in the Philosophy of Information. Metaphilosophy 35 (4):554-582.score: 33.0
    The philosophy of information (PI) is a new area of research with its own field of investigation and methodology. This article, based on the Herbert A. Simon Lecture of Computing and Philosophy I gave at Carnegie Mellon University in 2001, analyses the eighteen principal open problems in PI. Section 1 introduces the analysis by outlining Herbert Simon's approach to PI. Section 2 discusses some methodological considerations about what counts as a good philosophical problem. The discussion centers on (...)
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  48. Johnny Hartz Søraker (2012). Virtual Worlds and Their Challenge to Philosophy: Understanding the “Intravirtual” and the “Extravirtual”. Metaphilosophy 43 (4):499-512.score: 33.0
    The Web, in particular real-time interactions in three-dimensional virtual environments (virtual worlds), comes with a set of unique characteristics that leave our traditional frameworks inapplicable. The present article illustrates this by arguing that the notion of “technology relations,” as put forward by Ihde and Verbeek, becomes inapplicable when it comes to the Internet, and this inapplicability shows why these phenomena require new philosophical frameworks. Against this background, and more constructively, the article proposes a fundamental distinction between “intravirtual” and “extravirtual” consequences—a (...)
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  49. Peter Kuhnlein (2005). Computer Science as a Subject Matter for Philosophy of Science. In. In L. Magnani & R. Dossena (eds.), Computing, Philosophy and Cognition. 4--113.score: 33.0
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