Search results for 'concept formation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  21
    Alberto Vanzo (forthcoming). Kant and Abstractionism About Concept Formation. In Stefano Di Bella & Tad M. Schmaltz (eds.), Universals in Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press
    This chapter outlines Kant’s account of empirical concept formation and discusses two objections that have been advanced against it. Kant holds that we form empirical concepts, such as colour concepts, by comparing sensory representations of individuals, identifying shared features, and abstracting from the differences between them. According to the first objection, we cannot acquire colour concepts in this way because there is no feature that all and only the instances of a given colour share and the boundary between (...)
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  2.  54
    Iulian D. Toader (2013). Concept Formation and Scientific Objectivity: Weyl's Turn Against Husserl. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 3 (2):281-305.
    The idea that scientific objectivity requires a method of concept formation according to which concepts are freely created by the mind was famously propagated by Hermann Weyl. I argue that this idea, which he saw as essentially characterizing what physicists do when they do physics, led him to abandon the phenomenological view on objectivity, more particularly the strong connection between objectivity and evidence (understood in a Husserlian sense as a satisfaction of meaning intentions). The free (...)
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  3.  10
    Jörgen Sjögren & Christian Bennet (2014). Concept Formation and Concept Grounding. Philosophia 42 (3):827-839.
    Recently Carrie S. Jenkins formulated an epistemology of mathematics, or rather arithmetic, respecting apriorism, empiricism, and realism. Central is an idea of concept grounding. The adequacy of this idea has been questioned e.g. concerning the grounding of the mathematically central concept of set (or class), and of composite concepts. In this paper we present a view of concept formation in mathematics, based on ideas from Carnap, leading to modifications of Jenkins’s epistemology that may solve some problematic (...)
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  4.  5
    Howard H. Kendler & May F. D'Amato (1955). A Comparison of Reversal Shifts and Nonreversal Shifts in Human Concept Formation Behavior. Journal of Experimental Psychology 49 (3):165.
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  5. Arnold H. Buss (1956). Reversal and Nonreversal Shifts in Concept Formation with Partial Reinforcement Eliminated. Journal of Experimental Psychology 52 (3):162.
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  6.  1
    Michael B. Conant & Tom Trabasso (1964). Conjunctive and Disjunctive Concept Formation Under Equal-Information Conditions. Journal of Experimental Psychology 67 (3):250.
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  7.  3
    Arnold H. Buss (1950). A Study of Concept Formation as a Function of Reinforcement and Stimulus Generalization. Journal of Experimental Psychology 40 (4):494.
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  8.  5
    Belver C. Griffith, Herman H. Spitz & Ronald S. Lipman (1959). Verbal Mediation and Concept Formation in Retarded and Normal Subjects. Journal of Experimental Psychology 58 (3):247.
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  9.  3
    Rolland Metzger (1958). A Comparison Between Rote Learning and Concept Formation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 56 (3):226.
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  10.  2
    Martin Harrow & Gilbert B. Friedman (1958). Comparing Reversal and Nonreversal Shifts in Concept Formation with Partial Reinforcement Controlled. Journal of Experimental Psychology 55 (6):592.
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  11.  2
    James Cannon Dixon (1949). Concept Formation and Emergence of Contradictory Relations. Journal of Experimental Psychology 39 (2):144.
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  12.  2
    Herbert Wells (1963). Effects of Transfer and Problem Structure in Disjunctive Concept Formation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 65 (1):63.
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  13.  2
    Howard H. Kendler & Alan D. Karasik (1958). Concept Formation as a Function of Competition Between Response Produced Cues. Journal of Experimental Psychology 55 (3):278.
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  14.  2
    Patrick Suppes & Rose Ginsberg (1962). Application of a Stimulus Sampling Model to Children's Concept Formation with and Without Overt Correction Responses. Journal of Experimental Psychology 63 (4):330.
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  15.  2
    Concetta V. Romanow (1958). Anxiety Level and Ego Involvement as Factors in Concept Formation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 56 (2):166.
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  16.  1
    Sarnoff A. Mednick & Jonathan L. Freedman (1960). Facilitation of Concept Formation Through Mediated Generalization. Journal of Experimental Psychology 60 (5):278.
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  17.  1
    Jack Richardson & Bruce O. Bergum (1954). Distributed Practice and Rote Learning in Concept Formation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 47 (6):442.
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  18.  2
    Larry L. Jacoby & Robert C. Radtke (1969). Effects of Contiguity and Meaningfulness of Relevant and Irrelevant Attributes on Concept Formation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 81 (3):454.
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  19.  1
    Edward J. Green (1955). Concept Formation: A Problem in Human Operant Conditioning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 49 (3):175.
  20. J. Peter Denny (1966). Effects of Anxiety and Intelligence on Concept Formation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 72 (4):596.
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  21. Isidore Gormezano & Fred D. Abraham (1961). Intermittent Reinforcement, Nonreversal Shifts, and Neutralizing in Concept Formation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 61 (1):1.
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  22. Martin Harrow & Alexander M. Buchwald (1962). Reversal and Nonreversal Shifts in Concept Formation Using Consistent and Inconsistent Responses. Journal of Experimental Psychology 64 (5):476.
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  23. Martin Harrow (1964). Stimulus Aspects Responsible for the Rapid Acquisition of Reversal Shifts in Concept Formation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 67 (4):330.
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  24. Jerry Higgins, Sarnoff A. Mednick & Susan L. Taylor (1963). A Replication of Facilitation of Concept Formation Through Mediated Generalization. Journal of Experimental Psychology 65 (4):421.
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  25. I. David Isaacs & Carl P. Duncan (1962). Reversal and Nonreversal Shifts Within and Between Dimensions in Concept Formation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 64 (6):580.
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  26. Larry L. Jacoby & Robert C. Radtke (1970). Effects of Meaningfulness of Relevant and Irrelevant Stimuli in a Modified Concept Formation Task. Journal of Experimental Psychology 83 (2p1):356.
  27. Edwin Martin (1968). Short-Term Memory, Individual Differences, and Shift Performance in Concept Formation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 76 (4p1):514.
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  28. Margaret R. Somers (1995). What's Political or Cultural About Political Culture and the Public Sphere? Toward an Historical Sociology of Concept Formation. Sociological Theory 13 (2):113-144.
    The English translation of Habermas's The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere converges with a recent trend toward the revival of the "political culture concept" in the social sciences. Surprisingly, Habermas's account of the Western bourgeois public sphere has much in common with the original political culture concept associated with Parsonian modernization theory in the 1950s and 1960s. In both cases, the concept of political culture is used in a way that is neither political nor cultural. Explaining (...)
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  29.  27
    Heinrich Rickert (1986). The Limits of Concept Formation in Natural Science: A Logical Introduction to the Historical Sciences. Cambridge University Press.
    Heinrich Rickert (1863-1936) was One of the leading neo-Kantian philosophers in Germany and a crucial figure in the discussions of the foundations of the social sciences in the first quarter of the twentieth century. His views were extremely influential, most significantly on Max Weber. The Limits of Concept Formation in Natural Science is Rickert's most important work, and it is here translated into English for the first time. It presents his systematic theory of knowledge and philosophy of science, (...)
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  30. Andreas Bartels (1995). Chains of Meaning: A Model for Concept Formation in Contemporary Physics Theories. Synthese 105 (3):347 - 379.
    The rationality of scientific concept formation in theory transitions, challenged by the thesis of semantic incommensurability, can be restored by theChains of Meaning approach to concept formation. According to this approach, concepts of different, succeeding theories may be identified with respect to referential meaning, in spite of grave diversity of the mathematical structures characterizing them in their respective theories. The criterion of referential identity for concepts is that they meet a relation ofsemantic embedding, i.e. that the (...)
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  31.  11
    Paul Duncan Crawford (2001). Educating for Moral Ability: Reflections on Moral Development Based on Vygotsky's Theory of Concept Formation. Journal of Moral Education 30 (2):113-129.
    The idea examined here is that the development of moral ability shares important similarities with the development of conceptual thinking as outlined in the work of Lev Vygotsky. Most notably, the mature forms of both processes are ways of constructing meaning that are not governed by pre-established modes of behaviour. The principal suggestion here is that Vygotsky's theory of concept formation can be used as a generative model for understanding the development of moral ability in a way that (...)
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  32.  15
    Audrey Yap (2014). Dedekind and Cassirer on Mathematical Concept Formation. Philosophia Mathematica:nku029.
    Dedekind's major work on the foundations of arithmetic employs several techniques that have left him open to charges of psychologism, and through this, to worries about the objectivity of the natural-number concept he defines. While I accept that Dedekind takes the foundation for arithmetic to lie in certain mental powers, I will also argue that, given an appropriate philosophical background, this need not make numbers into subjective mental objects. Even though Dedekind himself did not provide that background, one can (...)
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  33.  20
    Nancy J. Nersessian (1988). Reasoning From Imagery and Analogy in Scientific Concept Formation. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1988:41 - 47.
    Concept formation in science is a reasoned process, commensurate with ordinary problem-solving processes. An account of how analogical reasoning and reasoning from imagistic representations generate new scientific concepts is presented. The account derives from case studies of concept formation in science and from computational theories of analogical problem solving in cognitive science. Concept formation by analogy is seen to be a process of increasing abstraction from existing conceptual structures.
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  34.  30
    John Drysdale (1996). How Are Social-Scientific Concepts Formed? A Reconstruction of Max Weber's Theory of Concept Formation. Sociological Theory 14 (1):71-88.
    Recent interpretations of Weber's theory of concept formation have concluded that it is seriously defective and therefore of questionable use in social science. Oakes and Burger have argued that Weber's ideas depend upon Rickert's epistemology, whose arguments Oakes finds to be invalid; by implication, Weber's theory fails. An attempt is made to reconstruct Weber's theory on the basis of his 1904 essay on objectivity. Pivotal to Weber's theory is his distinction between concept and judgment (hypothesis), where the (...)
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  35.  4
    Ophir Nave (2008). Sign-Mediated Concept Formation. American Journal of Semiotics 24 (1/3):107-123.
    Based on our prior work we proceed from the notion that the mind has the capacity to generate and use concepts through themediation of signs. This mediation constrains the vast potential for confusion, given the incalculable number of similarities between objects in the world and therefore has important adaptive value. Despite the ubiquity of sign-mediated concept formation , a rigorous formalization of this phenomenon is rare. Following the work of Neuman and Nave , here we present a formal (...)
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  36.  9
    T. Brian Mooney, A Response to Hart on Penumbra in Law: Kovesi's Account of Concept Formation.
    In a famous debate on jurisprudence held in 1958 between H. L. A. Hart and Lon Fuller, the protagonists argued about the nature of the law. On one side was H. L. A. Hart, who was a staunch defender of two ideas, first, that law was to be separated from morals, and secondly, that law as it is should be separated from law as it ought to be. These two ideas are subtly different. On the other side, is Fuller, who (...)
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  37.  3
    Christopher Winch (2015). Innatism, Concept Formation, Concept Mastery and Formal Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 49 (4):539-556.
    This article will consider the claim that the possession of concepts is innate rather than learned. Innatism about concept learning is explained through consideration of the work of Fodor and Chomsky. First, an account of concept formation is developed. Second the argument against the claim that concepts are learned through the construction of a learning paradox developed by Fodor is considered. It is argued that, despite initial plausibility, the learning paradox is not, in fact, a paradox at (...)
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  38.  29
    Renate Bartsch (1996). The Relationship Between Connectionist Models and a Dynamic Data-Oriented Theory of Concept Formation. Synthese 108 (3):421 - 454.
    In this paper I shall compare two models of concept formation, both inspired by basic convictions of philosophical empiricism. The first, the connectionist model, will be exemplified by Kohonen maps, and the second will be my own dynamic theory of concept formation. Both can be understood in probabilistic terms, both use a notion of convergence or stabilization in modelling how concepts are built up. Both admit destabilization of concepts and conceptual change. Both do not use a (...)
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  39.  2
    Amy Ione (2003). Examining Semir Zekis Neural Concept Formation and Art: Dante, Michelangelo, Wagner. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (2):58-66.
    In his paper, 'Neural Concept Formation and Art: Dante, Michelangelo, Wagner' Semir Zeki writes 'we can trace the origins of art to a fundamental characteristic of the brain, namely its capacity to form concepts' . He proposes that 'this capacity is itself the by-product of an essential characteristic of the brain. That characteristic is abstraction, and is imposed upon the brain by one of its chief functions, namely the acquisition of knowledge.' . Then, centring his argument around 'the (...)
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  40.  4
    I. P. L. McLaren, Andy J. Wills & S. Graham (2011). Representation Development, Perceptual Learning, and Concept Formation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (3):141-142.
    We argue for an example of based on Diamond and Carey's (1986) work on expertise and recognition, which is not made use of in The Origin of Concepts. This mechanism for perceptual learning seems to have all the necessary characteristics in that it is innate, domain-specific (requires stimulus sets possessing a certain structure), and demonstrably affects categorisation in a way that strongly suggests it will influence concept formation as well.
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  41.  6
    Mukesh J. Patel (1994). Concept Formation: A Complex Adaptative Approach. Theoria 9 (1):89-108.
    Concept formation is complex cognitive phenomenon which has been only partially modelIed in Cognitive Psychology and AI. Following a detailed and critical evaluation of such models we conclude that their main shortcoming of not being able to explain the nature of the semantics of concepts is because they fail to take into account the role of learning in concept formation. As a radical alternative it is proposed that a more (semantically) complete model would necessarily have to (...)
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  42.  4
    Joseph M. Firestone (1971). Remarks on Concept Formation: Theory Building and Theory Testing. Philosophy of Science 38 (4):570-604.
    Concepts originating in the philosophy of science generally are used only ritualistically and in careful isolation from research practice in political science. But philosophical considerations are fundamental to political research, and critically influence its decisions. The question is whether ideas offered by philosophers of science have practical (that is to say, theoretical) significance for political researchers. This essay argues that philosophy of science has extremely relevant ideas to offer. The argument proceeds through an initial presentation of some elementary notions drawn (...)
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  43. Ian Bryan, Peter Langford & John McGarry (eds.) (2015). The Foundation of the Juridico-Political: Concept Formation in Hans Kelsen and Max Weber. Routledge.
    Hans Kelsen and Max Weber are conventionally understood as initiators not only of two distinct and opposing processes of concept formation, but also of two discrete and contrasting theoretical frameworks for the study of law. _The Foundation of the Juridical-Political: Concept Formation in Hans Kelsen and Max Weber _places the conventional understanding of the theoretical relationship between the work of Kelsen and Weber into question. Focusing on the theoretical foundations of Kelsen’s legal positivism and Weber’s sociology (...)
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  44. Christoph Helmig (2004). What is the Systematic Place of Abstraction and Concept Formation in Plato's Philosophy? Ancient and Modern Readings of Phaedrus 249 B-C. In Carlos G. Steel, Gerd van Riel, Caroline Macé & Leen van Campe (eds.), Platonic Ideas and Concept Formation in Ancient and Medieval Thought. Leuven University Press
  45. Guy Oakes (ed.) (1986). The Limits of Concept Formation in Natural Science: A Logical Introduction to the Historical Sciences. Cambridge University Press.
    Heinrich Rickert was one of the leading neo-Kantian philosophers in Germany and a crucial figure in the discussions of the foundations of the social sciences in the first quarter of the twentieth century. His views were extremely influential, most significantly on Max Weber. The Limits of Concept Formation in Natural Science is Rickert's most important work, and it is here translated into English for the first time. It presents his systematic theory of knowledge and philosophy of science, and (...)
     
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  46. William Outhwaite (2010). Concept Formation in Social Science. Routledge.
    First published in 1983, this book examines the problems of concept formation in the social sciences, and in particular sociology, from the standpoint of a realistic philosophy of science. Beginning with a discussion of positivistic, hermeneutic, rationalist and realistic philosophies of science, Dr Outhwaite argues that realism is best able to furnish rational criteria for the choice and specification of social scientific concepts. A realistic philosophy of science therefore acts as his reference point for the dialectical presentation of (...)
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  47.  7
    Nancy J. Nersessian (2005). Abstraction Via Generic Modeling in Concept Formation in Science. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 86 (1):117-144.
    Cases where analogy has played a significant role in the formation of a new scientific concept are well-documented. Yet, how is it that genuinely new representations can be constructed from existing representations? It is argued that the process of ‘generic modeling’ enables abstraction of features common to both the domain of the source of the analogy and of the target phenomena. The analysis focuses on James Clerk Maxwell's construction of the electromagnetic field concept. The mathematical representation Maxwell (...)
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  48.  22
    Tze-Wan Kwan 關子尹 (2011). Abstract Concept Formation in Archaic Chinese Script Forms: Some Humboldtian Perspectives. Philosophy East and West 61 (3):409-452.
    In a paper that I presented in Berlin in 2005,1 I argued that Wilhelm von Humboldt, widely acclaimed as the father of general linguistics, can also be regarded as a German idealist. This is especially true if we, following in the footsteps of Heidegger2 and Mahnke,3 further broaden the concept of German idealism to cover the entire trend of the German humanistic tradition for which the formation and development of the human intellect remained a lasting concern. But as (...)
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  49. Robert G. Cook (2002). Same-Different Concept Formation in Pigeons. In Marc Bekoff, Colin Allen & Gordon M. Burghardt (eds.), The Cognitive Animal: Empirical and Theoretical Perspectives on Animal Cognition. MIT Press 229--237.
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  50.  25
    Tze-Wan Kwan 關子尹 (2011). Abstract Concept Formation in Archaic Chinese Script Forms: Some Humboldtian Perspectives. Philosophy East and West 61 (3):409-452.
    Starting from the Humboldtian characterization of Chinese writing as a "script of thoughts," this article makes an attempt to show that notwithstanding the important role played by phonetic elements, the Chinese script also relies on visual-graphical means in its constitution of meaning. In point of structure, Chinese characters are made up predominantly of components that are sensible or even tangible in nature. Out of these sensible components, not only physical objects or empirical states of affairs can be (...)
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