Search results for 'concept formation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Iulian D. Toader (2013). Concept Formation and Scientific Objectivity: Weyl's Turn Against Husserl. HOPOS 3 (2):281-305.score: 90.0
    The idea that scientific objectivity requires a method of concept formation according to which concepts are freely created by the mind was famously propagated by Hermann Weyl. I argue that this idea, which he saw as essentially characterizing what physicists do when they do physics, led him to abandon the phenomenological view on objectivity, more particularly the strong connection between objectivity and evidence (understood in a Husserlian sense as a satisfaction of meaning intentions). The free creation of concepts, (...)
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  2. Howard H. Kendler & May F. D'Amato (1955). A Comparison of Reversal Shifts and Nonreversal Shifts in Human Concept Formation Behavior. Journal of Experimental Psychology 49 (3):165.score: 75.0
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  3. Belver C. Griffith, Herman H. Spitz & Ronald S. Lipman (1959). Verbal Mediation and Concept Formation in Retarded and Normal Subjects. Journal of Experimental Psychology 58 (3):247.score: 75.0
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  4. Larry L. Jacoby & Robert C. Radtke (1969). Effects of Contiguity and Meaningfulness of Relevant and Irrelevant Attributes on Concept Formation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 81 (3):454.score: 75.0
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  5. Arnold H. Buss (1950). A Study of Concept Formation as a Function of Reinforcement and Stimulus Generalization. Journal of Experimental Psychology 40 (4):494.score: 75.0
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  6. Arnold H. Buss (1956). Reversal and Nonreversal Shifts in Concept Formation with Partial Reinforcement Eliminated. Journal of Experimental Psychology 52 (3):162.score: 75.0
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  7. Michael B. Conant & Tom Trabasso (1964). Conjunctive and Disjunctive Concept Formation Under Equal-Information Conditions. Journal of Experimental Psychology 67 (3):250.score: 75.0
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  8. J. Peter Denny (1966). Effects of Anxiety and Intelligence on Concept Formation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 72 (4):596.score: 75.0
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  9. James Cannon Dixon (1949). Concept Formation and Emergence of Contradictory Relations. Journal of Experimental Psychology 39 (2):144.score: 75.0
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  10. Isidore Gormezano & Fred D. Abraham (1961). Intermittent Reinforcement, Nonreversal Shifts, and Neutralizing in Concept Formation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 61 (1):1.score: 75.0
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  11. Edward J. Green (1955). Concept Formation: A Problem in Human Operant Conditioning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 49 (3):175.score: 75.0
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  12. Martin Harrow & Gilbert B. Friedman (1958). Comparing Reversal and Nonreversal Shifts in Concept Formation with Partial Reinforcement Controlled. Journal of Experimental Psychology 55 (6):592.score: 75.0
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  13. Martin Harrow & Alexander M. Buchwald (1962). Reversal and Nonreversal Shifts in Concept Formation Using Consistent and Inconsistent Responses. Journal of Experimental Psychology 64 (5):476.score: 75.0
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  14. Martin Harrow (1964). Stimulus Aspects Responsible for the Rapid Acquisition of Reversal Shifts in Concept Formation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 67 (4):330.score: 75.0
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  15. Jerry Higgins, Sarnoff A. Mednick & Susan L. Taylor (1963). A Replication of Facilitation of Concept Formation Through Mediated Generalization. Journal of Experimental Psychology 65 (4):421.score: 75.0
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  16. I. David Isaacs & Carl P. Duncan (1962). Reversal and Nonreversal Shifts Within and Between Dimensions in Concept Formation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 64 (6):580.score: 75.0
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  17. Larry L. Jacoby & Robert C. Radtke (1970). Effects of Meaningfulness of Relevant and Irrelevant Stimuli in a Modified Concept Formation Task. Journal of Experimental Psychology 83 (2p1):356.score: 75.0
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  18. Howard H. Kendler & Alan D. Karasik (1958). Concept Formation as a Function of Competition Between Response Produced Cues. Journal of Experimental Psychology 55 (3):278.score: 75.0
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  19. Edwin Martin (1968). Short-Term Memory, Individual Differences, and Shift Performance in Concept Formation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 76 (4p1):514.score: 75.0
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  20. Sarnoff A. Mednick & Jonathan L. Freedman (1960). Facilitation of Concept Formation Through Mediated Generalization. Journal of Experimental Psychology 60 (5):278.score: 75.0
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  21. Rolland Metzger (1958). A Comparison Between Rote Learning and Concept Formation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 56 (3):226.score: 75.0
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  22. Jack Richardson & Bruce O. Bergum (1954). Distributed Practice and Rote Learning in Concept Formation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 47 (6):442.score: 75.0
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  23. Concetta V. Romanow (1958). Anxiety Level and Ego Involvement as Factors in Concept Formation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 56 (2):166.score: 75.0
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  24. Patrick Suppes & Rose Ginsberg (1962). Application of a Stimulus Sampling Model to Children's Concept Formation with and Without Overt Correction Responses. Journal of Experimental Psychology 63 (4):330.score: 75.0
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  25. Herbert Wells (1963). Effects of Transfer and Problem Structure in Disjunctive Concept Formation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 65 (1):63.score: 75.0
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  26. Margaret R. Somers (1995). What's Political or Cultural About Political Culture and the Public Sphere? Toward an Historical Sociology of Concept Formation. Sociological Theory 13 (2):113-144.score: 60.0
    The English translation of Habermas's The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere converges with a recent trend toward the revival of the "political culture concept" in the social sciences. Surprisingly, Habermas's account of the Western bourgeois public sphere has much in common with the original political culture concept associated with Parsonian modernization theory in the 1950s and 1960s. In both cases, the concept of political culture is used in a way that is neither political nor cultural. Explaining (...)
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  27. Andreas Bartels (1995). Chains of Meaning: A Model for Concept Formation in Contemporary Physics Theories. Synthese 105 (3):347 - 379.score: 60.0
    The rationality of scientific concept formation in theory transitions, challenged by the thesis of semantic incommensurability, can be restored by theChains of Meaning approach to concept formation. According to this approach, concepts of different, succeeding theories may be identified with respect to referential meaning, in spite of grave diversity of the mathematical structures characterizing them in their respective theories. The criterion of referential identity for concepts is that they meet a relation ofsemantic embedding, i.e. that the (...)
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  28. Heinrich Rickert (1986). The Limits of Concept Formation in Natural Science: A Logical Introduction to the Historical Sciences. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Heinrich Rickert (1863-1936) was One of the leading neo-Kantian philosophers in Germany and a crucial figure in the discussions of the foundations of the social sciences in the first quarter of the twentieth century. His views were extremely influential, most significantly on Max Weber. The Limits of Concept Formation in Natural Science is Rickert's most important work, and it is here translated into English for the first time. It presents his systematic theory of knowledge and philosophy of science, (...)
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  29. Renate Bartsch (1996). The Relationship Between Connectionist Models and a Dynamic Data-Oriented Theory of Concept Formation. Synthese 108 (3):421 - 454.score: 60.0
    In this paper I shall compare two models of concept formation, both inspired by basic convictions of philosophical empiricism. The first, the connectionist model, will be exemplified by Kohonen maps, and the second will be my own dynamic theory of concept formation. Both can be understood in probabilistic terms, both use a notion of convergence or stabilization in modelling how concepts are built up. Both admit destabilization of concepts and conceptual change. Both do not use a (...)
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  30. Nancy J. Nersessian (1988). Reasoning From Imagery and Analogy in Scientific Concept Formation. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1988:41 - 47.score: 60.0
    Concept formation in science is a reasoned process, commensurate with ordinary problem-solving processes. An account of how analogical reasoning and reasoning from imagistic representations generate new scientific concepts is presented. The account derives from case studies of concept formation in science and from computational theories of analogical problem solving in cognitive science. Concept formation by analogy is seen to be a process of increasing abstraction from existing conceptual structures.
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  31. John Drysdale (1996). How Are Social-Scientific Concepts Formed? A Reconstruction of Max Weber's Theory of Concept Formation. Sociological Theory 14 (1):71-88.score: 60.0
    Recent interpretations of Weber's theory of concept formation have concluded that it is seriously defective and therefore of questionable use in social science. Oakes and Burger have argued that Weber's ideas depend upon Rickert's epistemology, whose arguments Oakes finds to be invalid; by implication, Weber's theory fails. An attempt is made to reconstruct Weber's theory on the basis of his 1904 essay on objectivity. Pivotal to Weber's theory is his distinction between concept and judgment (hypothesis), where the (...)
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  32. Paul Duncan Crawford (2001). Educating for Moral Ability: Reflections on Moral Development Based on Vygotsky's Theory of Concept Formation. Journal of Moral Education 30 (2):113-129.score: 60.0
    The idea examined here is that the development of moral ability shares important similarities with the development of conceptual thinking as outlined in the work of Lev Vygotsky. Most notably, the mature forms of both processes are ways of constructing meaning that are not governed by pre-established modes of behaviour. The principal suggestion here is that Vygotsky's theory of concept formation can be used as a generative model for understanding the development of moral ability in a way that (...)
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  33. Mukesh J. Patel (1994). Concept Formation: A Complex Adaptative Approach. Theoria 9 (1):89-108.score: 60.0
    Concept formation is complex cognitive phenomenon which has been only partially modelIed in Cognitive Psychology and AI. Following a detailed and critical evaluation of such models we conclude that their main shortcoming of not being able to explain the nature of the semantics of concepts is because they fail to take into account the role of learning in concept formation. As a radical alternative it is proposed that a more (semantically) complete model would necessarily have to (...)
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  34. Joseph M. Firestone (1971). Remarks on Concept Formation: Theory Building and Theory Testing. Philosophy of Science 38 (4):570-604.score: 60.0
    Concepts originating in the philosophy of science generally are used only ritualistically and in careful isolation from research practice in political science. But philosophical considerations are fundamental to political research, and critically influence its decisions. The question is whether ideas offered by philosophers of science have practical (that is to say, theoretical) significance for political researchers. This essay argues that philosophy of science has extremely relevant ideas to offer. The argument proceeds through an initial presentation of some elementary notions drawn (...)
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  35. I. P. L. McLaren, Andy J. Wills & S. Graham (2011). Representation Development, Perceptual Learning, and Concept Formation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (3):141-142.score: 60.0
    We argue for an example of based on Diamond and Carey's (1986) work on expertise and recognition, which is not made use of in The Origin of Concepts. This mechanism for perceptual learning seems to have all the necessary characteristics in that it is innate, domain-specific (requires stimulus sets possessing a certain structure), and demonstrably affects categorisation in a way that strongly suggests it will influence concept formation as well.
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  36. Christoph Helmig (2004). What is the Systematic Place of Abstraction and Concept Formation in Plato's Philosophy? Ancient and Modern Readings of Phaedrus 249 B-C. In Carlos G. Steel, Gerd van Riel, Caroline Macé & Leen van Campe (eds.), Platonic Ideas and Concept Formation in Ancient and Medieval Thought. Leuven University Press.score: 60.0
  37. Tze-Wan Kwan 關子尹 (2011). Abstract Concept Formation in Archaic Chinese Script Forms: Some Humboldtian Perspectives. Philosophy East and West 61 (3):409-452.score: 57.0
    In a paper that I presented in Berlin in 2005,1 I argued that Wilhelm von Humboldt, widely acclaimed as the father of general linguistics, can also be regarded as a German idealist. This is especially true if we, following in the footsteps of Heidegger2 and Mahnke,3 further broaden the concept of German idealism to cover the entire trend of the German humanistic tradition for which the formation and development of the human intellect remained a lasting concern. But as (...)
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  38. Nancy J. Nersessian (2005). Abstraction Via Generic Modeling in Concept Formation in Science. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 86 (1):117-144.score: 57.0
    Cases where analogy has played a significant role in the formation of a new scientific concept are well-documented. Yet, how is it that genuinely new representations can be constructed from existing representations? It is argued that the process of ‘generic modeling’ enables abstraction of features common to both the domain of the source of the analogy and of the target phenomena. The analysis focuses on James Clerk Maxwell's construction of the electromagnetic field concept. The mathematical representation Maxwell (...)
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  39. Alexei Procyshyn (2013). The Origins of Walter Benjamin's Concept of Philosophical Critique. Metaphilosophy 44 (5):655-681.score: 54.0
    Focusing on Walter Benjamin's earliest pieces dedicated to school reform and the student movement, this article traces the basic critical approaches informing his mature thought back to his struggle to critically implement and transform the theory of concept formation and value presentation developed by his Freiburg teacher, Heinrich Rickert. It begins with an account of Rickert's work, specifically of the concept of Darstellung (presentation) and its central role in Rickert's postmetaphysical theory of historical research (which he characterizes (...)
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  40. Tze-Wan Kwan 關子尹 (2011). Abstract Concept Formation in Archaic Chinese Script Forms: Some Humboldtian Perspectives. Philosophy East and West 61 (3):409-452.score: 51.0
    Starting from the Humboldtian characterization of Chinese writing as a "script of thoughts," this article makes an attempt to show that notwithstanding the important role played by phonetic elements, the Chinese script also relies on visual-graphical means in its constitution of meaning. In point of structure, Chinese characters are made up predominantly of components that are sensible or even tangible in nature. Out of these sensible components, not only physical objects or empirical states of affairs can be expressed, but also (...)
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  41. Timo Honkela, Ville Könönen, Tiina Lindh‐Knuutila & Mari‐Sanna Paukkeri (2008). Simulating Processes of Concept Formation and Communication. Journal of Economic Methodology 15 (3):245-259.score: 51.0
    We propose a theoretical framework for modeling communication between agents that have different conceptual models of their current context. We describe how the emergence of subjective models of the world can be simulated and what the role of language and communication in that process is. We consider, in particular, the role of unsupervised learning in the formation of agents' conceptual models, the relative subjectivity of these models, and the communication and learning processes that lead into intersubjective sharing of concepts. (...)
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  42. Alfred Leo White (2010). Perception, Language, and Concept Formation in St. Thomas. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 84:197-212.score: 51.0
    According to St. Thomas, animals (both rational and non-rational) perceive objects in terms of goal-directed interactions. Repeated interactions give riseto consuetudo (translated custom or practice), a habit of sense memory that enables one to act skillfully. The interactive component of perception enables animals and humans to communicate. In humans, these perceptions are instrumental to the formation of concepts pertaining to life in society (such as law and liturgy) as well as to the understanding of human nature. But perception is (...)
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  43. Robert Sokolowski (1964). The Formation of Husserl's Concept of Constitution. The Hague, M. Nijhoff.score: 48.0
    In tracing the formation of Husserl's concept of constitution, we hope to further the understanding of what he considers a philosophical explanation. ...
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  44. Asaf Kedar (2007). Ideal Types as Hermeneutic Concepts. Journal of the Philosophy of History 1 (3):318-345.score: 48.0
    My paper sets out to demonstrate that Weber's ideal-typical theory of concept formation, subject to certain modifications, is compatible with the principles of philosophical hermeneutics and is therefore a valuable strategy of concept formation for interpretive historical inquiry. The essay begins with a brief recapitulation of the philosophical-hermeneutic approach to the human sciences. I then chart out the affinities as well as the discrepancies between philosophical hermeneutics and Weber's theory of the ideal type. Against this backdrop, (...)
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  45. Kenneth R. Livingston (1998). The Case for General Mechanisms in Concept Formation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):581-582.score: 48.0
    Reasons are given for believing that it is premature to abandon the idea that domain-general models of concept learning can explain how human beings understand the biological world. Questions are raised about whether the evidence for domain specificity is convincing, and it is suggested that two constraints on domain-general concept learning models may be sufficient to account for the available data.
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  46. David West (1987). Power and Formation: New Foundations for a Radical Concept of Power. Inquiry 30 (1 & 2):137 – 154.score: 48.0
    A radical concept of power identifies social processes which (whether as ?ideology?, ?false consciousness?, or ?the spectacle') influence people's actions by moulding their beliefs or desires. However, seeing people as deluded is to risk treating them as less than fully autonomous beings. Despite his libertarian intentions, Lukes fails to guard against this paternalistic implication. His view still implies that it is the social critic who is in the best position to identify the real interests of an oppressed group. Here (...)
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  47. Matthias Perleth (1997). The Discovery of Chagas' Disease and the Formation of the Early Chagas' Disease Concept. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 19 (2):211 - 236.score: 48.0
    This paper attempts to show how leading contemporary disciplines influenced the discovery of Chagas' disease and the formation of the early disease concept. Chagas was among the first generation of Brazilian trained scientists who incorporated modern principles of tropical medicine in its research. Thus, Chagas was familiar with characteristics of vector borne tropical diseases such as malaria and yellow fever. The detection of a hitherto unknown trypanosome in the gut of a reduviid bug prompted him to search for (...)
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  48. Carlos G. Steel, Gerd van Riel, Caroline Macé & Leen van Campe (eds.) (2004). Platonic Ideas and Concept Formation in Ancient and Medieval Thought. Leuven University Press.score: 47.0
    From an epistemological viewpoint, the Forms constitute the objects of true knowledge. From an ontological point of view, they are the principles that underlie the order of the universe.
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  49. Barbara A. Younger (2010). Categorization and Concept Formation in Human Infants. In Denis Mareschal, Paul Quinn & Stephen E. G. Lea (eds.), The Making of Human Concepts. Oup Oxford. 245.score: 46.0
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  50. Uljana Feest (2012). Exploratory Experiments, Concept Formation, and Theory Construction in Psychology. In Uljana Feest & Friedrich Steinle (eds.), Scientific Concepts and Investigative Practice. De Gruyter. 3--167.score: 46.0
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